Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJaime Escalante
IN THE NEWS

Jaime Escalante

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
January 15, 1989
"The Escalante Equation" presents the reader with a dilemma. The caption under Jaime Escalante's photograph on Page 25 refers to one of his instructors in Bolivia as "a priest who told dirty jokes." On reading the body of the article, one learns that the teacher who told the "dirty jokes" was not a priest but rather "a sour-tongued Chilean layman named Lincoyan Portus . . . . (who) would begin each class with a story, usually obscene." LILLIAN TOSCAS Torrance
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2011 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Garfield High physical education teacher Rosa Velasquez and students from her drill and cheer teams were two weeks from staging a production of "Grease" in the school's historic auditorium when a three-alarm arson blaze gutted the East Los Angeles landmark. That was four years ago. Since then, her students have performed in the gymnasium, in classrooms and even on muddy fields as funding issues, insurance disputes and other hurdles have delayed reconstruction. On Monday, two days after classes ended, work was finally scheduled to get underway on a $50-million rebuilding project that promises a new, state-of-the-art facility as well as a replacement of the main administration building, which was connected to the auditorium and also sustained fire damage.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2010
Garfield High will pay tribute to prominent former math teacher Jaime Escalante on Thursday at the East L.A. campus with a gathering of the school's ROTC, leadership students, band and drill team, administrators, staff and current and former students. The memorial service for Escalante, who died Tuesday at age 79, is planned from 7 to 7:20 a.m. at 5101 E. 6th St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2010 | By Jill Leovy
They came old and young, in Sunday best and football jerseys, some who knew Jaime Escalante, and others who knew only his legacy. As in life, the famed math teacher, who died of bladder cancer March 30 at age 79, welcomed them all. Friday's wake in a lecture hall at Garfield High School had an atmosphere that was part memorial, part church social: somber and festive at the same time, with mortuary workers and mariachis mingling on the school's sunlit...
OPINION
April 2, 2010
Escalante's lessons Re "Jaime Escalante 1930-2010: Maverick fought for academic equity," Obituary, March 31 I was saddened to read of the passing of famed teacher Jaime Escalante. He reminded us of universal truths about education: An excellent teacher can make a huge difference in a child's life; poor children, like children everywhere, are capable of high achievement; even the best teachers need the involvement of the student and the support of the family; student achievement is affected by "administrative turnover and cultural differences."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2010 | By Elaine Woo
Jaime Escalante, the charismatic former East Los Angeles high school teacher who taught the nation that inner-city students could master subjects as demanding as calculus, died Tuesday. He was 79. The subject of the 1988 film "Stand and Deliver," Escalante died at his son's home in Roseville, Calif., said actor Edward James Olmos, who portrayed the teacher in the film. Escalante had bladder cancer. "Jaime didn't just teach math. Like all great teachers, he changed lives," Olmos said earlier this month when he organized an appeal for funds to help pay Escalante's mounting medical bills.
OPINION
March 13, 2010
Life lessons Re "From sickbed, Garfield legend is still delivering," March 7 Bravo for following the story of former Garfield High School teacher Jaime Escalante, the legendary Advanced Placement calculus instructor introduced to Americans in the film "Stand And Deliver," which chronicled his work in the classroom. Hats off to the wonderful inspiration he gave all of us, and may his life remain an example for us in years to come. Maybe one of his former students could come forth to fund a scholarship or plaque at Garfield.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1990
Your editorial "Escalante's Defeat Amid Triumph" Feb. 23 really sums up the expressed frustration that teachers have had with the educational bureaucracy for years. Jaime Escalante has been fighting against the windmills like a Don Quixote for years. He has made the impossible dream for the Latinos at Garfield High a reality. Many of them are not quitting school but they are going on to college at a great success rate. Jaime Escalante, I am not jealous of you; I admire you for what you've done.
NEWS
February 24, 1991 | SUSAN KING
Until three years ago, most of America hadn't heard of Jaime Escalante, a mathematics teacher at Garfield High School in East Los Angeles. That all changed in 1988 with "Stand and Deliver," a feature film dramatization of Escalante's inspirational teaching methods that led his students from low-income families to beat the odds and pass an Advanced Placement Calculus Test.
NEWS
May 23, 1995 | GARY LIBMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's cold and rainy at 8 a.m. on a recent Saturday. The northeast corner of the campus at Hiram Johnson High School is empty. The quiet is broken as Jaime Escalante unlocks a campus gate. Escalante, whose success teaching calculus to underachieving Latino students at Garfield High in Los Angeles became famous through the 1988 movie "Stand and Deliver," parks his car between rows of classrooms and opens his room for voluntary tutoring. At 8:10, a student arrives munching a submarine sandwich.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2010 | By Elaine Woo
Dignitaries and former students of Jaime Escalante, the celebrated math teacher whose success teaching calculus brought distinction to Garfield High School, are expected to participate in a large public memorial next week. The farewell will begin with a wake starting at 2 p.m. April 16 in Escalante's former classroom at Garfield in East Los Angeles. "We are reconstituting his old classroom" so it will appear as it was during Escalante's tenure in the 1980s, actor Edward James Olmos, who portrayed the acclaimed teacher in the 1988 movie "Stand and Deliver" and is organizing the memorial with Escalante's family, said in an interview Thursday.
OPINION
April 4, 2010 | By Jay Mathews
Anyone who has seen the film "Stand and Deliver," the story of East Los Angeles math teacher Jaime Escalante -- who died Tuesday of cancer at age 79 -- will remember the character Ana Delgado. She was the Escalante student whose father made her work at his restaurant. In the movie, the teacher goes there one night and persuades the father to put a desk in the back so she can do her homework. The film started a movement to open Advanced Placement courses to all students and sparked national discussions, still going on, about what makes a good teacher.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 2010 | Sandy Banks
High expectations . That's been the shorthand explanation for the accomplishments of Garfield High math teacher Jaime Escalante, whose death on Tuesday prompted tributes from Washington, D.C., to East Los Angeles. Escalante was lionized in the 1987 movie "Stand and Deliver" for turning barrio kids into calculus whizzes by stressing hard work and high standards. But could it really be as simple as that? I went to Escalante's former students to find out what his legacy tells us. :: Anthony Garcia wasn't one of Jaime Escalante's calculus stars.
OPINION
April 2, 2010
Escalante's lessons Re "Jaime Escalante 1930-2010: Maverick fought for academic equity," Obituary, March 31 I was saddened to read of the passing of famed teacher Jaime Escalante. He reminded us of universal truths about education: An excellent teacher can make a huge difference in a child's life; poor children, like children everywhere, are capable of high achievement; even the best teachers need the involvement of the student and the support of the family; student achievement is affected by "administrative turnover and cultural differences."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2010
Garfield High will pay tribute to prominent former math teacher Jaime Escalante on Thursday at the East L.A. campus with a gathering of the school's ROTC, leadership students, band and drill team, administrators, staff and current and former students. The memorial service for Escalante, who died Tuesday at age 79, is planned from 7 to 7:20 a.m. at 5101 E. 6th St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2010 | By Elaine Woo
Jaime Escalante, the charismatic former East Los Angeles high school teacher who taught the nation that inner-city students could master subjects as demanding as calculus, died Tuesday. He was 79. The subject of the 1988 film "Stand and Deliver," Escalante died at his son's home in Roseville, Calif., said actor Edward James Olmos, who portrayed the teacher in the film. Escalante had bladder cancer. "Jaime didn't just teach math. Like all great teachers, he changed lives," Olmos said earlier this month when he organized an appeal for funds to help pay Escalante's mounting medical bills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1991 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the protesters bearing signs demanding that "Jaime Must Stay!" Garfield High School's most famous teacher prepared to say goodby to the East Los Angeles campus Tuesday--but not without delivering a few parting shots at colleagues who have opposed him.
OPINION
March 13, 2010
Life lessons Re "From sickbed, Garfield legend is still delivering," March 7 Bravo for following the story of former Garfield High School teacher Jaime Escalante, the legendary Advanced Placement calculus instructor introduced to Americans in the film "Stand And Deliver," which chronicled his work in the classroom. Hats off to the wonderful inspiration he gave all of us, and may his life remain an example for us in years to come. Maybe one of his former students could come forth to fund a scholarship or plaque at Garfield.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2010 | By Esmeralda Bermudez
There was a time in East Los Angeles when el maestro's el maestro's gruff voice bounced off his classroom walls. He roamed the aisles, he juggled oranges, he dressed in costumes, he punched the air; he called you names, he called your mom, he kicked you out, he lured you in; he danced, he boxed, he screamed, he whispered. He would do anything to get your attention. " Ganas ," he would say. "That's all you need. The desire to learn." Nearly three decades later, Jaime Escalante finds himself far from Garfield High School in East Los Angeles, the place that made him internationally famous for turning a generation of low-income students into calculus whizzes.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|