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Jacques Soustelle

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August 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jacques Soustelle, one of the first to rally to Gen. Charles de Gaulle's call for a resistance movement during World War II, but who later broke with the French president over Algeria, died Tuesday. The former cabinet minister, world-renowned ethnologist and wartime head of the Free French secret services was 78. He died in Neuilly-sur-Seine, a spokesman for the Academie Francaise announced.
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NEWS
August 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jacques Soustelle, one of the first to rally to Gen. Charles de Gaulle's call for a resistance movement during World War II, but who later broke with the French president over Algeria, died Tuesday. The former cabinet minister, world-renowned ethnologist and wartime head of the Free French secret services was 78. He died in Neuilly-sur-Seine, a spokesman for the Academie Francaise announced.
OPINION
September 30, 2001 | CHALMERS JOHNSON, Chalmers Johnson is author of "Revolutionary Change" and "Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire."
One of the objectives of terrorism is to provoke the ruling elites of a target regime into disastrous overreaction. When it works, as it has in Israel over the past year, the results can be devastating for all sides. Who does this ultimately benefit? The terrorists. Carlos Marighella, the Brazilian guerrilla leader whose writings influenced political terrorists in the 1960s and 1970s, explained why.
OPINION
June 23, 1996 | Victor Perera, Victor Perera, who teaches at UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism, is the author of "The Cross and the Pear Tree: A Sephardic Journey" (Knopf), and co-author, with Robert D. Bruce, of "The Last Lords of Palenque" (U.C. Press
In the last four years, one calamity after another has befallen the Maya elder Chan K'in in his Lacandon forest home. In December 1994, a close friend, the Swiss explorer and photographer Gertrude Duby Blom, died. A week later, the Zapatista Army of National Liberation declared war on the Mexican government, and its followers threatened to seize the Lacandon community's lands. The 500 surviving Lacandon Mayas are the last unbroken link to a 3,500-year-old Olmec-Maya tradition.
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