Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJail Tax
IN THE NEWS

Jail Tax

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992
The state Supreme Court quashed the county's jails and courts sales tax last month, much to the chagrin of the county supervisors. Ever since, we have heard about the will of the majority being thwarted. It is important that we understand what this majority is. They say that 50.6% of the voters approved the tax, but just what does this mean? Given the low rate of voter registration and the even lower rate of election turnout, what it means is that about 10% of the adult population went to the polls and voted for the tax, and about 10% voted against.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2013
Peter Graf Father of tennis great was jailed for tax fraud Peter Graf, 75, who mentored his daughter, tennis great Steffi Graf, but then went to jail for evading taxes on her earnings, died Nov. 30 at his home in Mannheim, Germany, his family said. German media reported last year that he had pancreatic cancer. Graf, who sold used cars and had other businesses, placed a sawed-off tennis racket in his daughter's hand before she was 4 years old, rewarding her with ice cream when she was able to sustain long rallies on an improvised tennis court in the family living room.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1990 | BOB SCHWARTZ
Orange County will join an appeal of a Sacramento judge's ruling that found the county's plan to raise the sales tax one-half cent to pay for new jails unconstitutional, County Counsel Adrian Kuyper said Tuesday. Orange County and five other counties had hoped to place on the ballot separate half-cent sales tax measures requiring simple majority approval.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 2013 | By August Brown
Pop-rapper Ja Rule had quite a streak of radio hits and Grammy nods in the early 2000s. Now he's nearing the end of a different streak - his legal woes. The 36-year-old, born Jeffrey Atkins, had been in a New York state prison on illegal-gun-possession charges, serving the better part of a two-year sentence. Upon his release, he promptly went back into a New York City clink to finish a sentence resulting from tax evasion charges. The charges stemmed from a period between 2004 and 2006 when the singer failed to pay taxes on more than $3 million in income, resulting in a bill of just more than $1 million dollars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1991 | SHANNON SANDS
The Tustin City Council passed a resolution Monday night opposing Measure J, which would raise the county sales tax one-half cent to pay for the construction and operation of a new county jail. Alex Carrassi, treasurer of Taxpayers Against J, told the council that if voters approve the measure, and Gov. Pete Wilson's proposal to raise sales taxes goes forward, the new tax rate could become more than 8 cents per dollar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1992
With little debate, the County Board of Supervisors took the first step Tuesday toward asking voters to approve another half-cent sales tax increase for construction and operation of courts and jails. The supervisors voted unanimously to seek state legislation that would allow them to place the issue before voters on the November ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1991
Last week I watched a haunting miniseries on television called "Love, Lies and Murder." This pathetic, true-life story centered on the David Brown family of Garden Grove. It was a murder conspiracy that happened right here in Orange County. Well, I couldn't help but think, what if the County Jail would have been too crowded the day that David Brown was arrested? Would the Sheriff's Department have been forced to cite and release him? The miniseries helped to remind me that very serious criminals do wind up in Orange County jails.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1991 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a lively debate over Measure J at a Santa Ana Rotary Club luncheon meeting Wednesday, the Rotarians took a straw poll in which the jail tax initiative on next Tuesday's ballot was given the thumbs down by a margin of more than 4 to 1. Some Rotarians said that although new jail facilities are needed, now is not the time to raise taxes to pay for them. They also said their 37 to 9 vote against Measure J could reflect the sentiment of voters countywide.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sheriff Brad Gates on Friday turned a court hearing on contempt charges into a political forum to stump for the jail tax initiative on next month's ballot and to criticize opponents of a plan to build a jail in Gypsum Canyon. Gates took the witness stand to explain to Presiding Municipal Judge Richard W. Stanford Jr. why he cited and released 18 inmates last year in violation of state law barring such releases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1992 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still seeking the money to build critically needed courts and jails, two San Diego County supervisors are proposing to again ask voters for approval of a special half-cent sales tax that would generate hundreds of millions of dollars. Unlike the the 1988 ballot proposition that was ruled unconstitutional by the California Supreme Court last year, the measure proposed for the fall ballot would require a two-thirds majority for passage--a total that will be difficult to attain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2006 | Claire Noland, Times Staff Writer
Norman Vroman, the unconventional district attorney of Mendocino County who defended the rights of gun owners and medical marijuana advocates and was elected despite having gone to prison for failing to pay income tax, has died. He was 69. A Los Angeles native who spent the early part of his legal career in Southern California, Vroman died Sept. 21 at a hospital in Santa Rosa, Calif. He had suffered a heart attack at his home in Hopland, 100 miles north of San Francisco, three days earlier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1992
With little debate, the County Board of Supervisors took the first step Tuesday toward asking voters to approve another half-cent sales tax increase for construction and operation of courts and jails. The supervisors voted unanimously to seek state legislation that would allow them to place the issue before voters on the November ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1992 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Still seeking the money to build critically needed courts and jails, two San Diego County supervisors are proposing to again ask voters for approval of a special half-cent sales tax that would generate hundreds of millions of dollars. Unlike the the 1988 ballot proposition that was ruled unconstitutional by the California Supreme Court last year, the measure proposed for the fall ballot would require a two-thirds majority for passage--a total that will be difficult to attain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1992 | MARY HELEN BERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Former Orange Unified School District administrator Steven L. Presson, whose connection with a kickback scheme rocked the district, was sentenced in federal court Monday to six months in a halfway house and three years' probation for filing false income tax returns. The former maintenance officer was convicted last November on two felony counts of failing to report $69,000 in income.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1992
Jack Sanders (Letters to The Times, Jan. 12) seems to have several problems with reality. A majority in any vote is measured against the number of those voting, not the number of citizens or registered voters. Therefore, 50.6% of those voting is a majority. And I suspect that more of our citizens would register and vote if it were not for the "crybabies" who resort to "legal challenges" after they lose a vote. Jack also complains because the proponents of the "jail tax" tried to encourage voters to go to the polls and vote for the proposition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1992
Now we have the jail-tax debacle. Let's see if I have this right? It was an unconstitutional tax because it wasn't passed by two-thirds of the vote. The court said the purpose of the commission set up to front for the issue was to subvert the process and the two-thirds vote requirement. The court said the money had to be returned. Pretty clear to me. They got caught with their hand in the till. Are they sorry? Repentant? Contrite? Promise to follow the law in the future? Not on your life!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1991 | DANA PARSONS
Let us not talk falsely now The hour is getting late. When Bob Dylan wrote those lyrics for "All Along the Watchtower," he wasn't talking about the debate over building a new Orange County jail, but Mr. Dylan was nothing if not prescient. On Tuesday, you can go to the polls and vote on whether to increase the local sales tax a half-cent to pay for a huge new jail. If you're like most people I know, you're probably confused about which way to vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1988 | JENIFER WARREN, Times Staff Writer
For the second time in seven months, San Diego County voters have opened their wallets and agreed to shoulder an increase in the local sales tax, narrowly endorsing a ballot proposition expected to generate $1.6 billion for the construction of courts and jails. At the same time, however, residents rejected a plea by county officials for permission to exceed a state-imposed spending cap that bars San Diego from access to millions of dollars in local taxes and state grants.
NEWS
January 15, 1992 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most San Diegans favor a new sales tax to build jails and courts similar to the half-cent measure recently ruled unconstitutional by the state Supreme Court, and also feel that the $330 million collected to date should be used to improve criminal justice facilities, rather than be refunded to taxpayers, a Los Angeles Times Poll shows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992
The state Supreme Court quashed the county's jails and courts sales tax last month, much to the chagrin of the county supervisors. Ever since, we have heard about the will of the majority being thwarted. It is important that we understand what this majority is. They say that 50.6% of the voters approved the tax, but just what does this mean? Given the low rate of voter registration and the even lower rate of election turnout, what it means is that about 10% of the adult population went to the polls and voted for the tax, and about 10% voted against.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|