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Jacques Yves Cousteau

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NEWS
November 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
French ocean explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau, who is campaigning for international action to protect the environment, said that human destruction of the planet can only be halted through the adoption of internationally mandated environmental laws. "I am proud of a human species that overcame nature, provided we don't spoil it by tremendous mistakes," Cousteau, 82, told an audience at the Commonwealth Club of California.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1997 | STEVEN LINAN
MUSIC Jammin' at Jamizon: The first Jamizon, an ambitious urban music concert tour put together by Magic Johnson and Quincy Jones' Vibe magazine, will kick off July 23 in Jacksonville, Fla., and feature performances by Keith Sweat, SWV, Kenny Lattimore, Brownstone and Mark Morrison. The 26-city U.S. tour, which will include an Aug.
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NEWS
June 6, 1992 | From Associated Press
The explosive growth in population, which is expected to triple to 16 billion in 80 years, is leading to a world where people will be "surviving like rats," undersea explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau said Friday. "Even if we found a way to feed this human tidal wave, it would be impossible to provide this multitude with decent living conditions," Cousteau said in a speech. "Surviving like rats is not what we should bequeath to our children and grandchildren."
NEWS
June 26, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Jacques-Yves Cousteau, the ageless old man of the seas who invented ways for men and women to live beneath the water and then took the rest of the human race there vicariously via his spectacular films and television documentaries, died Wednesday in Paris. The French-born oceanographer had been ill for months. Cousteau's wife, Francine, said he died at home before dawn after suffering a respiratory infection and heart problems.
NEWS
June 26, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
Jacques-Yves Cousteau, the ageless old man of the seas who invented ways for men and women to live beneath the water and then took the rest of the human race there vicariously via his spectacular films and television documentaries, died Wednesday in Paris. The French-born oceanographer had been ill for months. Cousteau's wife, Francine, said he died at home before dawn after suffering a respiratory infection and heart problems.
NEWS
November 5, 1995 | JON MATSUMOTO, Jon Matsumoto is a frequent contributor to TV Times and Calendar
"When I was a child my mother read me a book which was about curiosity," Jacques-Yves Cousteau recalls. "That type of curiosity has inspired my whole life." Just where Cousteau's curiosity has led him--and what that journey has opened our eyes and minds to--is the subject of "Jacques-Yves Cousteau: My First 85 Years." His two-hour film autobiography premieres Sunday on TBS.
NEWS
March 6, 1989
Explorer-inventor Jacques-Yves Cousteau will receive the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation's 1989 Distinguished Peace Leadership Award at the foundation's annual dinner April 22 at the Red Lion Resort Inn in Santa Barbara. Ticket information and reservations: Nuclear Age Peace Foundation, 1187 Coast Village Road, Suite 123, Santa Barbara 93108 (805) 965-3443.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Simone Cousteau, an accomplished underwater diver who accompanied her husband, Jacques Yves Cousteau, on hundreds of voyages aboard the marine research ship Calypso, has died at her home in Monaco. The Cousteau Foundation said Monday that she was 72 when she died Sunday of undisclosed causes.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1997 | STEVEN LINAN
MUSIC Jammin' at Jamizon: The first Jamizon, an ambitious urban music concert tour put together by Magic Johnson and Quincy Jones' Vibe magazine, will kick off July 23 in Jacksonville, Fla., and feature performances by Keith Sweat, SWV, Kenny Lattimore, Brownstone and Mark Morrison. The 26-city U.S. tour, which will include an Aug.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | PHIL McCOMBS, The Washington Post
Jacques-Yves Cousteau, the ocean explorer and film maker, is preparing to dive on a reef off Papua New Guinea with his son Jean-Michel. In six decades at sea, he has made countless dives, but this time it's different. There's a quiet tension among the crew and cameramen on the fantail of Calypso. Cousteau is 78 years old, his ears have been damaged by repeated exposure to the depths, and though he remains chipper and vigorous, the creeping frailty of age is etched deeply in his wrinkles.
NEWS
November 5, 1995 | JON MATSUMOTO, Jon Matsumoto is a frequent contributor to TV Times and Calendar
"When I was a child my mother read me a book which was about curiosity," Jacques-Yves Cousteau recalls. "That type of curiosity has inspired my whole life." Just where Cousteau's curiosity has led him--and what that journey has opened our eyes and minds to--is the subject of "Jacques-Yves Cousteau: My First 85 Years." His two-hour film autobiography premieres Sunday on TBS.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | From Associated Press
The explosive growth in population, which is expected to triple to 16 billion in 80 years, is leading to a world where people will be "surviving like rats," undersea explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau said Friday. "Even if we found a way to feed this human tidal wave, it would be impossible to provide this multitude with decent living conditions," Cousteau said in a speech. "Surviving like rats is not what we should bequeath to our children and grandchildren."
NEWS
November 22, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
French ocean explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau, who is campaigning for international action to protect the environment, said that human destruction of the planet can only be halted through the adoption of internationally mandated environmental laws. "I am proud of a human species that overcame nature, provided we don't spoil it by tremendous mistakes," Cousteau, 82, told an audience at the Commonwealth Club of California.
NEWS
December 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Simone Cousteau, an accomplished underwater diver who accompanied her husband, Jacques Yves Cousteau, on hundreds of voyages aboard the marine research ship Calypso, has died at her home in Monaco. The Cousteau Foundation said Monday that she was 72 when she died Sunday of undisclosed causes.
NEWS
March 6, 1989
Explorer-inventor Jacques-Yves Cousteau will receive the Nuclear Age Peace Foundation's 1989 Distinguished Peace Leadership Award at the foundation's annual dinner April 22 at the Red Lion Resort Inn in Santa Barbara. Ticket information and reservations: Nuclear Age Peace Foundation, 1187 Coast Village Road, Suite 123, Santa Barbara 93108 (805) 965-3443.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | PHIL McCOMBS, The Washington Post
Jacques-Yves Cousteau, the ocean explorer and film maker, is preparing to dive on a reef off Papua New Guinea with his son Jean-Michel. In six decades at sea, he has made countless dives, but this time it's different. There's a quiet tension among the crew and cameramen on the fantail of Calypso. Cousteau is 78 years old, his ears have been damaged by repeated exposure to the depths, and though he remains chipper and vigorous, the creeping frailty of age is etched deeply in his wrinkles.
NEWS
October 12, 1990
Melvin M. Payne, 79, chairman emeritus of the National Geographic Society's board of trustees. Payne began working with the organization in 1932 as a secretary and later served as president and as chairman of the board. Under his leadership, the society backed Capt. Jacques Yves Cousteau's underwater explorations, the first American ascent of Mt. Everest and Jane Goodall's studies of wild chimpanzees. On Saturday in Washington of pneumonia.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Night of Awards: Emmy-winning explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau and his son, Jean-Michael Cousteau, will receive certificates of merit from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences tonight "for significant contributions to television and the world of scientific exploration," prior to telling academy members about their lives in an informal discussion with producer David L. Wolper. . . .
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