Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJacques
IN THE NEWS

Jacques

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1998 | JOHN CANALIS
Jacques was an unlikely neighborhood mascot. The papillon-terrier mix with imposing pointed ears weighed just 10 pounds, but his personality outweighed his poundage. With his 25-foot leash tied to a stake in the frontyard of his owner's Palm Street home, the black-and-tan dog played daily with about 50 visitors--and many of their pooches. He became known as a "greeter," "mood lifter" and "security guard."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"The Umbrellas of Cherbourg" does not look or sound like a film that is 50 years old. Digitally restored with unusual delicacy, it continues to charm and delight for the same reasons it did back in 1964. Winner of the Palme d'Or in Cannes and nominated for five Oscars, "Umbrellas" is a one-of-kind venture. Playing for a single week at the Nuart in West Los Angeles, this French film is unashamedly artificial yet strongly tethered to the real world of the coastal town in Normandy that gives it its name.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2010 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There's a kind of wicked irony around every corner in "The Good Heart," where nothing and everything turns out exactly as it should in this story of second chances and the duck that got away. The film stars Brian Cox and Paul Dano as two mismatched souls who end up in the same hospital room, both having barely cheated death and only one happy about it. But instead of two ships passing in the night, circumstances conspire to toss them into the same lifeboat, metaphorically speaking, of course, since the story unfolds mostly in a New York City dive bar of the seediest sort.
SPORTS
January 28, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Tight end Matthew Jacques of Encino Crespi has committed to Air Force.   Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1993 | LESLIE BERGER, Berger is a Times staff writer.
Even before the blessing of the wine--the Kiddush-- Rabbi Mika M. Weiss opened the Seder with a lecture. "Passover celebrates freedom from slavery," he said, plastic cup of grape juice in one hand and paperback Haggadah, a Passover prayer book, in the other. "You should appreciate your freedom--in spite of the fact you are here." At a ritual already rich in symbolism, the rabbi stated the obvious.
SPORTS
November 14, 1989 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Victor Davis, Canada's flamboyant Olympic gold-medal swimmer, died Monday from injuries incurred Saturday in an accident that Montreal police still are trying to unravel. Davis, 25, was pronounced dead at 11 a.m. PST, said Jacques Charbonneau, a spokesman for Notre Dame Hospital in Montreal. Doctors gave Davis little chance of surviving after suffering a severe skull fracture, brain and spinal damage and multiple bruises from being hit by a car.
SPORTS
May 17, 1987 | THOMAS FERRARO, United Press International
Joe Paterno shifts uncomfortably on the couch of his office at Penn State University and makes a confession about his holier-than-thou image. "It scares the heck out of me," booms the hallowed football coach. "Because I know I'm not that clean. Nobody is that clean." "I don't want to appear to be any more than I am," says Paterno, now speaking in a near whisper. "And that's a good, hard-working coach who is a decent guy, a family guy, who doesn't want to cheat." "I lose my temper sometimes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a strong expression of support for building the next generation of military jets at Palmdale's Plant 42, California's entire congressional delegation has signed a letter asking the Department of Defense to compare production costs there with costs at any other facility. The contract to build the Joint Strike Fighter could be worth up to $750 billion over 25 years and is expected to generate thousands of new jobs in the region where it is built. The Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jacques Villeret, a French actor popular for his comic roles, died Friday in a Paris hospital. He was 53. Villeret, who was known to suffer from diabetes as well as liver problems associated with alcoholism, won a Cesar, France's equivalent to an Oscar, in 1998 for "The Dinner Game."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1997
It was with sadness on June 26 that we heard of the death of the renowned scientist, oceanographer and author Jacques Cousteau. Cousteau visited Mission Viejo in the summer of 1981 to film a documentary series for PBS on the origin of whales. We were fortunate enough to be asked to serve as "background" for his filming, which was to take place at a location at the Upper Oso Dam in northern Mission Viejo. He was interested in the fossil evolution of whales, and because this is a rich area for marine fossils and was being intensely studied by paleontologists from the L.A. County Natural History Museum at the time, this site was chosen.
NEWS
March 29, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
This is getting crazy. According to Fine Wine Insider , thieves broke into the cellars of the prized Champagne house Jacques Selosse a week ago and made off with almost 4,000 bottles of Champagne -- more than Selosse sells in the entire United States in a year. The damage is estimated to be about 400,000 euros or $512,000. Jacques Selosse is one of Champagne's most coveted labels. Now run by Anselme Selosse, the firm's top Champagne is "Substance," which marries 20 vintages into a remarkable wine.
SPORTS
February 13, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge, under fire after the IOC's decision to drop wrestling from the Olympics on Tuesday, says he will meet with the head of wrestling's governing body to discuss ways the sport can fight to return to the Games. Rogge says he has talked to Raphael Martinetti, the president of international wrestling federation FILA, and they agreed they "would meet at the first opportunity to have discussions.” Rogge says he was encouraged FILA had “vowed to adapt the sport and vowed to fight" the decision.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
It was the only French film of the 1930s, Simone de Beauvoir reported, that she and Jean-Paul Sartre jointly admired, largely for "the fog of despair enveloping the entire film. " Yet it was banned by the Vichy government on moral grounds, accused of contributing to a national malaise that led to the German occupation and condemned by a French Catholic organization for telling "a profoundly demoralizing, somber story. " It's "Port of Shadows," one of the treasures of French cinema now newly restored to its original glory.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Romantic but pitiless, fearlessly emotional as well as edgy, "Rust and Bone" is a powerhouse. It's the kind of risky venture only a consummate filmmaker could manage, and then only with the help of actors who are daring and accomplished. With director Jacques Audiard in charge and Marion Cotillard and Matthias Schoenaerts as stars, all the pieces have fallen exactly into place. Although "Rust and Bone" is old fashioned and sentimental at its core, this film's idea of romance is not everyone's, and it's certainly not Jane Austen's.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
If French cinema still carries a reputation for talky chamber pieces of the bourgeoisie, here's a visceral slice of life in the raw: Whether it's the killer whales, the prominent Katy Perry song, the back-alley fighting or its unlikely romance set against day-to-day hardships in the South of France, the new "Rust and Bone" is imagistic and emotionally wrought, pushing into surprising territories. Director and co-writer Jacques Audiard's previous film, "A Prophet," was another high-pitched drama and was nominated for the foreign language Academy Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Though it has become axiomatic over the last few years that the audience for foreign-language films has been shrinking in America as superheroes dominate the box office, there have been a few recent signs of new life. Earlier this year the Iranian film "A Separation" was nominated for an Oscar not only in the foreign-language category (which it would go on to win) but also for its screenplay, where it competed against the likes of "Bridesmaids," pushing the film out from the margins of the art house.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1995
Re "Chirac Admits France's Complicity With Nazis," July 17: March, 1943: Seven people are denounced to the Gestapo in the south of France--mother, father, both 37; brother, age 9; uncle, aunt and their daughter, age 5; and I, age 16. May, 1945: I alone return after Auschwitz. A week or so later, a French woman who was renting us a cellar confesses to the crime; four people involved were tried, convicted and sentenced to five years in jail. Ingrained anti-Semitism and the greedy opportunity to get their hands on an old robe and an old pair of slippers had directly caused the death of six people.
SPORTS
July 25, 2001 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Ian Thorpe of Australia powered to his second world record in three days Tuesday in the World Championships at Fukuoka, Japan. Michael Phelps of the U.S. also smashed a world record, breaking his mark in the 200-meter butterfly with a time of 1:54.58. Thorpe's two records are his 10th and 11th in individual long-course events. He won three Olympic gold medals at Sydney, Australia, last year and already has three world titles at Fukuoka.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 2012 | Times staff and wire reports
Jacques Barzun, a courtly French American scholar with a bracing knowledge of Western civilization who helped found the field of cultural history and in his 90s wrote the epic if improbable bestseller "From Dawn to Decadence," has died. He was 104. Barzun, who taught for nearly 50 years at Columbia University, died Thursday in San Antonio, where he retired after seven decades in New York. His death was confirmed by his son-in-law, Garvin Parfit. Hailed as "one of the last thoroughgoing generalists," the historian and critic wrote dozens of books and hundreds of essays on topics that reflected a wide-ranging intellect.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|