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Jacqueline Piatigorsky

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NEWS
November 8, 1988 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
For someone who claims that fear is the story of her life, Jacqueline Piatigorsky seems unintimidated by the incredibly heavy Carrara marble sculpture that needs to be moved. "Don't touch it," says the 77-year-old white-haired woman curtly as she eases her cumbersome, dusty work in progress from one platform to another. "You don't know how to handle it."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2012 | Elaine Woo
Jacqueline Piatigorsky was born into the Rothschild banking clan and grew up in a palace in Paris, but her silver spoon came with a ball and shackles. She rarely left her sumptuous homes and was dominated by a callous nanny. She felt invisible to her parents, who expected little of their sensitive, socially awkward daughter except to marry well. "I was a disappointment," she wrote, "a shrinking, misunderstood child. " She was also intensely competitive by nature -- and driven to be more than a poor little rich girl.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2012 | Elaine Woo
Jacqueline Piatigorsky was born into the Rothschild banking clan and grew up in a palace in Paris, but her silver spoon came with a ball and shackles. She rarely left her sumptuous homes and was dominated by a callous nanny. She felt invisible to her parents, who expected little of their sensitive, socially awkward daughter except to marry well. "I was a disappointment," she wrote, "a shrinking, misunderstood child. " She was also intensely competitive by nature -- and driven to be more than a poor little rich girl.
NEWS
November 8, 1988 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
For someone who claims that fear is the story of her life, Jacqueline Piatigorsky seems unintimidated by the incredibly heavy Carrara marble sculpture that needs to be moved. "Don't touch it," says the 77-year-old white-haired woman curtly as she eases her cumbersome, dusty work in progress from one platform to another. "You don't know how to handle it."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 1988 | MARLENA DONOHUE
Born to the Rothschild banking family, Jacqueline Piatigorsky turned an elite but brutal childhood into a Cinderella ending, marrying cellist Gregor Piatigorsky and becoming a mother, pilot, tennis champion, and sculptor. At 76, she has her second L.A. show, a collection of good-sized polished-to-a-sheen marble and alabaster sculptures of birds and non-representational, fluid knots that make allusions to physical or psychological states.
SPORTS
July 22, 2012 | By Claire Noland
Barbara Jean Carnegie Berwald, 94, the first wife of media and sports mogul Jack Kent Cooke whose record divorce settlement precipitated his sale of the Lakers, the Kings and the Forum to Jerry Buss, died of heart failure Friday at her home in Purchase, N.Y., her grandson John Kent Cooke Jr. said. She was born in 1917 in Port Perry, Canada, and soon after moved with her family to St. Catharines, also in the province of Ontario. She married Cooke in 1934, when she was 17 and he was a 21-year-old encyclopedia salesman bent on success.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1993 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
So widespread was the extent of Gregor Piatigorsky's generosity, the legendary cello virtuoso--who died at 73 in 1976--has left numerous awards, scholarships and honors with his name attached to them all over the musical countryside. The Russian-born virtuoso performed worldwide before settling in Los Angeles for the last 16 years of his life, teaching at USC beginning in 1962 until his death. Now, in 1993, yet another one has been launched.
SPORTS
April 9, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY
Forty-five years ago today, Branch Rickey's announcement that Jackie Robinson would join the Brooklyn Dodgers broke baseball's racial barrier. Or did it? According to Bruce Nash and Allan Zullo's "Believe it or Else," Moses Fleet Walker, who was black, played in 1884 for the Toledo Mudhens of the American Assn., which, at the time, was considered a major league. "Blacks were not that rare in organized baseball back then," Nash and Zullo write.
SPORTS
August 25, 1994 | DANA HADDAD
Men's tennis players in South Korea harbor no dreams of playing Wimbledon and the U.S. Open. Because the military conscripts them during their prime years, the country's outstanding players--on any level--are spurred only by a passion for the sport and an appetite for competition, according to Jung Kim, former coach of the South Korean men's national team. Looking for a good example? Take a team from Glendale called the Thursday Club, coached by Kim.
NEWS
June 4, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, Chris Pasles covers music and dance for The Times Orange County Edition.
The Corona del Mar Baroque Music Festival "began as an intimate festival experience," says music director Burton Karson, "and that's what it remains" as it approaches its 12th consecutive season. "We began with strong community support, and we have maintained it. I don't remember what our budget was 12 years ago, but I would guess it was $7,000 or $8,000. It's about $40,000 this year."
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | MARY LOU LOPER, Times Staff Writer
Major royalty always sends Los Angeles atwitter. Now that British Ambassador to the United States Sir Antony Acland has revealed that their royal highnesses, the Duke and Duchess of York (Prince Andrew and his bride, the former Miss Sarah Ferguson), will be coming to town sometime during the U.K./L.A. '88 "A Celebration of British Arts" events, the social calendar is starting to plump.
SPORTS
May 13, 1990 | THOMAS BONK
It figures that Monica Seles would be the daughter of a cartoonist. This 16-year-old, who laughs like Woody Woodpecker, named her dog Astro after the one on the "Jetsons" cartoon show and learned to punch two-fisted forehands at practices when her dad, Karolj, drew cartoon faces on the balls. For Seles, this made tennis fun and simple: "First I would hit Tom and then I would hit Jerry," she said. And now, Seles has hit No.
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