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Jacques Nasser

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BUSINESS
April 11, 2001 | From Reuters
Ford Motor Co. disclosed Tuesday that Chief Executive and President Jacques Nasser earned $12.1 million last year as he grappled with the crisis that erupted over deaths and injuries in rollovers of the popular Explorer sport-utility vehicle. The figure, which included salary, bonus and other compensation, marked a nearly 19% increase in compensation for Nasser compared with 1999, when he earned $10.2 million in his first year as president and CEO of the world's No. 2 auto maker.
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BUSINESS
November 12, 2002 | From Reuters
Jacques Nasser, the former Ford Motor Co. chief executive who was ousted last year after a stormy 34-month reign as head of the world's No. 2 automaker, was named head of Bank One Corp.'s venture capital unit Monday. Nasser, 54, will work in Detroit at the bank's One Equity Partners arm to find, evaluate and make investments worldwide. Chicago-based Bank One, the No. 6 U.S. banking group, has about a $3.7-billion venture capital portfolio.
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BUSINESS
July 27, 2001 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of bad news and billions of dollars spent on the Firestone tire crisis, Ford Motor Co. realigned the relationship of its two top executives Thursday to put more power in the hands of family scion William Clay Ford Jr. The move confirms longtime rumors of a management shift that would more deeply involve the 44-year-old chairman, a great-grandson of company founder Henry Ford, in corporate decisions that have been dominated by 53-year-old President and Chief Executive Jacques Nasser.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2002 | Associated Press
Jacques Nasser, ousted Ford Motor Co. president and chief executive, was paid $4.9 million for 2001 even though he retired under pressure in October, according to a proxy statement. Nasser's pay included $1.75million in salary and nearly $3.1 million in other compensation. He also received options to buy 1.375 million shares of common stock that Ford valued at $12.9 million when granted. Nasser is receiving an annual pension of $1.6million to $1.
BUSINESS
April 10, 2002 | Associated Press
Jacques Nasser, ousted Ford Motor Co. president and chief executive, was paid $4.9 million for 2001 even though he retired under pressure in October, according to a proxy statement. Nasser's pay included $1.75million in salary and nearly $3.1 million in other compensation. He also received options to buy 1.375 million shares of common stock that Ford valued at $12.9 million when granted. Nasser is receiving an annual pension of $1.6million to $1.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2000
Ford Chief Executive Jacques Nasser would like to reassure us that nothing is more important to Ford than the public's safety, while laying the blame for so many Ford Explorer accidents squarely at the feet of the defective manufacture of Firestone's tires ["More Deaths Are Linked to Faulty Tires," Sept. 1]. The Times has performed a most useful service in making public the controversy that occurred at Ford 11 years ago, when engineers knew without a doubt that the about-to-be-introduced Ford Explorer was dangerously prone to rollovers when the vehicles' tires were inflated to Firestone's recommended pressures.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2002 | From Reuters
Jacques Nasser, the former Ford Motor Co. chief executive who was ousted last year after a stormy 34-month reign as head of the world's No. 2 automaker, was named head of Bank One Corp.'s venture capital unit Monday. Nasser, 54, will work in Detroit at the bank's One Equity Partners arm to find, evaluate and make investments worldwide. Chicago-based Bank One, the No. 6 U.S. banking group, has about a $3.7-billion venture capital portfolio.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2001 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Ford strode to the podium at Ford Motor Co.'s auditorium Tuesday to thunderous applause, an American flag at either side of the stage, with stars-and-stripes designs on the walls. Employees, packed well beyond the room's 470-seat capacity, gave the fresh-faced 44-year-old a raucous standing ovation. "Gee, it's like the Lions won a game," Ford quipped, referring to the forlorn 0-6 record of the Detroit professional football team his family owns. So began William Clay Ford Jr.'
BUSINESS
June 6, 2001 | DORON LEVIN, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Ford Motor Co. Chief Executive Jacques Nasser said the auto maker's directors are "extremely supportive" of him and rejected reports that the company may reshuffle top managers because of a tire safety probe or Ford's slipping performance in a quality survey. The CEO's performance has been watched closely since Bridgestone/Firestone Inc. recalled 6.5 million tires in August after reports of fatal accidents, many involving the Ford Explorer, the best-selling sport-utility vehicle.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2001 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ford Motor Co. Chief Executive Jacques Nasser--who has suffered more than a year of humiliation and criticism with the Firestone tire crisis, shrinking profit and market share and quality problems that have plagued his company's vehicles--has been fired and will be replaced by Chairman William Clay Ford Jr., a source familiar with the company's plan said late Monday.
BUSINESS
October 31, 2001 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bill Ford strode to the podium at Ford Motor Co.'s auditorium Tuesday to thunderous applause, an American flag at either side of the stage, with stars-and-stripes designs on the walls. Employees, packed well beyond the room's 470-seat capacity, gave the fresh-faced 44-year-old a raucous standing ovation. "Gee, it's like the Lions won a game," Ford quipped, referring to the forlorn 0-6 record of the Detroit professional football team his family owns. So began William Clay Ford Jr.'
BUSINESS
October 30, 2001 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ford Motor Co. Chief Executive Jacques Nasser--who has suffered more than a year of humiliation and criticism with the Firestone tire crisis, shrinking profit and market share and quality problems that have plagued his company's vehicles--has been fired and will be replaced by Chairman William Clay Ford Jr., a source familiar with the company's plan said late Monday.
BUSINESS
July 27, 2001 | TERRIL YUE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of bad news and billions of dollars spent on the Firestone tire crisis, Ford Motor Co. realigned the relationship of its two top executives Thursday to put more power in the hands of family scion William Clay Ford Jr. The move confirms longtime rumors of a management shift that would more deeply involve the 44-year-old chairman, a great-grandson of company founder Henry Ford, in corporate decisions that have been dominated by 53-year-old President and Chief Executive Jacques Nasser.
BUSINESS
June 6, 2001 | DORON LEVIN, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Ford Motor Co. Chief Executive Jacques Nasser said the auto maker's directors are "extremely supportive" of him and rejected reports that the company may reshuffle top managers because of a tire safety probe or Ford's slipping performance in a quality survey. The CEO's performance has been watched closely since Bridgestone/Firestone Inc. recalled 6.5 million tires in August after reports of fatal accidents, many involving the Ford Explorer, the best-selling sport-utility vehicle.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2001 | From Reuters
Ford Motor Co. disclosed Tuesday that Chief Executive and President Jacques Nasser earned $12.1 million last year as he grappled with the crisis that erupted over deaths and injuries in rollovers of the popular Explorer sport-utility vehicle. The figure, which included salary, bonus and other compensation, marked a nearly 19% increase in compensation for Nasser compared with 1999, when he earned $10.2 million in his first year as president and CEO of the world's No. 2 auto maker.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2000
Ford Chief Executive Jacques Nasser would like to reassure us that nothing is more important to Ford than the public's safety, while laying the blame for so many Ford Explorer accidents squarely at the feet of the defective manufacture of Firestone's tires ["More Deaths Are Linked to Faulty Tires," Sept. 1]. The Times has performed a most useful service in making public the controversy that occurred at Ford 11 years ago, when engineers knew without a doubt that the about-to-be-introduced Ford Explorer was dangerously prone to rollovers when the vehicles' tires were inflated to Firestone's recommended pressures.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since 1980, a Ford will soon be heading Ford Motor Co. William Clay Ford Jr., 41, the great-grandson of company founder Henry Ford, will become chairman Jan. 1. He will succeed Alex Trotman, 65, who is retiring as Ford's chairman, president and chief executive. Jacques Nasser, 50, now head of Ford's global auto operations, will become president and chief executive. He will oversee day-to-day operations of the world's second-largest auto maker.
BUSINESS
September 12, 1998 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the first time since 1980, a Ford will soon be heading Ford Motor Co. William Clay Ford Jr., 41, the great-grandson of company founder Henry Ford, will become chairman Jan. 1. He will succeed Alex Trotman, 65, who is retiring as Ford's chairman, president and chief executive. Jacques Nasser, 50, now head of Ford's global auto operations, will become president and chief executive. He will oversee day-to-day operations of the world's second-largest auto maker.
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