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Jacques Parizeau

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OPINION
December 11, 1994 | Craig Turner, Craig Turner is The Times' Canada correspondent
To his admirers, Jacques Parizeau is the avuncular, albeit formal, ex-college professor and economist, focused with brilliant intensity on a nearly 30-year-old dream of making his native province of Quebec a new nation, independent from the rest of Canada. To detractors, he is an arrogant fantasist, dwelling on archaic rivalries between English- and French-speaking Canadians and bent on breaking up a country that a recent U.N. study ranked the world's most livable.
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NEWS
May 9, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Former separatist Premier Jacques Parizeau, weighing in on an election campaign set ablaze by a report that he had planned to unilaterally declare Quebec independent in 1995, denied that this had been his intention. The newspaper Le Soleil said excerpts from his memoirs showed that as Quebec premier he had planned to help the province secede.
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NEWS
May 9, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Former separatist Premier Jacques Parizeau, weighing in on an election campaign set ablaze by a report that he had planned to unilaterally declare Quebec independent in 1995, denied that this had been his intention. The newspaper Le Soleil said excerpts from his memoirs showed that as Quebec premier he had planned to help the province secede.
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the way it played on the evening news here, one might assume the fate of Canada rests with a 36-year-old American from Orange County who now lives in Montreal. At least, that was how anchorman Peter Mansbridge, tongue slightly in cheek, framed the story naming Audrey Best as the Canadian Broadcasting Corp.'s "newsmaker of the week" last Friday. Best is married to Lucien Bouchard, 56, the politician who led Quebec separatists tantalizingly close to their goal of independence from Canada in the province's Oct. 30 referendum.
NEWS
November 10, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the way it played on the evening news here, one might assume the fate of Canada rests with a 36-year-old American from Orange County who now lives in Montreal. At least, that was how anchorman Peter Mansbridge, tongue slightly in cheek, framed the story naming Audrey Best as the Canadian Broadcasting Corp.'s "newsmaker of the week" last Friday. Best is married to Lucien Bouchard, 56, the politician who led Quebec separatists tantalizingly close to their goal of independence from Canada in the province's Oct. 30 referendum.
NEWS
November 1, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jacques Parizeau, the separatist premier of Quebec, announced his resignation Tuesday, less than 24 hours after his forces fell just short of winning the right to take the French- speaking province out of Canada. Parizeau, 65, denied that his decision was influenced by the avalanche of criticism that struck him for a speech he made after the ballots were counted, in which he blamed "money and the ethnic vote" for thwarting the nationalist ambitions of French-descended Quebeckers.
NEWS
July 2, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Queen Elizabeth II plunged deep into Canada's troubled political waters Sunday as she helped Canadians celebrate their national holiday with visits to both the English- and French-speaking sides of this bilingual capital city. "I am not just a fair-weather friend, and I am glad to be here at this sensitive time," the queen told a crowd of about 70,000 well-wishers on the lawns of the Canadian Parliament building.
NEWS
January 11, 1994
Daniel Johnson, a fiscal conservative and a federalist, is to be sworn in as premier of Quebec today amid continuing speculation over his abilities to outmaneuver the province's perennial French-speaking separatist movement as successfully as his predecessor. Johnson succeeds longstanding Premier Robert Bourassa, a Liberal who was known for his canny handling of the situation but who stepped down last year because of ill health.
NEWS
June 22, 1985 | Associated Press
The campaign to succeed Quebec Premier Rene Levesque opened Friday, sparking a contest that could determine whether the Parti Quebecois returns to the hard-line separatism Levesque eventually rejected. The premier, whose vision of taking Quebec out of Canada to become an independent French-speaking nation fell short in a decisive referendum in May, 1980, submitted his resignation as party chief just before midnight Thursday.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1995 | From Reuters
At the end of a week in which he narrowly lost the Quebec referendum on sovereignty and announced his own eventual resignation, Quebec Premier Jacques Parizeau demoted his Finance Minister. In a Cabinet shuffle Friday, Parizeau moved Jean Campeau from the finance portfolio to transport, a significantly less prestigious post. Quebec separatists were defeated 50.6% to 49.4% in Monday's referendum on Quebec sovereignty.
NEWS
November 1, 1995 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jacques Parizeau, the separatist premier of Quebec, announced his resignation Tuesday, less than 24 hours after his forces fell just short of winning the right to take the French- speaking province out of Canada. Parizeau, 65, denied that his decision was influenced by the avalanche of criticism that struck him for a speech he made after the ballots were counted, in which he blamed "money and the ethnic vote" for thwarting the nationalist ambitions of French-descended Quebeckers.
OPINION
December 11, 1994 | Craig Turner, Craig Turner is The Times' Canada correspondent
To his admirers, Jacques Parizeau is the avuncular, albeit formal, ex-college professor and economist, focused with brilliant intensity on a nearly 30-year-old dream of making his native province of Quebec a new nation, independent from the rest of Canada. To detractors, he is an arrogant fantasist, dwelling on archaic rivalries between English- and French-speaking Canadians and bent on breaking up a country that a recent U.N. study ranked the world's most livable.
NEWS
July 2, 1990 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Queen Elizabeth II plunged deep into Canada's troubled political waters Sunday as she helped Canadians celebrate their national holiday with visits to both the English- and French-speaking sides of this bilingual capital city. "I am not just a fair-weather friend, and I am glad to be here at this sensitive time," the queen told a crowd of about 70,000 well-wishers on the lawns of the Canadian Parliament building.
NEWS
August 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
A protester pushed a paper plate full of whipped cream into the face of Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien on Wednesday. Chretien, 66, had just arrived at a convention center in Charlottetown and was greeting supporters when the man walked up and shoved the plate of whipped cream in his face. The prime minister bowed his head and removed the plate, his face covered in cream. Looking angry, Chretien was led to a washroom to clean up.
NEWS
November 19, 1994 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Quebec government suspended plans Friday for a controversial dam on the Great Whale River in northern Quebec, a project that has been the focus of international environmental protests led by the Cree Indians who live along the river. Addressing a conference here of the American Council for Quebec Studies, a U.S. academic group, provincial Tourism Minister Rita Dionne-Marsolais said the Great Whale project is "no longer a priority" for the Quebec government.
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