Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJacques Verges
IN THE NEWS

Jacques Verges

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
March 28, 2004 | From Reuters
A French lawyer who defended Nazi Gestapo chief Klaus Barbie and Venezuelan terrorist Carlos the Jackal said Saturday that Saddam Hussein's nephew had chosen him to represent the deposed Iraqi president. Jacques Verges said he had received a letter from Ali Barzan Tikriti -- whose father, Barzan Tikriti, is Hussein's half-brother -- asking him to defend the former Iraqi dictator, captured by U.S. forces in December. Verges said he would accept. The U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Jacques Verges is such a compelling, complex and contradictory character that if he didn't exist someone would be obliged to invent him. It is the gift of "Terror's Advocate," Barbet Schroeder's riveting new documentary, to simply present Verges as is, to say "here is the man" and let things speak for themselves. Do they ever.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | Associated Press
Carlos the Jackal bantered with an anti-terrorism judge who charged him in a bombing case Tuesday, while his lawyer alleged he was betrayed, drugged and bound in a kidnap operation that ended his two decades on the lam. Carlos, born Ilich Ramirez Sanchez, was handed over to France on Monday by Sudan, his last refuge in a chaotic life on the run.
WORLD
March 28, 2004 | From Reuters
A French lawyer who defended Nazi Gestapo chief Klaus Barbie and Venezuelan terrorist Carlos the Jackal said Saturday that Saddam Hussein's nephew had chosen him to represent the deposed Iraqi president. Jacques Verges said he had received a letter from Ali Barzan Tikriti -- whose father, Barzan Tikriti, is Hussein's half-brother -- asking him to defend the former Iraqi dictator, captured by U.S. forces in December. Verges said he would accept. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1987
From the very beginning, the foundation of lawyer Jacques Verges' defense of Klaus Barbie at the war crimes trial in France was the distorted concept of justice that the human race's inability and failure to punish each and every wrongdoer should be the ground for Barbie's acquittal. Simply put, Verges wants us to accept the notion that if we cannot punish all wrongdoers, we cannot punish any wrongdoer. Verges' fallacious reasoning is self-evident from his statement, "Why should there be a trial of France and only France?"
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
In an unexpected outburst, Klaus Barbie, the former Nazi Gestapo lieutenant, arose in court Tuesday to charge his accusers with exaggerating his role in World War II and painting him falsely as "the master of Lyon." Barbie, 73, on the second day of his trial for "crimes against humanity," described himself as only one person in the 120-member Gestapo unit on duty in the Lyon region and not as the officer responsible for everything that went on.
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | STAN MEISLER
In the face of angry accusations of cowardice, Klaus Barbie, the former Gestapo chief in Lyon, refused Wednesday to attend any more sessions of his trial for "crimes against humanity." Barbie's withdrawal, permissible under French law, drained the trial of much of its drama, ensuring that Barbie will not have to face his alleged victims and their families during the weeks ahead.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Jacques Verges is such a compelling, complex and contradictory character that if he didn't exist someone would be obliged to invent him. It is the gift of "Terror's Advocate," Barbet Schroeder's riveting new documentary, to simply present Verges as is, to say "here is the man" and let things speak for themselves. Do they ever.
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once every few weeks, Carlos the Jackal is brought from prison to the office of France's top terrorist investigator for questioning. And it's always a game. Carlos chatters aimlessly, tries to make his interrogator laugh, asks impertinent questions and answers none himself. But the most controversial--some say most dangerous--man in the room isn't the notorious international terrorist but rather his lawyer, Jacques Verges.
NEWS
November 26, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A Justice Ministry official today denounced as a "horrible publicity stunt" a contention from a lawyer for Klaus Barbie that the convicted Gestapo war criminal known as the "Butcher of Lyon" should be released from prison because he has cancer. Assistant Justice Minister Georges Kiejman added that he did not believe an early release should be considered despite defense lawyer Jacques Verges' disclosure that Barbie has blood cancer. "Medical pardons are very sparingly distributed," Kiejman said.
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once every few weeks, Carlos the Jackal is brought from prison to the office of France's top terrorist investigator for questioning. And it's always a game. Carlos chatters aimlessly, tries to make his interrogator laugh, asks impertinent questions and answers none himself. But the most controversial--some say most dangerous--man in the room isn't the notorious international terrorist but rather his lawyer, Jacques Verges.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | Associated Press
Carlos the Jackal bantered with an anti-terrorism judge who charged him in a bombing case Tuesday, while his lawyer alleged he was betrayed, drugged and bound in a kidnap operation that ended his two decades on the lam. Carlos, born Ilich Ramirez Sanchez, was handed over to France on Monday by Sudan, his last refuge in a chaotic life on the run.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1987
From the very beginning, the foundation of lawyer Jacques Verges' defense of Klaus Barbie at the war crimes trial in France was the distorted concept of justice that the human race's inability and failure to punish each and every wrongdoer should be the ground for Barbie's acquittal. Simply put, Verges wants us to accept the notion that if we cannot punish all wrongdoers, we cannot punish any wrongdoer. Verges' fallacious reasoning is self-evident from his statement, "Why should there be a trial of France and only France?"
NEWS
May 14, 1987 | STAN MEISLER
In the face of angry accusations of cowardice, Klaus Barbie, the former Gestapo chief in Lyon, refused Wednesday to attend any more sessions of his trial for "crimes against humanity." Barbie's withdrawal, permissible under French law, drained the trial of much of its drama, ensuring that Barbie will not have to face his alleged victims and their families during the weeks ahead.
NEWS
May 13, 1987 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
In an unexpected outburst, Klaus Barbie, the former Nazi Gestapo lieutenant, arose in court Tuesday to charge his accusers with exaggerating his role in World War II and painting him falsely as "the master of Lyon." Barbie, 73, on the second day of his trial for "crimes against humanity," described himself as only one person in the 120-member Gestapo unit on duty in the Lyon region and not as the officer responsible for everything that went on.
NEWS
February 23, 1987 | From Reuters
Suspected Lebanese guerrilla leader Georges Ibrahim Abdallah today withdrew from his trial on charges of political violence, denouncing what he called a political tribunal run by France and the United States. The 35-year-old Lebanese Christian militant left the courtroom after reading a long statement attacking "blond Westerners with blue eyes" and defending the action of "Arab fighters." "Down with Yankee imperialism and its lackeys!"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2007 | Kenneth Turan
Even if you feel sick and tired of documentaries, the unexpectedly fascinating "Terror's Advocate" will make you sit up and take notice. Made by the savvy, fearless Barbet Schroeder, it's as smart and unexpected as its subject, French attorney Jacques Verges, unknown here but familiar in Europe for defending indefensible individuals like notorious terrorist Carlos the Jackal and for alleged ties to Cambodian genocide architect Pol Pot.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|