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Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis

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OPINION
May 22, 1994 | Chris Chase, Chris Chase is the co-author of "Josephine: The Hungry Heart" (Random House), a biography of Josephine Baker.
Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis died Thursday. Outside her Fifth Avenue apartment strangers gathered, strewed rose petals, lit candles. She was 64 and she had been a role model for thousands of women. She was loved by people she didn't know and who didn't know her. What they responded to was the image she presented. She was smart, brave, complicated and, one suspects, she understood that it was all--politics and fashion, Camelot and the pill-box hat--about image.
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NATIONAL
March 17, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
Rachel “Bunny” Lambert Mellon, the heiress, philanthropist and horticulturist who was a confidante of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and became a central figure in the trial of John Edwards by using her money to hide his mistress during his 2008 presidential campaign, has died at her Virginia estate. She was 103.  Her death was confirmed by her assistant, Tony Willis. Mellon was the granddaughter of the inventor of Listerine who gained even greater wealth when she married banking scion Paul Mellon.
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NEWS
May 20, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Although non-Hodgkin's lymphoma like that contracted by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis is normally considered one of the more curable cancers, nearly half of those who develop it die within five years. "Even in the best of (treatment) programs, one-third of patients don't respond well, and two-thirds ultimately die of the disease," said Dr. Rex Greene, chief of the cancer teaching program at Huntington Memorial Hospital in Pasadena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2011
Philip Matthew Hannan Cleric gave the eulogy for President Kennedy Retired New Orleans Archbishop Philip Matthew Hannan, 98, who sought to console a grieving nation in his eulogy for President Kennedy, died Thursday in New Orleans after a long period of decline, according to the archdiocese. Hannan was a young auxiliary bishop in Washington, D.C., when Jacqueline Kennedy asked him to deliver her husband's eulogy at the state funeral held three days after the president's assassination on Nov. 22, 1963.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | SUSAN BAER, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Friends said they were like an old married couple, comfortable and serene as they strolled through snowy Central Park or lolled by the shores of Martha's Vineyard on long summer weekends. In fact, when Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis died Thursday of cancer, the official statement named three "family members" who were by her bedside: her two children--Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg and John F. Kennedy Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1994
Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis is dead, and the grief that Americans feel is not just a grief for her and her family. What she stood for is something Americans obscurely yearn for. The word for it--more than taste or even grace--is dignity. No American old enough to remember the day will ever forget her ravaged nobility at the funeral of her husband, the slain President John F. Kennedy. Virtually the entire nation saw her whisper to her 3-year-old son that the moment had come for him to salute.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I must confess, if I never again hear the words "king," "queen," "dynasty" or "royalty" applied to prominent Americans, that day can't come too soon. For the citizens of a republic, expressly dedicated to the proposition that all men (and, let us hope, women) are created equal, to grovel and gush over individuals whose chief distinction is their celebrity or social position is not a healthy sign.
NEWS
November 6, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
She is forever frozen in time: the look of anguish etched on her face; her pillbox hat slightly askew on the bouffant hairdo; her suit, a color known then as Schiaparelli pink, stained with the blood of her fallen husband. That image from Nov. 22, 1963, said someone very close to her, "is burned in people's minds." Twenty-five years have passed since the glamorous young First Lady became the grieving young widow. On her next birthday, Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis will turn 60.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
The honorific "first lady of the United States" was first accorded to Dolly Madison, the erudite, charming and popular wife of our fourth president, though she earlier had acted as official White House hostess for his great friend, the widower Thomas Jefferson. Other first ladies since are recalled as embodying various permutations of their position, which is not an official office: Edith Wilson is remembered for her dubious overreaching during her husband's last, debilitating illness; Eleanor Roosevelt for her outspokenness and vigorous embrace of progressive causes; Nancy Reagan for her fierce loyalty and fashion; Laura Bush for her intelligence and dignity.
NEWS
June 12, 1994
I watched the graveside service for Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis; it was disgraceful that CNN had to have very long commercial breaks. Leila McDermott, Sylmar
OPINION
September 15, 2011
A newly released series of interviews with Jacqueline Kennedy, recorded in 1964, just months after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, offers an extraordinary and occasionally shocking glimpse of a woman enshrined in our popular culture as a figure of grace, fortitude and civility. In the conversations, the then-34-year-old widow reveals herself as variously audacious, narrow-minded and unsparingly tart. She called Indira Gandhi "a real prune — bitter, kind of pushy," and said she had told Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev at a dinner to stop boring her with statistics on Ukraine.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
The honorific "first lady of the United States" was first accorded to Dolly Madison, the erudite, charming and popular wife of our fourth president, though she earlier had acted as official White House hostess for his great friend, the widower Thomas Jefferson. Other first ladies since are recalled as embodying various permutations of their position, which is not an official office: Edith Wilson is remembered for her dubious overreaching during her husband's last, debilitating illness; Eleanor Roosevelt for her outspokenness and vigorous embrace of progressive causes; Nancy Reagan for her fierce loyalty and fashion; Laura Bush for her intelligence and dignity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2003 | Mark Swed
In 1971, the Kennedy Center in Washington opened with a new work for the National Symphony Orchestra by one of America's most popular composers that was influenced by the counterculture and that stretched the barriers of what symphonic music was thought to be, including by using electric guitar. Not everyone was exhilarated by this provocative new change in direction from Leonard Bernstein. Many found "Mass" messy, vulgar and over-the-top. The Nixon White House decided to sit this one out.
NATIONAL
July 20, 2003 | From Reuters
A pair of President John F. Kennedy's Navy boxer shorts sold for $5,000 at auction Saturday, while an online bidder for a personal notebook used during the 1960 presidential campaign thought her winning bid was for $2,250, not the actual high bid of $22,500. The auction featuring personal, campaign and other items belonging to the president and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis was conducted by Maryland-based Hantman's Auctioneers & Appraisers.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2003 | From Associated Press
Andy Warhol's "Jackie" works, a series of paintings and screen prints created between 1963 and 1968 that captured the moments before and after Jacqueline Kennedy was transformed from glamorous first lady to grieving widow, go on display in Dallas today. For the first time, the pieces will be displayed at the building from which the bullets that killed her husband, President John F. Kennedy, were fired in 1963: the former School Book Depository.
NEWS
April 27, 2001 | ANNE BRATSKEIR
Forty years after her she became first lady and nearly seven years since her death, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis still inspires the world of fashion and style. Along with the hardcover catalog "Jacqueline Kennedy: The White House Years" by Hamish Bowles for the Metropolitan Museum of Art's new exhibit of the same title, there are three other new books: "Jackie: The Clothes of Camelot," by Jay Mulvaney (St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1996
Re "High Prices at the Kennedy Auction," letters, May 1: I am not rich and I am not famous. However, I do have a bit of Camelot--$45 for the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis auction catalog. BEVERLY SCHREIBER
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
A private funeral service for Janet Jennings Auchincloss Rutherford, half-sister of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, was held here Tuesday. Mrs. Rutherford, daughter of Janet Lee Bouvier Auchincloss Morris and the late Hugh Dudley Auchincloss, died in Boston on March 13 of lung cancer. She was 39. Mrs. Morris, who is 77, is Mrs. Onassis' mother, while Auchincloss was her stepfather. Mrs. Rutherford graduated from Miss Porter's School in Farmington, Conn.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | BOOTH MOORE and VALLI HERMAN-COHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Forty years after her emergence as first lady, why does the world continue to be fascinated by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis' legendary style? A blockbuster exhibition, opening May 1 and continuing through July 29 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will explore her enduring influence through some 80 original costumes and accessories from her formal White House wardrobe as well as pieces worn during her husband's 1960 presidential campaign.
NEWS
November 27, 2000 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I must confess, if I never again hear the words "king," "queen," "dynasty" or "royalty" applied to prominent Americans, that day can't come too soon. For the citizens of a republic, expressly dedicated to the proposition that all men (and, let us hope, women) are created equal, to grovel and gush over individuals whose chief distinction is their celebrity or social position is not a healthy sign.
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