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Jaime Paz Zamora

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NEWS
May 7, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Time Staff Writer
Retired Gen. Hugo Banzer, a former Bolivian dictator who won't go away, takes another shot at the presidency today in hotly contested national elections. Most pundits give Banzer, 62, an advantage at the polls over his two main rivals. But the forecasting lacks a sense of certainty, and the other two front-runners are predicting victory. They are Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada, 58, a former planning minister who helped stifle Latin America's worst case of hyperinflation, and Jaime Paz Zamora, 50, a one-time radical leftist who now advocates democratic socialist policies.
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WORLD
August 2, 2002 | ANDREW ENEVER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After weeks of political uncertainty and back-room negotiating, former Bolivian President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada has forged an odd-couple alliance that will enable him to once again lead this troubled Andean nation. Sanchez de Lozada, the conservative leader known locally as Goni, and Jaime Paz Zamora, the leftist fourth-place finisher in June's inconclusive elections, put aside their long-running animosity to unite in what almost certainly will become Bolivia's next government.
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NEWS
August 3, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Democratic socialist Jaime Paz Zamora and former military dictator Hugo Banzer on Wednesday announced a surprising agreement of the left and the right that is expected to give Paz Zamora the Bolivian presidency this weekend. The agreement appeared to end protracted negotiations by political parties in preparation for a presidential run-off vote in Congress on Friday or Saturday.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cartagena summit marked important progress toward harmonizing the once-disparate drug policies of the United States and the three cocaine-producing countries of South America, as well as reinforcing their resolve to fight cocaine traffic together, Latin American officials said Friday. "The results were precisely what we needed, a more aggressive commitment by all of the countries here," said Gen. Miguel Maza Marquez, the commander of Colombia's intelligence police.
WORLD
August 2, 2002 | ANDREW ENEVER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After weeks of political uncertainty and back-room negotiating, former Bolivian President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada has forged an odd-couple alliance that will enable him to once again lead this troubled Andean nation. Sanchez de Lozada, the conservative leader known locally as Goni, and Jaime Paz Zamora, the leftist fourth-place finisher in June's inconclusive elections, put aside their long-running animosity to unite in what almost certainly will become Bolivia's next government.
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Jaime Paz Zamora, a longtime crusader for leftist causes, took office Sunday as president of Bolivia and promised a distinctly conservative economic policy for this impoverished South American country. Paz Zamora, 50, pledged in his inauguration speech to preserve monetary and financial stability, promote private industry, respect the laws of supply and demand and reduce the size of the government.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Jaime Paz Zamora, the new president of Bolivia, says his administration will do its part in the fight against cocaine traffic as long as the cost is not an undue burden on this impoverished country. "Bolivia is prepared to enter this fight, but not (by) paying a bill by itself that others should also pay," Paz Zamora told reporters late Monday, a day after he took office. After neighboring Peru, Bolivia is the world's No. 2 producer of coca leaves, the raw material of cocaine.
NEWS
August 6, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Jaime Paz Zamora has been a candidate for the priesthood, a professional soccer player, a sociology professor, a Marxist radical and a political exile. Now 50, he is a moderate leftist and the next president of Bolivia. With right-wing support, Paz Zamora won a presidential runoff vote in Congress early Saturday and will be inaugurated today. The task he has set for himself is formidable: to launch South America's poorest country on a firm course of social and economic development.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
From Andean highlands to tropical lowlands, Bolivians lined up at the polls Sunday for a presidential election that took South America's poorest country a step beyond its turbulent political past. The leading candidates were Hugo Banzer, 62, a retired general who ruled Bolivia for seven years after a military coup in 1971; Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada, 58, a former planning minister who helped tame runaway inflation in 1985 and 1986, and Jaime Paz Zamora, 50, a moderate leftist who served as vice president in the early 1980s.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The presidents of South America's three principal cocaine-producing countries on Tuesday invited President Bush to a summit within 90 days to forge joint strategies in the "frontal assault" on drug trafficking, and Bush quickly accepted the proposal. Bush expressed his willingness to take part shortly after word of the proposal by Presidents Alan Garcia of Peru, Jaime Paz Zamora of Bolivia and Virgilio Barco Vargas of Colombia reached the White House, spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said. "We accept.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush flew here for his much-heralded summit with three Latin American presidents Thursday and proclaimed after about three hours of meetings that the four nations have formed "the first anti-drug cartel." An 11-page "Declaration of Cartagena" signed by Bush and the presidents of Colombia, Bolivia and Peru said that fighting drug traffic requires effective efforts to reduce demand for drugs in consuming countries and to stimulate economic development in producing countries.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | JAMES F. SMITH and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The presidents of South America's three principal cocaine-producing countries on Tuesday invited President Bush to a summit within 90 days to forge joint strategies in the "frontal assault" on drug trafficking, and Bush quickly accepted the proposal. Bush expressed his willingness to take part shortly after word of the proposal by Presidents Alan Garcia of Peru, Jaime Paz Zamora of Bolivia and Virgilio Barco Vargas of Colombia reached the White House, spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said. "We accept.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Jaime Paz Zamora, the new president of Bolivia, says his administration will do its part in the fight against cocaine traffic as long as the cost is not an undue burden on this impoverished country. "Bolivia is prepared to enter this fight, but not (by) paying a bill by itself that others should also pay," Paz Zamora told reporters late Monday, a day after he took office. After neighboring Peru, Bolivia is the world's No. 2 producer of coca leaves, the raw material of cocaine.
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Jaime Paz Zamora, a longtime crusader for leftist causes, took office Sunday as president of Bolivia and promised a distinctly conservative economic policy for this impoverished South American country. Paz Zamora, 50, pledged in his inauguration speech to preserve monetary and financial stability, promote private industry, respect the laws of supply and demand and reduce the size of the government.
NEWS
August 6, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Jaime Paz Zamora has been a candidate for the priesthood, a professional soccer player, a sociology professor, a Marxist radical and a political exile. Now 50, he is a moderate leftist and the next president of Bolivia. With right-wing support, Paz Zamora won a presidential runoff vote in Congress early Saturday and will be inaugurated today. The task he has set for himself is formidable: to launch South America's poorest country on a firm course of social and economic development.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Democratic socialist Jaime Paz Zamora and former military dictator Hugo Banzer on Wednesday announced a surprising agreement of the left and the right that is expected to give Paz Zamora the Bolivian presidency this weekend. The agreement appeared to end protracted negotiations by political parties in preparation for a presidential run-off vote in Congress on Friday or Saturday.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Cartagena summit marked important progress toward harmonizing the once-disparate drug policies of the United States and the three cocaine-producing countries of South America, as well as reinforcing their resolve to fight cocaine traffic together, Latin American officials said Friday. "The results were precisely what we needed, a more aggressive commitment by all of the countries here," said Gen. Miguel Maza Marquez, the commander of Colombia's intelligence police.
NEWS
February 16, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER and WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush flew here for his much-heralded summit with three Latin American presidents Thursday and proclaimed after about three hours of meetings that the four nations have formed "the first anti-drug cartel." An 11-page "Declaration of Cartagena" signed by Bush and the presidents of Colombia, Bolivia and Peru said that fighting drug traffic requires effective efforts to reduce demand for drugs in consuming countries and to stimulate economic development in producing countries.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
From Andean highlands to tropical lowlands, Bolivians lined up at the polls Sunday for a presidential election that took South America's poorest country a step beyond its turbulent political past. The leading candidates were Hugo Banzer, 62, a retired general who ruled Bolivia for seven years after a military coup in 1971; Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada, 58, a former planning minister who helped tame runaway inflation in 1985 and 1986, and Jaime Paz Zamora, 50, a moderate leftist who served as vice president in the early 1980s.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Time Staff Writer
Retired Gen. Hugo Banzer, a former Bolivian dictator who won't go away, takes another shot at the presidency today in hotly contested national elections. Most pundits give Banzer, 62, an advantage at the polls over his two main rivals. But the forecasting lacks a sense of certainty, and the other two front-runners are predicting victory. They are Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada, 58, a former planning minister who helped stifle Latin America's worst case of hyperinflation, and Jaime Paz Zamora, 50, a one-time radical leftist who now advocates democratic socialist policies.
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