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Jail Overcrowding Problem

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1991
In the recent Times editorial, "Cities Should Bite the Bullet, Absorb Fees," The Times backed Senate Bill 2557 and the new policy of the state Legislature to use the already financially troubled cities as another source of revenue in order to resolve its own financial problems. This concerns more than jail-booking fees, since the Legislature also authorized the county to collect fees from cities and school districts for property tax collection. These are services historically furnished to all county residents by county government and paid for by taxes on all county residents.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1999
As the proponent of the Safe and Healthy Communities Initiative and the chairman of the grass-roots Citizens for Safe and Healthy Communities, I am shocked by Sheriff Mike Carona's comments that this measure will force him into expanding the Musick Branch Jail in Lake Forest from 1,100 beds to more than 7,500 (Feb. 19). Carona is barely two months into his term as sheriff, and he has already reneged on his campaign promise not to build a jail near residential communities. Worse, the jail he is intending to "force" on the residents of Lake Forest is over twice the size of San Quentin prison!
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1991
Last week I watched a haunting miniseries on television called "Love, Lies and Murder." This pathetic, true-life story centered on the David Brown family of Garden Grove. It was a murder conspiracy that happened right here in Orange County. Well, I couldn't help but think, what if the County Jail would have been too crowded the day that David Brown was arrested? Would the Sheriff's Department have been forced to cite and release him? The miniseries helped to remind me that very serious criminals do wind up in Orange County jails.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1998
Paperwork mistakes that free prisoners either before or after the proper time still plague the Los Angeles County criminal justice system. That's the bottom line of an internal Sheriff's Department report and the work of Times reporter Tina Daunt. Fewer prisoners were released by accident last year, but another murder suspect was inadvertently released last Friday. He was captured, but that makes six accidental releases of murder suspects in about two years, with three still at large.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1996
During the past 20 years, the people of Orange County have made it abundantly clear that they do not approve of jails in close proximity to homes and families. The James A. Musick Branch Jail expansion plan indicates that county leadership has not received that message. The quality of leadership is evidenced by the quality of resolution of difficult problems. The proposed resolution to the jail overcrowding problem reiterates an apparent cold and callous attitude toward South County residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1998
Paperwork mistakes that free prisoners either before or after the proper time still plague the Los Angeles County criminal justice system. That's the bottom line of an internal Sheriff's Department report and the work of Times reporter Tina Daunt. Fewer prisoners were released by accident last year, but another murder suspect was inadvertently released last Friday. He was captured, but that makes six accidental releases of murder suspects in about two years, with three still at large.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1999
As the proponent of the Safe and Healthy Communities Initiative and the chairman of the grass-roots Citizens for Safe and Healthy Communities, I am shocked by Sheriff Mike Carona's comments that this measure will force him into expanding the Musick Branch Jail in Lake Forest from 1,100 beds to more than 7,500 (Feb. 19). Carona is barely two months into his term as sheriff, and he has already reneged on his campaign promise not to build a jail near residential communities. Worse, the jail he is intending to "force" on the residents of Lake Forest is over twice the size of San Quentin prison!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1987 | JACK E. GOERTZEN, Jack E. Goertzen is presiding judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court
The courts are doing what they can to keep the judicial system moving, but they are only part of the total system that clearly is not working as well as it could. Jail overcrowding is a serious problem in Los Angeles County. While the official capacity for all jails is 12,556, the actual population on any given day is approximately 22,500, about 10,000 more than the system was designed to handle. The figures are mind-boggling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1991
The people have spoken decisively about a proposal to raise sales taxes by a half-cent in order to pay for jails and criminal justice facilities in Orange County. Measure J went down in defeat by an overwhelming margin Tuesday. But the jail overcrowding problem will not go away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1989 | BARRY J. NIDORF, Barry J. Nidorf is chief probation officer of Los Angeles County
The local manifestation of the nationwide epidemic of overcrowded jails, prisons and juvenile facilities became evident recently when Los Angeles County Sheriff Sherman Block was forced, under federal court order, to increase the number of early releases of county prisoners. News of the announcement was accompanied by a disturbing photograph.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1996
During the past 20 years, the people of Orange County have made it abundantly clear that they do not approve of jails in close proximity to homes and families. The James A. Musick Branch Jail expansion plan indicates that county leadership has not received that message. The quality of leadership is evidenced by the quality of resolution of difficult problems. The proposed resolution to the jail overcrowding problem reiterates an apparent cold and callous attitude toward South County residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1991
The people have spoken decisively about a proposal to raise sales taxes by a half-cent in order to pay for jails and criminal justice facilities in Orange County. Measure J went down in defeat by an overwhelming margin Tuesday. But the jail overcrowding problem will not go away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1991
Last week I watched a haunting miniseries on television called "Love, Lies and Murder." This pathetic, true-life story centered on the David Brown family of Garden Grove. It was a murder conspiracy that happened right here in Orange County. Well, I couldn't help but think, what if the County Jail would have been too crowded the day that David Brown was arrested? Would the Sheriff's Department have been forced to cite and release him? The miniseries helped to remind me that very serious criminals do wind up in Orange County jails.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1991
This letter is in response to your editorial "Cities Should Bite the Bullet, Absorb Fees" (Jan. 20), which refers to the county's new authority to impose fees upon cities for booking prisoners into the county jail. This issue is critical to all Orange County residents and deserves the attention cities, the county and The Times have devoted to it. However, your treatment of the causes and implications of the state granting this authority was missing crucial facts. First, the costs associated with booking prisoners into the county jail are paid from property tax revenues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1989 | BARRY J. NIDORF, Barry J. Nidorf is chief probation officer of Los Angeles County
The local manifestation of the nationwide epidemic of overcrowded jails, prisons and juvenile facilities became evident recently when Los Angeles County Sheriff Sherman Block was forced, under federal court order, to increase the number of early releases of county prisoners. News of the announcement was accompanied by a disturbing photograph.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1987 | JACK E. GOERTZEN, Jack E. Goertzen is presiding judge of the Los Angeles County Superior Court
The courts are doing what they can to keep the judicial system moving, but they are only part of the total system that clearly is not working as well as it could. Jail overcrowding is a serious problem in Los Angeles County. While the official capacity for all jails is 12,556, the actual population on any given day is approximately 22,500, about 10,000 more than the system was designed to handle. The figures are mind-boggling.
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