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Jail Space

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1987
The public is becoming accustomed to corrupt politicians and off-the-wall Ouija board decisions of some public officials. However, another classification has creeped into the circle, "The Nimby Syndrome" (not in my backyard). It seems to fit Supervisor George Bailey, from his advocacy to build a county jail on Midway Drive opposite the main Post Office. The supervisor has a county facility in his own district that could be expanded. Crime increases for many reasons, but to force law enforcement into a moratorium on arrests due to lack of jail space is ludicrous and dangerous.
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OPINION
February 9, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
While he was in town late last month to talk with local water agencies and policymakers about the drought, Gov. Jerry Brown also had a lower-profile but just as urgent meeting with Los Angeles County's top criminal justice officials. What is it with you L.A. people, the governor asked, and your resistance to split sentencing? It's a good question, even if it requires a bit of explanation. Under California's AB 109 public safety realignment, low-level felons do their time in county jail instead of state prison, and courts have the option to split their sentences between time behind bars and time under supervised release.
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NATIONAL
October 31, 2009 | Kate Linthicum
More than 50,000 people are arrested across the Navajo reservation each year -- yet there are only 59 jail beds here. Officials say the lack of jail space has led to a revolving door for criminals, most of whom are released within a day of being booked, and few of whom serve out an entire sentence. "It's been a horrendous situation," said Hope MacDonald-Lonetree, a Navajo council delegate. "You can't assure the safety of the police and judges and the prosecutors when you have the perpetrators running around.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2010 | By Jack Leonard
A program that Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca championed three years ago to sharply reduce the early release of jail inmates by placing as many as 2,000 additional offenders on electronic monitoring at home has failed to make a significant dent in the problem. When he first announced the initiative in 2007 and prodded the state Legislature to allow it, Baca touted it as a major step that would free jail space and allow the department to keep more-serious offenders behind bars longer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1992
In response to the early release of a drunk driver due to jail overcrowding, County Supervisor George Bailey has come up with the standard politician's answer to any problem: raise taxes (Letters, April 19). High taxes already have a stranglehold on the economy. We must look elsewhere for a solution before we put everyone out of work. It seems to me that the most logical solution is to stop wasting jail space on prostitutes, drug users and other victimless criminals. Even if we find it morally acceptable to imprison these people for choices they make regarding their bodies, we must realize that we simply cannot afford to continue clogging the court system and the prison system with these harmless "criminals."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 1987
Life in these United States--and the world (in no particular order): covert operations; air safety; Toshiba sales to Russia; nuclear winters; gangs; taxes; crooked TV evangelists; minority problems; lying government officials; the deficit; terrorism; teen-age suicide; freeway shootings; inept President; apartheid; unemployment; AIDS; Middle East; freeway traffic; communism; heart disease; Nicaragua; acid rain; crime; Nazism, 40 years later; starvation; nuclear...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1988
Once again the voters of San Diego County are being asked to increase their taxes because their elected officials are not capable of doing the job they were elected to do, run the county government within budget. We are being asked for the second time in 12 months to again raise the sales tax by an additional one-half percent. Maybe half a percent does not seem like much to the vested-interest people of San Diego, and the people they manage to put into public office. But to those of us in the low- to middle-income groups, the sales tax is the most regressive tax possible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1988 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Discussion of converting a vacant Balboa Park Navy Hospital building into a temporary jail and booking facility ended Wednesday when a San Diego City Council committee killed the idea. The council's Public Services and Safety Committee voted 4-0, with Councilwoman Judy McCarty absent, not to use the building to house prisoners. "To use this building to jail felons is clearly inappropriate," said Councilman Bruce Henderson, a committee member.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1991
Regarding the need for more jail space, how can voters continue to allow elected officials to ignore real solutions to this problem? If voters are scammed into voting for Measure J's half-cent tax, we'll never see any jail space! This will simply give encouragement to a financially unachievable solution. Recently, the county couldn't even open a small expansion of Theo Lacy (jail) because it had no money. Assuming the county takes enough tax money to buy the Gypsum "cure-all" site, how will they afford to build and operate this huge facility?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1991
I wonder how many Orange County citizens realize the costs involved should our legislators fail to insert flexibility into the process to fix the serious wrong of grossly inadequate state dollars to our county. Orange County has been losing over $45.7 million annually since 1986 in funding from the state for public health, indigent adult medical care, alcohol and drug abuse and mental health care. Residents who reply, "What difference do indigent medical services make to me?" need only look at the 20% or so increases which have been coming annually to their own medical insurance.
NATIONAL
October 31, 2009 | Kate Linthicum
More than 50,000 people are arrested across the Navajo reservation each year -- yet there are only 59 jail beds here. Officials say the lack of jail space has led to a revolving door for criminals, most of whom are released within a day of being booked, and few of whom serve out an entire sentence. "It's been a horrendous situation," said Hope MacDonald-Lonetree, a Navajo council delegate. "You can't assure the safety of the police and judges and the prosecutors when you have the perpetrators running around.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2006 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
As new residents pour into Riverside County, the Sheriff's Department has struggled to keep pace with shrinking jail space and increasing demand for community policing. Those are two of the main issues at the center of the race for Riverside County sheriff, which pits incumbent Bob Doyle against two challengers on the June 6 ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2005 | Hugo Martin, Times Staff Writer
With crowded jails forcing law enforcement officials to release about a hundred felons per day, the San Bernardino County Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to lease a private jail in Adelanto that will hold up to 800 inmates. However, some county officials complained that the lease would not solve a long-term problem: The county is growing so fast that it will need to make room for 3,000 more prisoners by 2010.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1997 | JEFF KASS
Some of Orange County's most dangerous juveniles, along with adults convicted in other California courts, will be among those in the new city jail under agreements approved Monday by the City Council. One agreement calls for the Orange County Probation Department to rent 64 cells in the new city jail for juveniles being tried as adults. Police Chief Paul M. Walters said the juveniles have been accused of "very serious" crimes such as murder, assault and kidnapping.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1997 | TINA DAUNT and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On the eve of the official dedication of the massive Twin Towers jail, the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department learned Tuesday that state funds desperately needed to pay for the long-delayed lockup are in jeopardy. Sheriff's officials also acknowledged that a second deal with federal authorities to lease jail space to pay for the operation of Twin Towers is temporarily on hold because the sheriff's Mira Loma facility failed to meet federal standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 1996
Two years ago the Orange County Grand Jury predicted that increasing fear of crime made it more likely that voters would approve higher taxes or bond measures for new jails. But as this month's election showed, that is an idea whose time has not yet come. A statewide bond issue that would have provided $700 million to build new jails and renovate old ones was trounced in Orange County and across California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1989
Unfortunately, your editorial "But There Is an Answer" (March 22) is not at all the answer, but rather only a single element in a complex situation. These so-called assault rifles have been around for years and no one even discussed them. Heretofore, the politically popular target was handguns and specifically "Saturday-night specials;" this year it's trendy to be against semiautomatic rifles. Guns do not shoot by themselves, they require someone to operate them, and that can either be done lawfully or illegally, just like a car (with the same untoward results if either is operated illegally)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1996
Government documents call them LULUs, an appropriate acronym. It means "local undesirable land uses." LULUs are usually found in the neighborhood of NIMBY, or "not in my backyard." These days, Lake Forest and Irvine are ground zero for two LULUs. One is the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station, due to close by 1999, and the proposals that the county use the property for an international civilian airport. The other is the expansion, or transformation, of the James A.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For two days they watched the man who sat quietly in the corner of the town's tiny 60-year-old jail. Who would have thought that, among this group of inmates, was possibly the most hated man in America? He barely spoke, refusing to join in their card games or pranks. And he seemed to pay little attention to the squawk of news bulletins from the jail radio describing the national manhunt for the bombers of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building an hour away in Oklahoma City.
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