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October 18, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
One hundred and ninety-one years after it was created, a year after heirs of the original owner decided to sell it at auction, four months after the Los Angeles County Museum of Art snapped it up for $2.7 million, Jacques-Louis David's "Portrait of Jean-Pierre Delahaye" is making its public debut. The startlingly realistic painting of a white-haired attorney with an equivocal gaze is the centerpiece of a small exhibition opening Thursday at LACMA.
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January 25, 2008 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Just about the only thing missing from the exhibition "Some Paintings" is an exclamation mark at the title's end. A whopping 81 paintings by 80 artists, most made recently; here is a show that wants to make a point. And it does, with wit, verve and considerable taste. If the taste is not always mine, or yours -- well, that seems to be part of the point.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2008 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Just about the only thing missing from the exhibition "Some Paintings" is an exclamation mark at the title's end. A whopping 81 paintings by 80 artists, most made recently; here is a show that wants to make a point. And it does, with wit, verve and considerable taste. If the taste is not always mine, or yours -- well, that seems to be part of the point.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
One hundred and ninety-one years after it was created, a year after heirs of the original owner decided to sell it at auction, four months after the Los Angeles County Museum of Art snapped it up for $2.7 million, Jacques-Louis David's "Portrait of Jean-Pierre Delahaye" is making its public debut. The startlingly realistic painting of a white-haired attorney with an equivocal gaze is the centerpiece of a small exhibition opening Thursday at LACMA.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2005 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
A rudimentary description of Jacques-Louis David, the Neoclassical artistic genius, casts him as the chief image maker along the Enlightenment road to the French Revolution. He's the one whose Greco-Roman parables of noble civic duty and wrenching personal sacrifice to national ideals, painted as grand episodes from historical theater, so impressed Thomas Jefferson when the American went to Paris in the 1780s.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art snagged the top item in a Paris auction, paying $2.7 million for a portrait by Jacques-Louis David on Thursday at Christie's. "Portrait of Jean-Pierre Delahaye" -- a dramatic painting of a white-haired, white-shirted gentleman on a dark background -- was the star attraction in a $9-million sale of 155 Old Master and 19th century paintings. "It's a very big deal for us," said LACMA Director Michael Govan.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The J. Paul Getty Museum paid $4 million Tuesday for a painting by the 19th-Century French artist Jacques-Louis David that sold for less than $4,000 in 1950. Bidding for "Farewell of Telemachus and Eucharis"--called by Sotheby's New York auctioneers "the most important 19th-Century painting to be offered for sale in America in a generation"--began at $1 million and progressed in less than a minute to the final record bid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Charles Bierer Wrightsman, a retired oil executive turned philanthropist whose homes contained some of the important private art collections in the world, has died at the age of 90. Wrightsman, a benefactor and trustee of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art for three decades, died Tuesday at his Manhattan home. He also maintained homes in London and Palm Beach, Fla., where he often was host to President John F. Kennedy.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Janet Kinosian
There's no arguing that Tom Hooper's "Les Misérables" is a big film. It is based on both a very big book by Victor Hugo and a stage version that has been seen by 60 million people in 42 countries. It is a tale of big ideas and social upheavals. The film runs more than 21/2 hours, and it sports a cast of more than 200 credited roles and masses of extras. And it was definitely a big job for costume designer Paco Delgado, who had to create approximately 2,200 costumes for a time period that spanned much of the first half of the 19th century.
NEWS
November 10, 1994 | BETTY GOODWIN
The Movie: "Interview With the Vampire" The Setup: Vampires Lestat (Tom Cruise, pictured at left) and Louis (Brad Pitt, pictured at right) embark on two centuries of night-prowling bloodsucking, based on Anne Rice bestseller. After a few decades, a "daughter," Claudia (Kirsten Dunst), joins in their ravenous escapades. The Costume Designer: London-based Sandy Powell, whose credits include "Orlando," "The Crying Game" and "Caravaggio."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 23, 2006 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County Museum of Art snagged the top item in a Paris auction, paying $2.7 million for a portrait by Jacques-Louis David on Thursday at Christie's. "Portrait of Jean-Pierre Delahaye" -- a dramatic painting of a white-haired, white-shirted gentleman on a dark background -- was the star attraction in a $9-million sale of 155 Old Master and 19th century paintings. "It's a very big deal for us," said LACMA Director Michael Govan.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2005 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
A rudimentary description of Jacques-Louis David, the Neoclassical artistic genius, casts him as the chief image maker along the Enlightenment road to the French Revolution. He's the one whose Greco-Roman parables of noble civic duty and wrenching personal sacrifice to national ideals, painted as grand episodes from historical theater, so impressed Thomas Jefferson when the American went to Paris in the 1780s.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
A lot of yelling has gone on, here and elsewhere, about established artists leaping on the Post-Modernist bandwagon out of venal motives. There are certainly such characters, but the lemming-like universality of the trend is beginning to feel as much like historical inevitability as mere opportunism. It has happened in the past. The tough Spanish realist Francisco Zurbaran had to soften his style to meet the popularity of the sentimental Murillo.
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