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Jacques Audiard

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July 1, 2005 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Though he's directed only four features and is little known in this country, a case could be made for writer-director Jacques Audiard as France's most compelling, most visceral and exciting filmmaker. A case his latest film, the forceful "The Beat That My Heart Skipped," does nothing but strengthen.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The most quietly terrifying presence in film today belongs to a gray-haired, 64-year-old French actor with a Danish name. If you are familiar with Niels Arestrup's work, you don't need any convincing. If you're not, "You Will Be My Son" is all the persuading you'll need. Best known for his two films with Jacques Audiard, "A Prophet" and "The Beat That My Heart Skipped" - both of which won him Cesars for supporting actor - Arestrup has also appeared in Steven Spielberg's "War Horse" and, more recently, Belgian director Joachim Lafosse's grueling "Our Children.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Romantic but pitiless, fearlessly emotional as well as edgy, "Rust and Bone" is a powerhouse. It's the kind of risky venture only a consummate filmmaker could manage, and then only with the help of actors who are daring and accomplished. With director Jacques Audiard in charge and Marion Cotillard and Matthias Schoenaerts as stars, all the pieces have fallen exactly into place. Although "Rust and Bone" is old fashioned and sentimental at its core, this film's idea of romance is not everyone's, and it's certainly not Jane Austen's.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The less seriously the genial French comedy "Populaire" takes itself, the more amusing it is. Fortunately, with small exceptions, this film doesn't take itself very seriously at all. Nominated for five Cesars and a box-office hit in France, "Populaire" is, for the most part, the fluffiest of French light comedies, though its accomplished stars, Romain Duris and Déborah François, have previously made strong impressions in serious roles: Duris in...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Read My Lips" is a battle of wills and desires set in a thriller context, a violent meditation on the unlikely persistence of love, an investigation of a difficult and compelling relationship between two abused individuals seeking revenge for the unfairness of their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2009 | KENNETH TURAN, FILM CRITIC
Jacques Audiard is the best French writer-director most Americans have never heard of. His new picture, "A Prophet," is poised to change that. Made with the filmmaker's trademark emotional intensity and ability to elevate traditional genre material to exceptional heights, "A Prophet" is the most universally admired work of the Cannes Film Festival's opening week.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
The French film “Rust and Bone” has been picking up awards buzz ever since it first appeared earlier this year at the Cannes Film Festival and just recently received the top prize at the London Film Festival as well. It is perhaps no surprise that the film features a riveting performance by Marion Cotillard, who previously won an Oscar for her French-language performance in “La Vie en Rose,” so for many American audiences the real discovery of the film will be Belgian actor Matthias Schoenaerts.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2013 | Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The less seriously the genial French comedy "Populaire" takes itself, the more amusing it is. Fortunately, with small exceptions, this film doesn't take itself very seriously at all. Nominated for five Cesars and a box-office hit in France, "Populaire" is, for the most part, the fluffiest of French light comedies, though its accomplished stars, Romain Duris and Déborah François, have previously made strong impressions in serious roles: Duris in...
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
Following a Telluride tribute, Marion Cotillard arrived in Toronto on Thursday night for the festival premiere of French director Jacques Audiard's "Rust and Bone," a movie that wowed critics earlier this year at Cannes. Without revealing more than what's found in the trailer, Cotillard plays an orca whale trainer who, after losing her legs in an accident, begins an unlikely relationship with an unemployed bare-knuckle street brawler (Matthias Schoenaerts). Coming from the director of "A Prophet," the French-language film's melodrama and heightened emotions rate as something of a surprise, though hardly an unpleasant one. It's a movie full of passion and blunt force and fabulous acting from both of its leads.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Pitiless, devastating, unadorned, "Our Children" is an exceptional film that puts the worst, most painful part of its story on the screen first. Or so you will be tempted to think. Directed by Joachim Lafosse and starring three of Europe's top actors - Emilie Dequenne, Niels Arestrup and Tahar Rahim - this is a taut psychological study, based on a true story, of the complexities of personal power relationships that begins with the kind of shattering revelation that would be the conclusion of most films.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Pitiless, devastating, unadorned, "Our Children" is an exceptional film that puts the worst, most painful part of its story on the screen first. Or so you will be tempted to think. Directed by Joachim Lafosse and starring three of Europe's top actors - Emilie Dequenne, Niels Arestrup and Tahar Rahim - this is a taut psychological study, based on a true story, of the complexities of personal power relationships that begins with the kind of shattering revelation that would be the conclusion of most films.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
"Amour" won the Golden Globe for best foreign language film on Sunday night. Austria's "Amour" has been an art-house awards powerhouse since winning the top prize at last year's Cannes Film Festival. Director Michael Haneke won the Golden Globe for his previous film, "The White Ribbon," and "Amour" recently racked up an impressive five Oscar nominations as well. With strong performances by Emmanuelle Riva and Jean-Louis Trintignant, the film is a deeply felt, harrowing examination of an aging couple facing the end of life.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Romantic but pitiless, fearlessly emotional as well as edgy, "Rust and Bone" is a powerhouse. It's the kind of risky venture only a consummate filmmaker could manage, and then only with the help of actors who are daring and accomplished. With director Jacques Audiard in charge and Marion Cotillard and Matthias Schoenaerts as stars, all the pieces have fallen exactly into place. Although "Rust and Bone" is old fashioned and sentimental at its core, this film's idea of romance is not everyone's, and it's certainly not Jane Austen's.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
If French cinema still carries a reputation for talky chamber pieces of the bourgeoisie, here's a visceral slice of life in the raw: Whether it's the killer whales, the prominent Katy Perry song, the back-alley fighting or its unlikely romance set against day-to-day hardships in the South of France, the new "Rust and Bone" is imagistic and emotionally wrought, pushing into surprising territories. Director and co-writer Jacques Audiard's previous film, "A Prophet," was another high-pitched drama and was nominated for the foreign language Academy Award.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2012 | By Mark Olsen
The French film “Rust and Bone” has been picking up awards buzz ever since it first appeared earlier this year at the Cannes Film Festival and just recently received the top prize at the London Film Festival as well. It is perhaps no surprise that the film features a riveting performance by Marion Cotillard, who previously won an Oscar for her French-language performance in “La Vie en Rose,” so for many American audiences the real discovery of the film will be Belgian actor Matthias Schoenaerts.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Though it has become axiomatic over the last few years that the audience for foreign-language films has been shrinking in America as superheroes dominate the box office, there have been a few recent signs of new life. Earlier this year the Iranian film "A Separation" was nominated for an Oscar not only in the foreign-language category (which it would go on to win) but also for its screenplay, where it competed against the likes of "Bridesmaids," pushing the film out from the margins of the art house.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
"Amour" won the Golden Globe for best foreign language film on Sunday night. Austria's "Amour" has been an art-house awards powerhouse since winning the top prize at last year's Cannes Film Festival. Director Michael Haneke won the Golden Globe for his previous film, "The White Ribbon," and "Amour" recently racked up an impressive five Oscar nominations as well. With strong performances by Emmanuelle Riva and Jean-Louis Trintignant, the film is a deeply felt, harrowing examination of an aging couple facing the end of life.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The most quietly terrifying presence in film today belongs to a gray-haired, 64-year-old French actor with a Danish name. If you are familiar with Niels Arestrup's work, you don't need any convincing. If you're not, "You Will Be My Son" is all the persuading you'll need. Best known for his two films with Jacques Audiard, "A Prophet" and "The Beat That My Heart Skipped" - both of which won him Cesars for supporting actor - Arestrup has also appeared in Steven Spielberg's "War Horse" and, more recently, Belgian director Joachim Lafosse's grueling "Our Children.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp
Following a Telluride tribute, Marion Cotillard arrived in Toronto on Thursday night for the festival premiere of French director Jacques Audiard's "Rust and Bone," a movie that wowed critics earlier this year at Cannes. Without revealing more than what's found in the trailer, Cotillard plays an orca whale trainer who, after losing her legs in an accident, begins an unlikely relationship with an unemployed bare-knuckle street brawler (Matthias Schoenaerts). Coming from the director of "A Prophet," the French-language film's melodrama and heightened emotions rate as something of a surprise, though hardly an unpleasant one. It's a movie full of passion and blunt force and fabulous acting from both of its leads.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2011 | By Mark Olsen, Special to the Los Angeles Times
With his debut feature, 1999's "Crane World," a gritty slice-of-life about a day laborer in Buenos Aires, Pablo Trapero first demonstrated his facility for transcending the conventions of genre. With his latest, "Carancho," which played at last year's Cannes Film Festival and opened in Los Angeles on Friday, he's again looking to infuse genre storytelling with a beating human heart. In this case, the director says, his film, which charts the relationship between a down-on-his-luck lawyer and an emergency room doctor, began life in his mind as an unlikely love story.
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