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BUSINESS
February 24, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jaguar Announces Recall: Jaguar Cars Inc. recalled about 11,000 of its 1989-91 model V-12 XJS cars to check for a condition which, if unattended, could lead to an engine fire. The company said a high-tension ignition coil could be moved and cause excessive wear on a fuel injector hose. That, in turn, could eventually leak and cause a fire. The company said it was aware of no fires stemming from the problem. Owners were being notified by mail and repairs will be performed for free.
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BUSINESS
September 28, 2002 | Reuters
Ford Motor Co.'s Jaguar luxury car unit will post a full-year 2002 operating loss of about $500 million, Ford President and Chief Operating Officer Nick Scheele said. Despite the loss at Jaguar, Scheele said Ford's Premier Automotive Group, which also includes the Land Rover, Volvo and Aston Martin businesses, was on track to deliver strong revenue growth.
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BUSINESS
May 19, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The last thing Procter & Gamble executives expect to see across from their headquarters is a billboard advertisement featuring Wisk. That, after all, is the dreaded competitor to their No. 1 seller, Liquid Tide. But there the billboard sits--larger then any load of laundry. And imagine trying to get Pepsi's attention with an ad that says: "Hey Coke, bomb the fizz out of Pepsi." Or rousing Nuprin's interest with an ad that beckons: "Hey Advil, neutralize Nuprin."
BUSINESS
June 10, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jaguar Cars' newest California dealership won't open for at least seven months, but the Ford Motor Co.-owned luxury car maker has been quietly working the crowd for two years with an expensive marketing campaign aimed at persuading trendsetters on the Orange County coast that they cannot live without a Jag or two in their garages.
BUSINESS
September 28, 2002 | Reuters
Ford Motor Co.'s Jaguar luxury car unit will post a full-year 2002 operating loss of about $500 million, Ford President and Chief Operating Officer Nick Scheele said. Despite the loss at Jaguar, Scheele said Ford's Premier Automotive Group, which also includes the Land Rover, Volvo and Aston Martin businesses, was on track to deliver strong revenue growth.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1998 | John O'Dell
When Jaguar Cars North America announced last year that it would build a prototype dealership in Mission Viejo, the company promised that it would listen to the community (for Jaguar, that's the community of relatively well-to-do folks who buy its cars) as it planned the facility. It apparently has, and is making several big changes because of what it is hearing.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1998 | John O'Dell
The value of Orange County's market to a purveyor of luxury automobiles is being underscored by the yearlong, identity-building campaign that South Coast Motorcars is mounting. Ground hasn't been broken for the dealership and auto spa, which will sell and care for Jaguars and Aston Martins. But it already has amassed a mailing list of several thousand movers, shakers and big spenders and is building awareness with a series of elegant mailings and publicity events.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1997
The Robb Report, a journal of upscale living, named the new Jaguar XJR sedan its 1998 car of the year during the Greater Los Angeles Auto Show. The car, cited for its "ultimate blend of luxury, performance and style," features a liquid crystal display message center that communicates in 12 languages, a maple and leather interior and a 21-valve V8 engine. The report focuses on consumer concerns of the well-to-do: The average reader has an annual income of $755,000 and net worth of $3.7 million.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1999 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jaguar Cars' newest California dealership won't open for at least seven months, but the Ford Motor Co.-owned luxury car maker has been quietly working the crowd for two years with an expensive marketing campaign aimed at persuading trendsetters on the Orange County coast that they cannot live without a Jag or two in their garages.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1998 | John O'Dell
When Jaguar Cars North America announced last year that it would build a prototype dealership in Mission Viejo, the company promised that it would listen to the community (for Jaguar, that's the community of relatively well-to-do folks who buy its cars) as it planned the facility. It apparently has, and is making several big changes because of what it is hearing.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1998 | John O'Dell
The value of Orange County's market to a purveyor of luxury automobiles is being underscored by the yearlong, identity-building campaign that South Coast Motorcars is mounting. Ground hasn't been broken for the dealership and auto spa, which will sell and care for Jaguars and Aston Martins. But it already has amassed a mailing list of several thousand movers, shakers and big spenders and is building awareness with a series of elegant mailings and publicity events.
BUSINESS
December 31, 1997
The Robb Report, a journal of upscale living, named the new Jaguar XJR sedan its 1998 car of the year during the Greater Los Angeles Auto Show. The car, cited for its "ultimate blend of luxury, performance and style," features a liquid crystal display message center that communicates in 12 languages, a maple and leather interior and a 21-valve V8 engine. The report focuses on consumer concerns of the well-to-do: The average reader has an annual income of $755,000 and net worth of $3.7 million.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jaguar Spokesman Quits: John Crawford, head of public relations for Jaguar Cars in the United States, resigned effective immediately after using a racial slur to describe auto maker Mercedes-Benz in front of a group of Washington journalists May 12, a company official said. Crawford was suspended from his job last week by Michael Dale, president of Jaguar Cars, pending further review, company spokesman Jim Vella said.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1987 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The last thing Procter & Gamble executives expect to see across from their headquarters is a billboard advertisement featuring Wisk. That, after all, is the dreaded competitor to their No. 1 seller, Liquid Tide. But there the billboard sits--larger then any load of laundry. And imagine trying to get Pepsi's attention with an ad that says: "Hey Coke, bomb the fizz out of Pepsi." Or rousing Nuprin's interest with an ad that beckons: "Hey Advil, neutralize Nuprin."
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