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Jacques Benveniste

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NEWS
July 27, 1988
Jacques Benveniste's work involved a technique that is used in Europe--but not in the United States--to determine if an individual is allergic to specific chemicals such as ragweed dust and pollen. White blood cells called basophils from the person to be tested are combined in a test tube with the chemical thought to be causing the reaction. If the tested person is allergic to the chemical, the basophils will interact with it and be changed so that they can no longer be stained by a certain dye.
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NEWS
July 27, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
A highly unusual inquiry by a respected scientific journal has precipitated an international shouting match between a group of French researchers and the journal team that is investigating them. In a display of public anger rarely seen in the scientific world, the researchers in question, headed by Jacques Benveniste of INSERM, the French equivalent of the U.S.
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NEWS
June 30, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Dr. Jacques Benveniste has an "unbelievable" problem. The French allergist has produced experimental results that other scientists find difficult, if not impossible, to believe. In essence, he has observed a biological effect produced by solutions so dilute that, theoretically, they contain nothing that could cause the effect. Taken at face value, the work suggests that the solution has some form of bizarre "memory" of substances that it once contained.
NEWS
July 27, 1988
Jacques Benveniste's work involved a technique that is used in Europe--but not in the United States--to determine if an individual is allergic to specific chemicals such as ragweed dust and pollen. White blood cells called basophils from the person to be tested are combined in a test tube with the chemical thought to be causing the reaction. If the tested person is allergic to the chemical, the basophils will interact with it and be changed so that they can no longer be stained by a certain dye.
NEWS
July 27, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
A highly unusual inquiry by a respected scientific journal has precipitated an international shouting match between a group of French researchers and the journal team that is investigating them. In a display of public anger rarely seen in the scientific world, the researchers in question, headed by Jacques Benveniste of INSERM, the French equivalent of the U.S.
OPINION
August 7, 1988
The recent controversy over the publication by the British science magazine Nature of seemingly impossible results says much about science, scientists and the scientific method. The brouhaha erupted a few weeks ago when Nature, one of the world's most respected science journals, published a research paper by Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2009 | Thomas H. Maugh II
John Maddox, a former physics lecturer and science journalist whose 22 years as editor of Nature transformed the moss-covered journal into one of the world's leading sources of science information, has died. He was 83. Maddox died April 12 in Abergavenny, Wales, of a chest infection and pneumonia after a bout with a broken hip.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | STEFI WEISBURD, Weisburd is a free - lance science and medicine writer living in Albuquerque. and
For as long as she can remember, 35-year-old Virginia Schultz has been plagued by asthma, sinus infections and allergies. For years she survived woozily on cocktails of antihistamines, decongestants and steroids. She endured unusually long regimens of allergy shots, which twice sent her into anaphylactic shock. Then came a hellacious string of sinus infections, which stubbornly resisted antibiotics. Her doctor told her there was nothing else he could do. "I was desperate," said Schultz, co-owner of a public relations firm in Albuquerque, N.M. "I felt I didn't have any options left."
NEWS
June 30, 1988 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
Dr. Jacques Benveniste has an "unbelievable" problem. The French allergist has produced experimental results that other scientists find difficult, if not impossible, to believe. In essence, he has observed a biological effect produced by solutions so dilute that, theoretically, they contain nothing that could cause the effect. Taken at face value, the work suggests that the solution has some form of bizarre "memory" of substances that it once contained.
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