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Jacqueline Powers Doud

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2000 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Jacqueline Powers Doud stands out from earlier leaders of Mount St. Mary's College for something she is not: a nun. The decision to break from the college's 75-year tradition and pick a laywoman as its next president reflects a sister shortage that is changing the face of Catholic women's colleges throughout America. Only about a third of the nation's remaining 42 Catholic women's colleges are now run by nuns, said Sister Karen M. Kennelly, Mount St. Mary's outgoing president.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2000 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Jacqueline Powers Doud stands out from earlier leaders of Mount St. Mary's College for something she is not: a nun. The decision to break from the college's 75-year tradition and pick a laywoman as its next president reflects a sister shortage that is changing the face of Catholic women's colleges throughout America. Only about a third of the nation's remaining 42 Catholic women's colleges are now run by nuns, said Sister Karen M. Kennelly, Mount St. Mary's outgoing president.
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OPINION
May 31, 2009
Re "Poor would be hard hit by state cuts," May 22 The prospect of dismantling the CalGrant program is a major setback for California and its citizens. Without CalGrants, thousands of talented, deserving low-income students would be denied the individual and social benefits accruing from a college education. The public benefits of the college-educated, such as an increased tax base and a skilled workforce, would erode rapidly and permanently. What a devastating step backward it would be to eliminate CalGrants -- which have worked effectively for 50 years -- in a state that is already struggling to remain competitive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2004 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Sister Cecilia Louise Moore, the first woman to be appointed chancellor of the Catholic Archdiocese of Los Angeles, a job formerly held only by priests, died April 5. She was 75. A member of the religious order of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet for 58 years, Moore was diagnosed with cancer six years ago but had continued to work until recent months. She died at home at Daniel Murphy Convent in Los Angeles, according to Sister St. George, coordinator for the convent.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1990
Woodbury University's architecture program will take on a new staff design with the appointment of veteran architect Louis Naidorf as chairman. The architect, whose work ranges from architecture and urban design to research and design methods, succeeds Donald Conway. Naidorf, 61, who will take over the post June 18, is an architect at the Santa Monica architecture firm Ellerbe Becket and will continue working there part time.
NATIONAL
April 15, 2008 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
In a summons that is prompting both anticipation and unease, Pope Benedict XVI has asked the presidents of all U.S. Catholic colleges and universities, along with Catholic school superintendents from across the country, to meet with him this week during his East Coast visit. Will Benedict, who was viewed as the Vatican's "enforcer" of Roman Catholic orthodoxy before he became pope, chastise American educators for not adhering more strictly to traditional church teachings?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2009 | Claire Noland
Visitors to the Doheny Mansion, the opulent home of Los Angeles oil baron Edward Doheny and his wife, Estelle, that became part of Mount St. Mary's College's downtown campus, often marveled at the 1899 landmark's unusual features: the Louis Comfort Tiffany glass dome over the Pompeian Room, the eclectic facade melding Gothic, English Tudor and mission revival architectural styles and the gracious nun clad in a traditional black habit who greeted them and served them refreshments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2003 | William Lobdell, Times Staff Writer
Traditionalists have ignited a debate among Catholics over the selection of Congresswomen Loretta and Linda Sanchez -- both of whom favor abortion rights -- as Saturday's commencement speakers at a Catholic college in Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2005 | Stuart Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
For many California high school seniors and prospective transfer students, picking one of the state's private colleges has turned into a riskier option. The uncertainty stems from a provision in Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's proposed budget to cut maximum Cal Grants by 10.5% for low- and moderate-income students entering private colleges. It would be the second reduction in two years for new private college students and is intended to save $7.5 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2004 | Stuart Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
A little-noticed provision of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's proposed budget would slash more than $30 million in state grants to college students seeking financial aid to attend private schools. Administrators at California's private colleges and universities say the reduction in Cal Grants probably would divert many students to community colleges and public universities. It also could force private schools with meager endowments to cut admissions and services.
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