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Jaffe Cohen

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2001 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Screenwriting partners Jaffe Cohen and Christopher Livingston come across like a real-life variation of Neil Simon's "The Odd Couple." Cohen is openly gay, Jewish, cynical and very New York in his sensibilities. Livingston is straight, optimistic and Beverly Hills-bred. So when the pair sat down to write their first feature film script seven years ago, they didn't have to look beyond their own combative but respectful relationship for dramatic inspiration.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2001 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Screenwriting partners Jaffe Cohen and Christopher Livingston come across like a real-life variation of Neil Simon's "The Odd Couple." Cohen is openly gay, Jewish, cynical and very New York in his sensibilities. Livingston is straight, optimistic and Beverly Hills-bred. So when the pair sat down to write their first feature film script seven years ago, they didn't have to look beyond their own combative but respectful relationship for dramatic inspiration.
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BOOKS
September 17, 1995 | Robert Rodi, Robert Rodi is the author of four novels: "Fag Hag," "Closet Case," "What They Did to Princess Paragon" and the forthcoming "Drag Queen" (all Dutton/Plume)
I'm often asked, with regard to gay humor, "Why now?"--as if Oscar Wilde, F. Benson and Noel Coward had been great tragedians. But today I'll choose to interpret the question thus: Why, after so many decades of being famously witty about everything else, are gay people finally pointing satiric fingers at ourselves? The answer, of course, is post-Stonewall liberation. Once Oscar Wilde's "love that dare not speak its name" got double-dared to do so and did, it was only a matter of time before we started making fun of ourselves.
BOOKS
September 17, 1995 | Robert Rodi, Robert Rodi is the author of four novels: "Fag Hag," "Closet Case," "What They Did to Princess Paragon" and the forthcoming "Drag Queen" (all Dutton/Plume)
I'm often asked, with regard to gay humor, "Why now?"--as if Oscar Wilde, F. Benson and Noel Coward had been great tragedians. But today I'll choose to interpret the question thus: Why, after so many decades of being famously witty about everything else, are gay people finally pointing satiric fingers at ourselves? The answer, of course, is post-Stonewall liberation. Once Oscar Wilde's "love that dare not speak its name" got double-dared to do so and did, it was only a matter of time before we started making fun of ourselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1996 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Jaffe Cohen is a comedian's comedian, one with plenty of wit and unerring comic timing. A gay Jew, Cohen has a hybrid style of humor--part Borscht Belt, part quiche belt, with a belt of new age thrown into the mix. Cohen was born and bred in Brooklyn--until the neighborhood went into decline and his family moved to a primarily Catholic enclave on Long Island.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1994 | RICHARD STAYTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Truth in advertising is alive and well at Highways. "Funny Gay Males," the latest comedy act to occupy the Santa Monica alternative theater's stage, delivers as promised. The New York-based trio is funny, gay and male. But what's implied in the title--collective creation by an ensemble operating for a common cause--never materializes. These three guys claim to have been on the road together for five years. But they're not on stage as a troupe more than five minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2001 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Hit and Runway" is a little gem, a sparkling comedy with serious undertones about friendship, self-discovery and artistic integrity. Director Christopher Livingston, who wrote the script with Jeff Cohen, strikes just the right balance between grit and make-believe. First-time feature director Livingston gets terrific performances all around, especially from stars Michael Parducci and Peter Jacobson.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1999 | DIANE HAITHMAN
ART LACMA's Beal to Motor City? Graham W.J. Beal, director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art since 1996, is expected to become the new director of the Detroit Institute of Arts. Currently in Detroit for interviews with institute officials, Beal was unanimously endorsed by the search committee of the institute's board of trustees on Thursday. The endorsement is expected to be approved by the entire board within a few days.
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