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Jacques Cousteau

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Help Me, Jacques Cousteau Gil Adamson Anansi/Toronto: 198 pp., $15.95 "In case we have to abandon ship, my mother has packed an emergency kit: Band-Aids, rubbing alcohol, scizzors, stomach remedies, a small mouldy package of cookies.... We are heading for the equator in a headlong rush." "Help Me, Jacques Cousteau" was first published in 1997, 10 years before Gil Adamson's second novel, "The Outlander," but didn't get the attention it deserves. Reminiscent of Alexandra Fuller's "Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight," it is a novel up to its eyeballs in quirk.
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NEWS
October 5, 2012
If you seek the true definition of luxury, look no further than Villa del Palmar at the Islands of Loreto in this amazing Southern Baja village.  The perfect place for everyone from honeymooners to large families, the resort offers a huge variety of outdoor amenities, from extravagant to exciting, all accessible right at the resort's doorstep. Just 250 miles north of Cabo San Lucas, the resort's suites all have spectacular views of the Sea of Cortez, which Jacques Cousteau called “the world's aquarium” thanks to its sparkling turquoise water and prolific marine and bird life.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1997
It was with sadness on June 26 that we heard of the death of the renowned scientist, oceanographer and author Jacques Cousteau. Cousteau visited Mission Viejo in the summer of 1981 to film a documentary series for PBS on the origin of whales. We were fortunate enough to be asked to serve as "background" for his filming, which was to take place at a location at the Upper Oso Dam in northern Mission Viejo. He was interested in the fossil evolution of whales, and because this is a rich area for marine fossils and was being intensely studied by paleontologists from the L.A. County Natural History Museum at the time, this site was chosen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 2010 | Los Angeles Times staff reports
Marshall Flaum, an award-winning producer, director and writer who specialized in documentaries, died Friday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles of complications after hip surgery, his family said. He was 85. Flaum won five Emmy Awards, had several more nominations and was twice nominated for an Academy Award, for the documentaries "The Yanks Are Coming (1963) and "Let My People Go: the Story of Israel" (1965). Flaum wrote, directed and produced both documentaries.
OPINION
October 1, 1995 | Scott Kraft, Scott Kraft is Paris bureau chief for The Times. He interviewed Jacques Cousteau in the oceanographer's Paris office
Jacques Cousteau had risen at 4 a.m. to polish a speech and then spent the day in the editing room, working on yet another documentary. It was after sunset when the 85-year-old French oceanographer emerged, but the night was young. "The day rarely ends before 11 p.m.," he said. "I have a dinner tonight at 9:30 until I-don't-know-when with the director-general of UNESCO."
NEWS
June 26, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Jacques-Yves Cousteau, the ageless old man of the seas who invented ways for men and women to live beneath the water and then took the rest of the human race there vicariously via his spectacular films and television documentaries, died Wednesday in Paris. The French-born oceanographer had been ill for months. Cousteau's wife, Francine, said he died at home before dawn after suffering a respiratory infection and heart problems.
NEWS
April 16, 1986 | Associated Press
The city has scrapped plans to build a $24.7-million Cousteau Ocean Center on its downtown waterfront because of a lack of private donations and eroding public support, the mayor said Tuesday. The center, proposed six years ago, would have displayed the work of French undersea explorer Capt. Jacques Cousteau using Disney-like special effects. The Cousteau Society projected that the center would draw 650,000 visitors a year.
NEWS
January 26, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Oceanographer Jacques Cousteau's research vessel Calypso, which sank Jan. 8 after being hit by a barge, was dragged from Singapore's murky waters for repairs at a local shipyard. A small hole was patched, and the ship was floating. The Calypso, which arrived in Singapore after a research and filming mission in China and Vietnam in 1994, was awaiting its next expedition to China when it was hit by the barge.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
Explorer Jean-Michel Cousteau, 65, has set off on a six-week filmmaking expedition to the northwestern Hawaiian Islands, carrying on his father's legacy of bringing images of far-flung places into the homes of millions. Cousteau and his 19-member crew will film a public television special, "Voyage to Kure," expected to air in fall 2004. His work continues the tradition of his father, Jacques Cousteau, who died in 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2010 | By Susan Salter Reynolds, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Help Me, Jacques Cousteau Gil Adamson Anansi/Toronto: 198 pp., $15.95 "In case we have to abandon ship, my mother has packed an emergency kit: Band-Aids, rubbing alcohol, scizzors, stomach remedies, a small mouldy package of cookies.... We are heading for the equator in a headlong rush." "Help Me, Jacques Cousteau" was first published in 1997, 10 years before Gil Adamson's second novel, "The Outlander," but didn't get the attention it deserves. Reminiscent of Alexandra Fuller's "Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight," it is a novel up to its eyeballs in quirk.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
Explorer Jean-Michel Cousteau, 65, has set off on a six-week filmmaking expedition to the northwestern Hawaiian Islands, carrying on his father's legacy of bringing images of far-flung places into the homes of millions. Cousteau and his 19-member crew will film a public television special, "Voyage to Kure," expected to air in fall 2004. His work continues the tradition of his father, Jacques Cousteau, who died in 1997.
MAGAZINE
May 6, 2001 | DIANNE BATES, Dianne Bates is a regular contributor to The Times
The name "Cousteau" is traditionally associated with the men of the family: Jacques, the patriarch and worldwide symbol of marine exploration, who died in 1997, and sons Philippe, who died in 1979, and Jean-Michel, head of Ocean Futures and owner of a Fiji Islands adventure resort. Now Jacques' 25-year-old granddaughter, Alexandra, is poised to claim a piece of the Cousteau legend. She's not the first female Cousteau to devote her life to the ocean.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1997 | DOUGLAS MUIR, Douglas Muir is a suspense novelist who teaches part time at Saddleback College and Irvine Valley College
Jacques Yves Cousteau was truly a giant on the world's stage. As one of the lucky ones who worked for this icon, I remember him as a rare, complex individual, a tough boss but a fair one. Cousteau was a deep thinker, and his body language reflected this. In lighter moments, there was that special twinkle in his eye when he mulled over some secret, humorous thought. To many, Jacques Cousteau in the flesh appeared slight of stature, almost frail. The truth was, he was wiry and plenty tough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1997
It was with sadness on June 26 that we heard of the death of the renowned scientist, oceanographer and author Jacques Cousteau. Cousteau visited Mission Viejo in the summer of 1981 to film a documentary series for PBS on the origin of whales. We were fortunate enough to be asked to serve as "background" for his filming, which was to take place at a location at the Upper Oso Dam in northern Mission Viejo. He was interested in the fossil evolution of whales, and because this is a rich area for marine fossils and was being intensely studied by paleontologists from the L.A. County Natural History Museum at the time, this site was chosen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1997
As one of his sons put it, Jacques Cousteau, who died Wednesday in Paris at 87, was "the best ambassador that France has ever had." But he was also the oceans' best ambassador. For, while more than two-thirds of the Earth's surface is water, we knew relatively little about that part of the planet before Cousteau. Cousteau modestly described himself as an "oceanographic technician."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Jean-Michel Cousteau, son of pioneer ocean explorer Jacques Cousteau, previewed his new film on the Alaska oil spill Wednesday night and called for industry to advance beyond the "Stone Age of cleanup technology." The 40-minute film, titled "Outrage at Valdez" and narrated by the younger Cousteau, is scheduled to be broadcast March 25, the day after the first anniversary of the worst oil spill in U.S. history.
BUSINESS
October 8, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
International environmentalist Jacques Cousteau called today for a permanent ban on mining in Antarctica, which he said would destroy "this last unspoiled continent of the planet." The captain of the Calypso also wants the creation of the first international nature reserve to protect Antarctica from development and pollution, ban all military activities but allow scientific research.
NEWS
June 26, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Jacques-Yves Cousteau, the ageless old man of the seas who invented ways for men and women to live beneath the water and then took the rest of the human race there vicariously via his spectacular films and television documentaries, died Wednesday in Paris. The French-born oceanographer had been ill for months. Cousteau's wife, Francine, said he died at home before dawn after suffering a respiratory infection and heart problems.
NEWS
June 26, 1997 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The influential in France tend to be a close-knit group, ready to exchange favors and slow to criticize members of the club. So it was no surprise when, six years ago at age 81, the famed oceanographer Jacques Cousteau asked then-Paris Mayor Jacques Chirac to officiate at his wedding to Francine, his companion of more than a decade. What was shocking--and perfectly in character for Cousteau--was the way Cousteau turned on Chirac just four years later, in 1995.
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