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Jaime Cardona

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1992
The City Council on Wednesday awarded $675,000 to a San Fernando Valley man who was paralyzed after being hit by a shotgun blast fired by one of two female police officers who tried to detain him in 1988. The action settles a $10-million federal Civil Rights Act lawsuit filed against the city by Jaime Cardona, 29, of North Hills. Cardona's lawsuit alleged he was wrongfully shot by Officer Peggy Moseley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday awarded $675,000 to a San Fernando Valley man who was paralyzed after being hit by a shotgun blast fired by one of two female police officers who tried to detain him in 1988. The action settles a $10-million federal Civil Rights Act lawsuit filed against the city by Jaime Cardona, 29, of North Hills. Cardona's lawsuit alleged that he was wrongfully shot by Officer Peggy Moseley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday awarded $675,000 to a San Fernando Valley man who was paralyzed after being hit by a shotgun blast fired by one of two female police officers who tried to detain him in 1988. The action settles a $10-million federal Civil Rights Act lawsuit filed against the city by Jaime Cardona, 29, of North Hills. Cardona's lawsuit alleged that he was wrongfully shot by Officer Peggy Moseley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1992
The City Council on Wednesday awarded $675,000 to a San Fernando Valley man who was paralyzed after being hit by a shotgun blast fired by one of two female police officers who tried to detain him in 1988. The action settles a $10-million federal Civil Rights Act lawsuit filed against the city by Jaime Cardona, 29, of North Hills. Cardona's lawsuit alleged he was wrongfully shot by Officer Peggy Moseley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1990
A jury deadlocked Wednesday in the trial of a Sepulveda man, paralyzed from the waist down after he was shot by a police officer during a 1988 scuffle, who was accused of assault for his part in the incident. Jaime Cardona is scheduled to return to San Fernando Superior Court on July 11 to have a new trial date set. Cardona was shot as he scuffled with Los Angeles police officers outside his apartment at Columbus Avenue and Parthenia Place on March 23, 1988.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1988
A 25-year-old Sepulveda man, paralyzed from the waist down after he was shot by a police officer following a scuffle, was ordered Monday to stand trial for assaulting the officer. San Fernando Municipal Court Judge Gregg Marcus ruled that there is sufficient evidence to hold Jaime Cardona for trial on the felony assault charge and on a misdemeanor charge of driving in the city with a loaded firearm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1988 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Times Staff Writer
Two people who saw a Sepulveda man shot by a police officer testified Thursday that he was unarmed and had his hands behind his back when he was shot. Jaime Cardona, 25, paralyzed from the waist down in the shooting, is charged with assaulting a police officer and several lesser crimes stemming from an altercation March 23 with two policewomen outside his apartment building.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 1988 | CLAUDIA PUIG, Times Staff Writer
A Sepulveda man has filed lawsuit alleging that a Los Angeles police officer shot him in the stomach without cause, paralyzing him from the waist down. Jaime Cardona, 25, was shot as he was being handcuffed by an officer March 23. The $10-million lawsuit alleges that he was "negligently . . . carelessly and intentionally assaulted and battered" by officers Jayne Weaver and Peggy Mosley, who along with the city, are named as defendants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2004 | Matt Lait and Scott Glover, Times Staff Writers
Officer Jeff Nolte was leading a drug raid on a motel in Gardena when a suspected cocaine dealer pointed a shotgun at him. Nolte fired two shots "in immediate defense of his life," hitting the suspect, Leonard Robinson, in the hands and disarming him. At least that was the story told by the Los Angeles Police Department. Seeing no reason to doubt it, the Police Commission ruled the shooting "in policy." Nolte was officially in the clear.
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