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Jacqueline Kennedy

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December 16, 2003 | From Associated Press
A priest's diary of private conversations with Jacqueline Kennedy after her husband's assassination should never again be seen in public, the head of Georgetown University's Jesuit community said Monday. The Rev. Brian McDermott said the papers, which detailed Kennedy's anguish and thoughts of suicide, should have been destroyed long ago. The decision to show them to reporters last month further eroded the public's trust in priests, he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Three days after Lee Harvey Oswald's bullet inconsolably blackened the mood of America, Leonard Bernstein tried to lift the nation's spirits by focusing on a special legacy - one that is getting too little attention in the commentary around Friday's 50th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Instead of performing a requiem Mass for a slain Roman Catholic president, Bernstein led the New York Philharmonic in Mahler's Second Symphony, known as the "Resurrection. " JFK had, like no president before him, empowered artists, and that was expected to last.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2000 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michel Kazan gave up on becoming a cosmetic surgeon because, "I wanted to make women beautiful without cutting their faces." So he chose other tools--a comb and scissors--and used them to create some of the signature hairstyles of the 1950s, '60s and '70s. Kazan was best known for the bouffant, essentially a pageboy with the sides teased out, which he created for Jacqueline Kennedy in 1950. He also created the bubble, a helmet of tight curls around the head.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2013 | By Bob Pool
The U.S. Postal Service wanted to honor slain President John F. Kennedy, but first it needed Jackie Kennedy's stamp of approval. That's how a Los Angeles Times photo came to be chosen for the first commemorative postage stamp honoring the fallen president following his Nov. 22, 1963, assassination in Dallas. The 5-cent stamp issued on May 29, 1964, was based on a photo of then-Sen. Kennedy during a visit to the Santa Monica beachfront home of his brother-in-law, actor Peter Lawford, by Times staff photographer William S. Murphy.
OPINION
May 22, 1994 | Chris Chase, Chris Chase is the co-author of "Josephine: The Hungry Heart" (Random House), a biography of Josephine Baker.
Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis died Thursday. Outside her Fifth Avenue apartment strangers gathered, strewed rose petals, lit candles. She was 64 and she had been a role model for thousands of women. She was loved by people she didn't know and who didn't know her. What they responded to was the image she presented. She was smart, brave, complicated and, one suspects, she understood that it was all--politics and fashion, Camelot and the pill-box hat--about image.
NEWS
November 22, 1998 | MIKE FEINSILBER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
To Lyndon Johnson, the telephone was an extension of himself. If he couldn't reach out and grab someone by the lapels, he could grab them with his phone. He used it to cajole, court, plead, stroke, beg for sympathy. When the Clinton White House finds itself in a new crisis, its impulse is to add a new layer of staff. A freshly released cluster of Johnson's private telephone tapes shows that LBJ did not need spinners; he could simply reach for the phone and work his wiles.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I must confess, if I never again hear the words "king," "queen," "dynasty" or "royalty" applied to prominent Americans, that day can't come too soon. For the citizens of a republic, expressly dedicated to the proposition that all men (and, let us hope, women) are created equal, to grovel and gush over individuals whose chief distinction is their celebrity or social position is not a healthy sign.
NEWS
April 23, 2001 | ANNE BRATSKEIR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During an official trip to India in 1962, First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy wore an Oleg Cassini dress and coat of apricot silk for a daytime boat ride on Lake Pichola. "This ensemble brilliantly served Mrs.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
She is forever frozen in time: the look of anguish etched on her face; her pillbox hat slightly askew on the bouffant hairdo; her suit, a color known then as Schiaparelli pink, stained with the blood of her fallen husband. That image from Nov. 22, 1963, said someone very close to her, "is burned in people's minds." Twenty-five years have passed since the glamorous young First Lady became the grieving young widow. On her next birthday, Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis will turn 60.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Brilliantly conceived and beautifully crafted, "Letters to Jackie: Remembering President Kennedy" may not only be one of the year's best documentaries but one of the year's finest overall films. The movie is based on readings of actual condolence letters sent to Jacqueline Kennedy after John F. Kennedy's assassination, read in voice-overs by celebrities. If that may sound a bit dreary or cliched, the result is anything but. Writer-director Bill Couturié (who made the touching, Emmy Award-winning 1987 HBO doc "Dear America: Letters Home From Vietnam")
NATIONAL
November 21, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Darwin Payne, 76, of Dallas, was among the crowd of reporters dispatched to cover the aftermath of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.  Now a professor emeritus of communications at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Payne discussed his memories of that day with the Los Angeles Times. He recounted the tense atmosphere surrounding Kennedy's visit, seeing Lee Harvey Oswald and interviewing Abraham Zapruder, who with his home movie camera captured the fatal shot. What did you think of Kennedy before he came to Dallas?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Among a fleet of documentaries launched on the 50th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy comes "Killing Kennedy," a dramatic take with Rob Lowe as the president and Will Rothhaar as Lee Harvey Oswald. Premiering Sunday on National Geographic Channel, it's based on a book by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard, one in a told-in-present-tense series that also includes "Killing Lincoln," already made into a National Geographic TV movie, and "Killing Jesus" - literary docudramas, if you will.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Brilliantly conceived and beautifully crafted, "Letters to Jackie: Remembering President Kennedy" may not only be one of the year's best documentaries but one of the year's finest overall films. The movie is based on readings of actual condolence letters sent to Jacqueline Kennedy after John F. Kennedy's assassination, read in voice-overs by celebrities. If that may sound a bit dreary or cliched, the result is anything but. Writer-director Bill Couturié (who made the touching, Emmy Award-winning 1987 HBO doc "Dear America: Letters Home From Vietnam")
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Rob Lowe made a major impression with viewers over the Memorial Day weekend playing Liberace's plastic surgeon in the HBO film "Behind the Candelabra. " Now he's following that up with another eye-catching role, as John F. Kennedy in National Geographic Channel's upcoming movie "Killing Kennedy. " The film is a follow-up to National Geographic Channel's "Killing Lincoln," based on the book by Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard, which became Nat Geo's highest-rated program to date when it aired in February.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2013
Kenneth Battelle, an influential hairstylist who created Jacqueline Kennedy's tousled bouffant and counted Marilyn Monroe and Lucille Ball among his many famous clients, died Sunday at his home in Wappingers Falls, N.Y. He was 86. His death was confirmed by the Kenneth salon he established in New York City in 1963. Known professionally simply as Kenneth, he started out as a New York stylist in 1950 at Helena Rubinstein's famous New York salon. After Kennedy became a client in 1954, she stayed with him throughout her White House years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2012 | Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Letitia Baldrige, an etiquette maven who served as social secretary to First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy and later wrote books and a syndicated column advising readers on good manners in contemporary America, has died. She was 86. Baldrige died Monday at a nursing facility in Bethesda, Md., said Mary M. Mitchell, a longtime friend and writing collaborator. Baldrige had severe osteoarthritis with cardiac complications. In 1960, Baldrige received a life-changing phone call from Jacqueline Kennedy, a friend from their days at a private girls' school in Connecticut, who asked if she could help out at the White House.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2004 | N.Y. Post via artsjournal
American Ballet Theatre has named its school after Jacqueline Kennedy.
NEWS
April 27, 2001 | ANNE BRATSKEIR
Forty years after her she became first lady and nearly seven years since her death, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis still inspires the world of fashion and style. Along with the hardcover catalog "Jacqueline Kennedy: The White House Years" by Hamish Bowles for the Metropolitan Museum of Art's new exhibit of the same title, there are three other new books: "Jackie: The Clothes of Camelot," by Jay Mulvaney (St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2011 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
When Rene Verdon became the first professional chef to work in the White House, in 1961, dining with the president was given an early 1800s spin: Outside caterers were replaced by an in-house operation that harked back to Thomas Jefferson's day. Suddenly, French food was fashionable, thanks to First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy's wish to entertain on a grand scale and Verdon's ability to deliver memorable chicken in champagne sauce and what Time magazine...
NATIONAL
January 26, 2011 | By Faye Fiore, Los Angeles Times
In the nation's collective memory, the assassination of John F. Kennedy is a clash of images and mysteries that may never be sorted out to the satisfaction of everyone. But if there is a lasting emblem that sums up Nov. 22, 1963, the day America tumbled from youthful idealism to hollow despair, it is Jacqueline Kennedy's rose-pink suit and pillbox hat. An expanded collection of Kennedy treasures and trivia was unveiled this month on exhibit and online to coincide with the 50th anniversary of JFK's inauguration; it includes the fabric of his top hat (beaver fur)
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