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Jacquelyn Swetnam

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1988 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles federal grand jury indicted a husband and wife Thursday for allegedly conspiring to smuggle pre-Columbian art into the country, officials said. David Rand Swetnam, 31, and Jacquelyn Swetnam, 30, former Santa Barbara art restorers, are charged with conspiracy, making false statements to U.S. Customs Service agents and receiving and procuring smuggled goods, according to Assistant U.S. Atty. Spurgeon Smith.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1988 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles federal grand jury indicted a husband and wife Thursday for allegedly conspiring to smuggle pre-Columbian art into the country, officials said. David Rand Swetnam, 31, and Jacquelyn Swetnam, 30, former Santa Barbara art restorers, are charged with conspiracy, making false statements to U.S. Customs Service agents and receiving and procuring smuggled goods, according to Assistant U.S. Atty. Spurgeon Smith.
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December 6, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Two former art dealers who operated in Santa Barbara pleaded not guilty Monday in Los Angeles to charges that they had valuable pre-Columbian artifacts smuggled into the United States from Peru. David and Jacquelyn Swetnam, who now live in Santa Cruz, pleaded not guilty to 10 counts of conspiracy, making false statements to the U. S. Customs Service and receipt of smuggled goods. Trial was scheduled for Jan. 31 before U.S. District Judge Richard Gadbois Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1988
The government of Peru won a court order Friday delaying the return of 80 seized pre-Columbian artifacts to their owners, contending that the items were stolen from Peru and should be returned to that country. Los Angeles U.S. District Judge Harry Hupp issued a temporary restraining order forcing the U.S. Customs Service to retain possession of the artifacts for up to one week, until another judge can decide the matter.
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