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Jacques Rogge

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February 13, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge, under fire after the IOC's decision to drop wrestling from the Olympics on Tuesday, says he will meet with the head of wrestling's governing body to discuss ways the sport can fight to return to the Games. Rogge says he has talked to Raphael Martinetti, the president of international wrestling federation FILA, and they agreed they "would meet at the first opportunity to have discussions.” Rogge says he was encouraged FILA had “vowed to adapt the sport and vowed to fight" the decision.
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February 13, 2013 | By Houston Mitchell
International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge, under fire after the IOC's decision to drop wrestling from the Olympics on Tuesday, says he will meet with the head of wrestling's governing body to discuss ways the sport can fight to return to the Games. Rogge says he has talked to Raphael Martinetti, the president of international wrestling federation FILA, and they agreed they "would meet at the first opportunity to have discussions.” Rogge says he was encouraged FILA had “vowed to adapt the sport and vowed to fight" the decision.
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SPORTS
August 24, 2008 | Randy Harvey
When it's 8 a.m. in Los Angeles . . . . . . it is 11 p.m. in Beijing -- VIEWERS GUIDE TIMING: Beijing is 15 hours ahead of Los Angeles. That means as you grab your morning paper at 8 a.m. today, it's already 11 p.m. in Beijing. Much of the action takes place from about 6 p.m. to 9 a.m. Pacific time. The Times' daily special section Beijing 2008 has all the information from events that conclude by about 10 p.m. Los Angeles time. CATCHING UP: For up-to-the-moment news with your morning cup of French roast, go to latimes.
SPORTS
July 25, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
LONDON — They're not asking for much, these two elderly women who lost their husbands to the worst crime in Olympic history. They're not asking for a speech or a video or even a prayer to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the murder of 11 Israelis at the 1972 Munich Games. They're asking for a single minute. One minute. One breath of silence at these London Games' opening ceremony. One brief remembrance of the lives that were lost on a day when terror triumphed over sport. One short but jarring condemnation of that terror.
SPORTS
February 26, 2010 | Staff And Wire Reports
IOC President Jacques Rogge says the death of a Georgian luger will forever be associated with the Vancouver Games, just as the slaying of Israeli athletes remains a legacy of the Munich Olympics. Rogge says the International Olympic Committee accepts "moral responsibility" but not legal responsibility for the death of Nodar Kumaritashvili . The IOC chief says the training crash death will always cast a shadow over the Vancouver Olympics, but should be taken separately from the overall success of the Games.
SPORTS
July 17, 2001 | RANDY HARVEY
The International Olympic Committee calls its special sessions extraordinary. So, technically, the 112th session that ended Monday did not qualify for such distinction. Trust me, though, this session was extraordinary almost to the end.
SPORTS
August 3, 2002 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge, proclaiming himself appalled that a reputed Russian mobster allegedly conspired to fix the pairs and ice dance competitions at the Salt Lake City Games, left an opening for the ice dance results to be recalculated if U.S. and Italian authorities uncover evidence that warrants dramatic remedies. "I will rule out nothing," Rogge said Friday from Manchester, England, where he was attending the Commonwealth Games. "Everything is possible.
SPORTS
August 8, 2001 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Proclaiming repeatedly that the worst corruption scandal in Olympic history is over, Jacques Rogge, the recently elected president of the International Olympic Committee, said Tuesday that he has every confidence the Salt Lake Winter Olympics will be "excellent Games." Today marks the six-month countdown to the Games, which begin Feb. 8.
SPORTS
December 9, 2001 | From Associated Press
During his first five months in office, Jacques Rogge has barely paused to catch his breath. He's been circling the globe, visiting world capitals from Washington to Beijing and meeting with presidents and prime ministers. With the Olympic flame on its way to Salt Lake City, Rogge is getting ready for his first games as president of the International Olympic Committee. Little has surprised the former orthopedic surgeon as he adjusts to his role as the most powerful man in international sport.
SPORTS
August 10, 2004 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Jacques Rogge, president of the International Olympic Committee, said Monday that organizers of the 2004 Games have "complete confidence" in Greece's security plan for the Athens Olympics, a $1.5-billion effort that includes 70,000 security personnel and NATO air and sea patrols. "These efforts are justified as, going beyond the Games, what is at stake is protecting society, democracy, civilization and freedom," Rogge told IOC delegates.
SPORTS
June 22, 2010 | By Grahame L. Jones and Kevin Baxter
Reporting from Johannesburg, South Africa — South Africa hopes that by staging a successful World Cup it will become a viable candidate to host the Olympic Games, perhaps as soon as in 2020. "We have got the facilities. Those who take decisions have seen how South Africa is. I'm sure we can do it," Jacob Zuma , the country's president, told Reuters on Tuesday. "It is now known Africa is capable of hosting any serious tournament." Cape Town bid for the 2004 Games that were awarded to Athens.
SPORTS
February 26, 2010 | Staff And Wire Reports
IOC President Jacques Rogge says the death of a Georgian luger will forever be associated with the Vancouver Games, just as the slaying of Israeli athletes remains a legacy of the Munich Olympics. Rogge says the International Olympic Committee accepts "moral responsibility" but not legal responsibility for the death of Nodar Kumaritashvili . The IOC chief says the training crash death will always cast a shadow over the Vancouver Olympics, but should be taken separately from the overall success of the Games.
SPORTS
February 13, 2010 | Bill Plaschke
There was skidding, sailing, a man flying off the edge of an icy track, his body crumpling on a metal walkway, a lifeless leg dangling in the air. There was a glittering floating grizzly, a snowboarder flying under giant glowing rings, beaming athletes marching under giant wool hats. Death came to the Olympics. Life came to the Olympics . It all happened on the same day Friday, the quadrennial winter celebration sliding out of the starting gate in staggering, breathless uncertainty.
SPORTS
February 12, 2010 | By Candus Thomson
Just hours before the caldron was lighted to mark the start of these Winter Olympics, a young athlete's life was snuffed out in a horrific crash on the world's fastest luge track. On a morning training run under the first blue sky in days, Nodar Kumaritashvili, 21, of the Republic of Georgia lost control of his sled at about 80 mph as he came out of the final curve -- nicknamed Thunderbird -- and approached the finish line. He catapulted over the outer lip of the track and slammed into an unpadded roof support post.
SPORTS
August 25, 2008 | BILL PLASCHKE
Beijing And for their final surprise, the Chinese laughed. Formally ending an Olympics that was as much mystery as majesty, the host nation unfolded its arms, threw back its head, and howled. There were silly flying drummers, a human tambourine composed of thousands of shimmying women, and chugging unicyclists rolling giant glowing circles. There were guns shooting confetti into the stands, gymnasts bouncing on stilts, and Power Ranger look-alikes soaring up and down on ropes just for the heck of it. In the closing ceremony Sunday, after two weeks of an Olympics that was run as sternly as the thousands of soldiers who guarded it, the Chinese finally let that guard down.
SPORTS
August 24, 2008 | Randy Harvey
When it's 8 a.m. in Los Angeles . . . . . . it is 11 p.m. in Beijing -- VIEWERS GUIDE TIMING: Beijing is 15 hours ahead of Los Angeles. That means as you grab your morning paper at 8 a.m. today, it's already 11 p.m. in Beijing. Much of the action takes place from about 6 p.m. to 9 a.m. Pacific time. The Times' daily special section Beijing 2008 has all the information from events that conclude by about 10 p.m. Los Angeles time. CATCHING UP: For up-to-the-moment news with your morning cup of French roast, go to latimes.
SPORTS
July 21, 2001 | DIANE PUCIN
Most of the back-patting by the International Olympic Committee should have stopped by now. Hooray for them. The IOC has elected a new president. His name is Jacques Rogge. He is from Belgium. He is a doctor. He was an Olympic yachtsman. He has not, that anyone knows, committed a crime, offered bribes, taken bribes. He is, of course, white and male and European. He is practically a saint. And he had some interesting words for the United States.
SPORTS
May 28, 2002 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Progress in preparations for the 2004 Athens Olympics is "heartening," plans for the 2006 Winter Games in Turin, Italy, are "quiet and normal," and the 2008 Beijing Olympics offer the "prospect of a superb Games," International Olympic Committee President Jacques Rogge said Monday. In what amounted to a presidential sketch of the state of the Olympic movement, Rogge, speaking at the end of a week of meetings with the IOC executive board and the 199-member Assn.
SPORTS
August 23, 2008 | Kevin Baxter, Times Staff Writer
BEIJING -- This was not the way the United States wanted to bow out of Olympic baseball: playing for the bronze medal at 10:30 in the morning under a blazing sun. "Ten o'clock feels more like a spring training game," U.S. Manager Davey Johnson said. Minor leaguers are used to playing spring training games, though. So it was no surprise when three of them -- Jason Donald, Matt LaPorta and Matt Brown -- homered, leading the U.S. to an 8-4 rout of Japan and a third-place finish in what, for now at least, is being billed as baseball's last appearance in the Olympics.
SPORTS
July 10, 2005 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
The president of the International Olympic Committee, Jacques Rogge, an orthopedic surgeon from Belgium, is far more willing than his predecessor, Juan Antonio Samaranch of Spain, to oversee an IOC session peppered by dissent and round upon round of perplexing votes.
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