Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJacques Derrida
IN THE NEWS

Jacques Derrida

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
October 14, 2004
In response to Crispin Sartwell's Oct. 12 Commentary article about the great, late philosopher Jacques Derrida: It is interesting that some of Derrida's fierce critics interpret his work as that of an "antichrist," devoid of truth, etc. Derrida's philosophic approach to words, called "deconstructive method," was to show that words are the product of, and therefore fall short of, the source/creator of the words. This philosophy is in line with many scriptural teachings: "In the beginning God created.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2007 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
Chalk one up for the dead French philosopher. Three years after professional thinker Jacques Derrida reneged on a promise to donate his scholarly papers to UC Irvine, school officials have dropped their lawsuit against his estate. As part of a deal announced Monday, UCI also agreed to pay Derrida's widow $16,000 for her legal fees. Under the pact, the university will keep the Derrida archives it already has, which cover a period from 1946 to 1998, but give up any claim to the rest.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2004 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Jacques Derrida, the influential French thinker and writer who inspired admiration, vilification and utter bewilderment as the founder of the intellectual movement known as deconstruction, has died. He was 74. Derrida died Friday at a Paris hospital of complications from pancreatic cancer, French radio reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2007 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
Facing a backlash from scholars worldwide, UC Irvine says it will drop a lawsuit against the widow and children of professor and philosopher Jacques Derrida, the acclaimed founder of the intellectual movement called deconstruction. Instead, UCI officials said they had resumed negotiations with Derrida's family over control of his groundbreaking scholarly work.
MAGAZINE
July 21, 1991 | Mitchell Stephens, Mitchell Stephens is a journalism professor at New York University and the author of "A History of News" (Penguin).
THE WORLD'S MOST CONTROVERSIAL LIVING philosopher, arguably its most controversial living thinker, is sitting at a concrete picnic table at an outdoor snack bar at UC Irvine. Few of the undergraduates who stroll by in jams or jeans seem to notice Jacques Derrida, with his carefully tailored gray suit and purple tie. Few would recognize his name if they were introduced.
BOOKS
July 12, 1987 | Sara E. Melzer, Melzer is associate professor of French at UCLA. She is the author of "Discourses of the Fall: A Study of Pascal's Pensees" (University of California Press).
E. D. Hirsch, in his recent best-selling book, "Cultural Literacy," codifies 5,000 items one must know to be culturally literate. Jacques Derrida, one of the most important theoretical thinkers of the last two decades, should certainly figure on this list. But neither he, nor the philosophical position "deconstruction" associated with his name, are included.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2004 | Raphael Simon, Special to The Times
Each spring until the last, for nearly 20 years, Jacques Derrida left Paris to lecture at UC Irvine. The Orange County planned community couldn't help but seem an unlikely home for a radical French intellectual. And yet, as a graduate student at UC Irvine, I always thought Derrida's presence there made a kind of sense. The epicenter of the Orange County housing boom, Irvine is constantly being destroyed and re-created.
MAGAZINE
August 25, 1991
There is something that your article on Jacques Derrida and his deconstructionist philosophy ("Deconstructing Jacques Derrida," July 21) seems to overlook: What we call "spirituality" often means the feeling of joy we experience when we discover to our surprise that there are helpful, beneficial and supportive elements in the external world. Deconstruction ignores or deprecates this aspect of our world, focusing instead on the unreliable, the ambiguous and the indifferent. Human life could not exist without the supportive, the congenial and the trustworthy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1986
UCI Adds Noted Professor: Jacques Derrida, a noted French philosopher, is joining the faculty at UC Irvine, the university announced. Derrida, who is currently director of studies at Ecole des Hautes en Sciences Sociales in Paris, will begin teaching French and comparative literature at UCI next spring. Derrida is associated with a literary movement known as deconstruction. But Derrida's work also covers such fields as linguistics, history, art criticism, anthropolgy and psychoanalysis.
BOOKS
August 9, 1987
I'm an amateur here, but I've been trying to figure out what's so special about deconstruction. Sara Melzer's article on Jacques Derrida (The Book Review, July 12) has helped me see why this has been so much work. Apparently deconstruction, insofar as it is comprehensible, is so unilluminating as to be trivially true. Melzer writes: ". . . (T)he words in a given system may appear to correspond to an essential and universal meaning outside the system. . . . But in fact, on (Derrida's)
OPINION
January 9, 2005
The death of Susan Sontag on Dec. 29 unleashed the greatest volume of intellectual and pseudo-intellectual eulogizing since ... well, since the death of Jacques Derrida on Oct. 8. So which celebrity thinker fared best in 2004's excessively polysyllabic Obituary Bowl? Compiled by Michael Soller * Born * Sontag: New York, Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2004 | Raphael Simon, Special to The Times
Each spring until the last, for nearly 20 years, Jacques Derrida left Paris to lecture at UC Irvine. The Orange County planned community couldn't help but seem an unlikely home for a radical French intellectual. And yet, as a graduate student at UC Irvine, I always thought Derrida's presence there made a kind of sense. The epicenter of the Orange County housing boom, Irvine is constantly being destroyed and re-created.
OPINION
October 14, 2004
In response to Crispin Sartwell's Oct. 12 Commentary article about the great, late philosopher Jacques Derrida: It is interesting that some of Derrida's fierce critics interpret his work as that of an "antichrist," devoid of truth, etc. Derrida's philosophic approach to words, called "deconstructive method," was to show that words are the product of, and therefore fall short of, the source/creator of the words. This philosophy is in line with many scriptural teachings: "In the beginning God created.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2004 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Jacques Derrida, the influential French thinker and writer who inspired admiration, vilification and utter bewilderment as the founder of the intellectual movement known as deconstruction, has died. He was 74. Derrida died Friday at a Paris hospital of complications from pancreatic cancer, French radio reported.
MAGAZINE
August 25, 1991
There is something that your article on Jacques Derrida and his deconstructionist philosophy ("Deconstructing Jacques Derrida," July 21) seems to overlook: What we call "spirituality" often means the feeling of joy we experience when we discover to our surprise that there are helpful, beneficial and supportive elements in the external world. Deconstruction ignores or deprecates this aspect of our world, focusing instead on the unreliable, the ambiguous and the indifferent. Human life could not exist without the supportive, the congenial and the trustworthy.
MAGAZINE
July 21, 1991 | Mitchell Stephens, Mitchell Stephens is a journalism professor at New York University and the author of "A History of News" (Penguin).
THE WORLD'S MOST CONTROVERSIAL LIVING philosopher, arguably its most controversial living thinker, is sitting at a concrete picnic table at an outdoor snack bar at UC Irvine. Few of the undergraduates who stroll by in jams or jeans seem to notice Jacques Derrida, with his carefully tailored gray suit and purple tie. Few would recognize his name if they were introduced.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|