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Jafar Panahi

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
White may be making a comeback on the red carpet this award season, if Oscar-winning director Paul Haggis has anything to say about it. FOR THE RECORD: In an earlier version of this article, the age of British-Iranian actress and Amnesty International spokewoman Nazanin Boniadi was given as 39. She's 31. Haggis, the director of "Crash," and others are urging Hollywood stars to pin on white lapel ribbons to register their opposition to...
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2013 | By Susan Stone
BERLIN -- Forbidden from making films, Iranian director Jafar Panahi is struggling with the restriction, says his longtime collaborator. “It's difficult to work, but not being able to work is even more difficult, and especially at the height of your career,” said Kamboziya Partovi, who co-directed and starred in “Closed Curtain,” Panahi's new work that premiered Tuesday at the Berlinale. Panahi remains in Iran, prohibited from traveling or making movies, according to a sentence imposed on him in late 2010 for his involvement in election protests the previous year.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Restrained yet powerful, devastating in its emotional effects, "The Circle" is a landmark in Iranian cinema. By combining two things that are relatively rare in that country's production--unapologetically dramatic storytelling and an implicit challenge to the prevailing political ideology--this new film by producer-director Jafar Panahi creates a potent synthesis that was the surprise winner of the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
 On Tuesday night at the Berlin Film Festival, the Iranian director Jafar Panahi will debut his new movie “Closed Curtain.” Panahi himself won't be there to present it, of course; he remains under house arrest in Iran, and the premiere is scheduled to be anchored by Kamboziya Partovi, Panahi's actor and co-director. Since being sentenced to a 20-year filmmaking and publicity ban in late 2010, Panahi has been downright prolific. While many bans tend to have a paradoxically healthy effect on filmmaking, in Panahi's case it's been something of an IV injection.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Renowned Iranian director Jafar Panahi, best known for his Oscar-nominated film "The White Balloon," was detained last weekend for 12 hours by immigration officials at JFK Airport in New York, where he was changing planes en route from the Hong Kong to the Buenos Aires film festivals. He was then held four more hours before being put on a plane back to Hong Kong and from there on to Tehran, where he makes his home, according to a friend of the director.
WORLD
December 21, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
A celebrated Iranian filmmaker and opposition supporter has been sentenced to six years in prison and barred from making films or participating in political activity for two decades, his lawyer said Monday. Jafar Panahi, 50, is the director of internationally renowned Iranian art films such as "The Circle" and "Crimson Gold," which delved into Iran's complex social problems. He was a supporter of the protest movement that sprang to life after the disputed 2009 reelection of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
WORLD
March 3, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi
One of Iran's most acclaimed film directors has been detained amid an ongoing government crackdown against the opposition, an official said Tuesday. Jafar Panahi, an award-winning director of neorealist films exploring Iran's social topography, along with his wife, 20-year-old daughter and 15 guests were reportedly arrested at his home Monday night in murky circumstances under unspecified charges. Among the guests, according to the reformist news website Aftab, were documentary filmmaker Mohammad Rasoulof and his cameraman.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Depending on your point of view, "This Is Not a Film" both is and isn't a film. What it is for sure is the only kind of film its co-director Jafar Panahi can make for now. Panahi is not just one of Iran's top filmmakers, he is its most politically outspoken, director of such works as "Offside," "The Circle" and "Crimson Gold" that deal even more directly than the Oscar-winning "A Separation" with the restrictions placed on ordinary life by that...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2011 | By Susan Stone, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As the Berlin International Film Festival kicked off last week, the upheaval in Egypt was on everyone's lips here in the German capital. But it was the bitter aftermath of Iran's 2009 populist uprising that truly infused this year's Berlinale. The festival jury, headed by Italian actress Isabella Rossellini, was to include Iranian director Jafar Panahiwho won the festival's Silver Bear in 2006 for his film "Offside," about a group of women trying to sneak into a forbidden soccer game.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"A Separation" is totally foreign and achingly familiar. It's a thrilling domestic drama that offers acute insights into human motivations and behavior as well as a compelling look at what goes on behind a particular curtain that almost never gets raised. The early front-runner for the foreign-language Oscar and a rare triple prize winner at the Berlin International Film Festival (it took home the Golden Bear for best film, plus the actor and actress prizes were split among the male and female cast)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Abbas Kiarostami is one of the pillars of Iranian cinema, but because of the turbulent climate at home and his own artistic inquisitiveness, he has recently traveled outside Iran to make his films, in a manner he parallels to the recent vagabond works of Woody Allen. Kiarostami's 2010 film, "Certified Copy," was an enigmatic romance starring Juliette Binoche and opera singer William Shimell set against the timeless beauty of Tuscany. His newest, "Like Someone in Love," which opens Feb. 15 in Los Angeles, finds him further exploring the slippage of identity, this time in a story set in Tokyo.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik, Los Angeles Times
CANNES, France — Cinematically speaking, few countries have experienced as wild a roller coaster ride as Iran in the past 14 months. Over this period, one or more of its filmmakers have a) won the country's first foreign-language Oscar, b) faced an extraordinary ban on filmmaking, c) seen their creative ferment recognized throughout Europe, d) packed up and moved their productions far from the Middle East. "I guess you could say Iranian cinema is in both the best and the worst of times," said Massoud Bakhshi, director of "A Respectable Family," a semi-autobiographical tale about a man haunted by the Iran-Iraq war that premiered at the Cannes Film Festival last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Depending on your point of view, "This Is Not a Film" both is and isn't a film. What it is for sure is the only kind of film its co-director Jafar Panahi can make for now. Panahi is not just one of Iran's top filmmakers, he is its most politically outspoken, director of such works as "Offside," "The Circle" and "Crimson Gold" that deal even more directly than the Oscar-winning "A Separation" with the restrictions placed on ordinary life by that...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"A Separation" is totally foreign and achingly familiar. It's a thrilling domestic drama that offers acute insights into human motivations and behavior as well as a compelling look at what goes on behind a particular curtain that almost never gets raised. The early front-runner for the foreign-language Oscar and a rare triple prize winner at the Berlin International Film Festival (it took home the Golden Bear for best film, plus the actor and actress prizes were split among the male and female cast)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2011 | By Susan Stone, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As the Berlin International Film Festival kicked off last week, the upheaval in Egypt was on everyone's lips here in the German capital. But it was the bitter aftermath of Iran's 2009 populist uprising that truly infused this year's Berlinale. The festival jury, headed by Italian actress Isabella Rossellini, was to include Iranian director Jafar Panahiwho won the festival's Silver Bear in 2006 for his film "Offside," about a group of women trying to sneak into a forbidden soccer game.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
It isn't easy being a serious art-house filmmaker in Iran. Witness the sentencing last year of renowned directors Jafar Panahi and Mohammad Rasoulof to six years in prison and banishment from making movies for 20 years because of their protests of the contested 2009 presidential elections, which saw hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad continue in power. Though Iranian films are shown in international festivals and have distributions in numerous countries, most are never released in Iran.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2013 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Abbas Kiarostami is one of the pillars of Iranian cinema, but because of the turbulent climate at home and his own artistic inquisitiveness, he has recently traveled outside Iran to make his films, in a manner he parallels to the recent vagabond works of Woody Allen. Kiarostami's 2010 film, "Certified Copy," was an enigmatic romance starring Juliette Binoche and opera singer William Shimell set against the timeless beauty of Tuscany. His newest, "Like Someone in Love," which opens Feb. 15 in Los Angeles, finds him further exploring the slippage of identity, this time in a story set in Tokyo.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
It isn't easy being a serious art-house filmmaker in Iran. Witness the sentencing last year of renowned directors Jafar Panahi and Mohammad Rasoulof to six years in prison and banishment from making movies for 20 years because of their protests of the contested 2009 presidential elections, which saw hard-line President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad continue in power. Though Iranian films are shown in international festivals and have distributions in numerous countries, most are never released in Iran.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
White may be making a comeback on the red carpet this award season, if Oscar-winning director Paul Haggis has anything to say about it. FOR THE RECORD: In an earlier version of this article, the age of British-Iranian actress and Amnesty International spokewoman Nazanin Boniadi was given as 39. She's 31. Haggis, the director of "Crash," and others are urging Hollywood stars to pin on white lapel ribbons to register their opposition to...
WORLD
December 21, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
A celebrated Iranian filmmaker and opposition supporter has been sentenced to six years in prison and barred from making films or participating in political activity for two decades, his lawyer said Monday. Jafar Panahi, 50, is the director of internationally renowned Iranian art films such as "The Circle" and "Crimson Gold," which delved into Iran's complex social problems. He was a supporter of the protest movement that sprang to life after the disputed 2009 reelection of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
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