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Jacques Tati

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December 26, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Nearly three decades after his death, French comic actor Jacques Tati has returned to the silver screen ? starring in a movie he wrote that was never produced. If this sounds like sleight-of-hand, it is, in a way: The film is aptly titled "The Illusionist," and it has been brought to life by the imagination and sensitivity of French animator Sylvain Chomet, who is best known for 2003's "The Triplets of Belleville. " The hand-drawn, 2-D "Illusionist" opened Saturday and may give Pixar's "Toy Story 3" a run for its money this awards season.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Love him or hate him — or love him and hate him — it is hard to deny the colossus that is Jerry Lewis, International Clown. Even if you only know him from his echoes — Professor Frink on "The Simpsons," Adam Sandler movies, the Beastie Boys — you are living in a world that he has partly made. Among American film comedians, he's one of a small number who rate the term "auteur"; at the same time, he's kids' stuff, a thing we know from childhood and treasure like other childhood things.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2001 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is a scene in "Mon Oncle," a 1958 comedy directed by French filmmaker Jacques Tati, where Monsieur Hulot, a Buster Keaton-like character played by Tati himself, visits his nephew at the futuristic home of his unbearably bourgeois brother-in-law. The family lives surrounded by all the numbing comforts that money can buy, including a grotesque fountain with a gurgling fish spitting out water.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2011 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Justin Bieber: Never Say Never Paramount, $29.99; Blu-ray, $39.99 Those with chronic cases of Bieber Fever should be well-satisfied by the young pop star's concert film. Intercutting slick live performances with old home movies and new footage of Bieber on tour, "Never Say Never" effectively communicates how the teen idol became a phenomenon, along with showing what it's like to be a mere kid at the center of a multimillion-dollar business. As for the actual music, well, fans will like the energetic stage show, and even skeptics might be impressed by how hard Bieber works.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Nuart is presenting the same four Jacques Tati films that were shown two years ago at the Monica 4-Plex--but with a difference: "Jour de Fete" (1949), which will screen Friday through Wednesday, will boast a newly restored color print. "Mr. Hulot's Holiday" (1953) screens Saturday and Sunday at noon, and "Playtime" (1968) and "Mon Oncle" (1958) screen as a double feature next Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1988 | Kevin Thomas, Compiled by Terry Atkinson
*** "The Family Game" Sony/Japan Society. $59.95. 1984. Yoshimitsu Morita's film is perhaps the first contemporary Japanese picture to spoof middle-class family life so outrageously (yet subtly). It becomes increasingly like a Jacques Tati comedy in its sense of growing absurdity and builds toward a climax of pure anarchy. Uproarious, provocative, unique.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2010
ART Photography From the New China The new Getty exhibition, which showcases recently acquired photos from Hai Bo, Liu Zheng, Song Yongping and others, underscores the contrast between the types of photography emerging from China before and after Deng Xiaoping declared the beginning of a new era of opening and reform. Getty Center , 1200 Getty Center Drive, L.A. Through April 24. Free. http://www.getty.edu MOVIES The Illusionist Cinefamily hosts an exclusive sneak preview of Sylvain Chomet's ("The Triplets of Belleville")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1991 | RANDY LEWIS
In a recent story about Steve Martin's new movie, "L.A. Story," film critic Roger Ebert said Martin "is like those screen comedians of the past--Buster Keaton and Jacques Tati--who did not depend on violence, embarrassment and the put-down for their laughs, and instead just simply put genuinely funny things on the screen." Keaton is familiar to most of us, if only by name and that unforgettable stone face.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2011 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Love him or hate him — or love him and hate him — it is hard to deny the colossus that is Jerry Lewis, International Clown. Even if you only know him from his echoes — Professor Frink on "The Simpsons," Adam Sandler movies, the Beastie Boys — you are living in a world that he has partly made. Among American film comedians, he's one of a small number who rate the term "auteur"; at the same time, he's kids' stuff, a thing we know from childhood and treasure like other childhood things.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Nearly three decades after his death, French comic actor Jacques Tati has returned to the silver screen ? starring in a movie he wrote that was never produced. If this sounds like sleight-of-hand, it is, in a way: The film is aptly titled "The Illusionist," and it has been brought to life by the imagination and sensitivity of French animator Sylvain Chomet, who is best known for 2003's "The Triplets of Belleville. " The hand-drawn, 2-D "Illusionist" opened Saturday and may give Pixar's "Toy Story 3" a run for its money this awards season.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Bittersweet and melancholy are not the words usually associated with animation, but they are the ones that best fit "The Illusionist," the new feature by French director Sylvain Chomet. As those who know and love his last film, the sprightly "The Triplets of Belleville," understand, Chomet is a completely idiosyncratic filmmaker, someone whose eccentric animation does not resemble anyone else's. In "The Illusionist," Chomet has teamed with another singular talent, the late French comic master Jacques Tati.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 2010
ART Photography From the New China The new Getty exhibition, which showcases recently acquired photos from Hai Bo, Liu Zheng, Song Yongping and others, underscores the contrast between the types of photography emerging from China before and after Deng Xiaoping declared the beginning of a new era of opening and reform. Getty Center , 1200 Getty Center Drive, L.A. Through April 24. Free. http://www.getty.edu MOVIES The Illusionist Cinefamily hosts an exclusive sneak preview of Sylvain Chomet's ("The Triplets of Belleville")
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2010 | By Susan King
France's beloved filmmaker Jacques Tati is being feted this weekend at the American Cinematheque's Aero Theatre. The tall, lanky actor-writer-director created a series of slapstick delights that relied more on sight gags than dialogue. His cinematic alter ego, the endearingly bumbling Mr. Hulot, is one of the greatest comedy creations. The fun starts Thursday with a 70-millimeter print of his 1967 " Playtime," in which Hulot is in Paris trying to contact a U.S. official. On tap for Friday is 1958's charming "Mon Oncle," which won the Oscar for best foreign-language film and marked his first film in color.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2009 | By Susan King
It's a jolly holiday with Hulot. Beginning Friday, the Nuart Theatre is hosting a one-week engagement of a new 35-millimeter restoration of Jacques Tati's beloved 1953 French comedy "M. Hulot's Holiday." The farce marked Tati's introduction of his reel-life alter ego, Monsieur Hulot -- a rain-coated, hat-wearing pipe-smoker who seems to cause comedic mischief wherever he goes. In this outing, he heads to the beach, but his dream vacation turns out to be a nightmare for the resort town.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2001 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is a scene in "Mon Oncle," a 1958 comedy directed by French filmmaker Jacques Tati, where Monsieur Hulot, a Buster Keaton-like character played by Tati himself, visits his nephew at the futuristic home of his unbearably bourgeois brother-in-law. The family lives surrounded by all the numbing comforts that money can buy, including a grotesque fountain with a gurgling fish spitting out water.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2011 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Justin Bieber: Never Say Never Paramount, $29.99; Blu-ray, $39.99 Those with chronic cases of Bieber Fever should be well-satisfied by the young pop star's concert film. Intercutting slick live performances with old home movies and new footage of Bieber on tour, "Never Say Never" effectively communicates how the teen idol became a phenomenon, along with showing what it's like to be a mere kid at the center of a multimillion-dollar business. As for the actual music, well, fans will like the energetic stage show, and even skeptics might be impressed by how hard Bieber works.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Bittersweet and melancholy are not the words usually associated with animation, but they are the ones that best fit "The Illusionist," the new feature by French director Sylvain Chomet. As those who know and love his last film, the sprightly "The Triplets of Belleville," understand, Chomet is a completely idiosyncratic filmmaker, someone whose eccentric animation does not resemble anyone else's. In "The Illusionist," Chomet has teamed with another singular talent, the late French comic master Jacques Tati.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1998 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Nuart is presenting the same four Jacques Tati films that were shown two years ago at the Monica 4-Plex--but with a difference: "Jour de Fete" (1949), which will screen Friday through Wednesday, will boast a newly restored color print. "Mr. Hulot's Holiday" (1953) screens Saturday and Sunday at noon, and "Playtime" (1968) and "Mon Oncle" (1958) screen as a double feature next Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Monica 4-Plex is following up its splendid Sacha Guitry mini-retrospective with four films of Jacques Tati, another giant of the French cinema whose work is also revived infrequently. "Jour de Fete" (1949), "Mr. Hulot's Holiday" (1953), "Mon Oncle" (1958) and "Playtime" (1968) will screen simultaneously Saturdays and Sundays at 11 a.m. for the next three weekends.
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