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Jaime Lerner

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NEWS
April 27, 1993 | MAC MARGOLIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Wooden planks complained slightly as Jaime Lerner climbed with visitors along the spiral boardwalk up to the deck of a lookout tower. At each turn, a different facet of an old rock quarry came into view. Now we faced sheer stone, now a curtain of moss, now a pond dappled by a swan's wake. The walkway wrapped around a structure of rustic wood and orange roof tile. This was Curitiba's Open University for the Environment, though it looked less like a campus than a nature preserve.
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NEWS
April 27, 1993 | MAC MARGOLIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Wooden planks complained slightly as Jaime Lerner climbed with visitors along the spiral boardwalk up to the deck of a lookout tower. At each turn, a different facet of an old rock quarry came into view. Now we faced sheer stone, now a curtain of moss, now a pond dappled by a swan's wake. The walkway wrapped around a structure of rustic wood and orange roof tile. This was Curitiba's Open University for the Environment, though it looked less like a campus than a nature preserve.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2007 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
A couple of weeks ago, a man named Jaime Lerner dropped by City Hall for a visit. Actually it was more like a pep talk for the entire populace of Los Angeles, not to mention the city Planning Department, which had invited him here. Jaime Lerner, of course, is not exactly a household name. In terms of local connections, he is best known as the former mayor of Curitiba, Brazil, the city whose expansive system of busways inspired the Orange Line in the San Fernando Valley.
NEWS
July 17, 1994
For a fraction of the cost of installing a subway, officials in Curitiba, Brazil, set up a first-class Jetsons-like bus network--one so convenient and prompt that 75% take mass transit to work. The bus system in Curitiba, a city of 1.6 million, is everything ours is not: fast, efficient and popular, offering express and short-hop vehicles as well as the ability to readily transfer among different services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2000 | ZEV YAROSLAVSKY, Zev Yaroslavsky is Los Angeles County supervisor for the 3rd District and serves as a member of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority Board of Directors
For the first time in years, the Los Angeles region and particularly the San Fernando Valley have an opportunity to accelerate the development of a regional transportation system that works. Gov. Gray Davis has declared that he intends to use some of the state's multibillion-dollar surplus for transportation capital projects throughout the state. Three of L.A.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2007 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
Long Beach has a population of almost half a million, making it the second largest city in the county of Los Angeles and the fifth most populous in the state. As you may have read, water officials there recently looked at the prospect of tightening water supplies and decided the outlook was bleak enough to impose restrictions. The new rules are hardly draconian, but they do have some bite.
BOOKS
November 26, 1995 | Michael Pollan, Michael Pollan is the author of "Second Nature: A Gardener's Education."
No matter how many more--and better--books he may write, Bill McKibben is destined to be remembered for "The End of Nature," his 1989 bestseller about the greenhouse effect and its effect on, well, Bill McKibben.
TRAVEL
February 18, 1996 | MARGO PFEIFF, Pfeiff is a Montreal-based freelance writer and photographer
A carpet of bright purple and yellow blossoms litters the pathway as I cycle my rented bike through sprawling Barigui Park. Dotted with swans and rowboats to my left is a lake created by a dammed river that flows through the city and whose simple hydraulics now prevent flooding that in past decades drove hundreds from their homes. On my right, a grazing flock of sheep employed by the city is a low-tech way to keep the lawn trimmed and amuse legions of schoolchildren at the same time.
NEWS
March 16, 1985 | JUAN de ONIS, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Albert Sabin, who won a Nobel Prize for his oral polio vaccine, was pleased to learn recently that a public vaccination campaign here in impoverished Cearastate in Brazil's Northeast region had reached 2.5 million children and virtually eradicated the paralyzing disease. But Sabin was shaken, during a visit to the children's hospital that bears his name, by evidence that 70% of the patients admitted to the 170-bed hospital are victims of another disease for which there is no vaccine--hunger.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1998 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Dodge Dakota pickup truck will roll down Chrysler's assembly line near here Tuesday, inaugurating a $315-million plant and launching a new industrial age in this once-pastoral south Brazilian region. It is the first of three car factories going online here in coming months and is a milestone in the remarkably rapid economic development of a part of Brazil better known for coffee, soybeans and bureaucrats.
MAGAZINE
June 29, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, Robin Wright, based in Washington, D.C., covers global affairs for The Times. Her last article for the magazine was a profile of Army legend Alfred M. Baker
One grew up in a Harem, another in the poverty of the Andean highlands, another with an uncle because his parents were suspected of sedition. Some tripped into power; others had ideas that inexorably elevated them to the forefront. The common denominator is that each is a defining force at the end of the 20th century in his or her region--and often well beyond--and symbolizes a new approach or solution to a critical issue of the1990s. Each is, in a word, a leader.
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