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Jain Religion

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1996 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just inside the entrance to the Jain Center in Buena Park, a spider edges down a silky strand of web on a cubbyhole where visitors place their shoes. Of all the places in the world to weave a web, this spider has chosen well. Adherents of the Jain religion revere even the tiniest of lives, down to the most microscopic of beings. It is a reverence that requires strict vegetarianism, what Dr.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1998 | Associated Press
With song, dance and colorful attire, celebrants of the ancient Jain religion welcomed their first temple in Michigan. The $5-million, 25,000-square-foot temple gives adherents of the religion a place to worship. Jain is based on tolerance and nonviolence. "This is a whole new beginning," said Neil Shah, 16. "When our parents were in India, they could pray in the temple in the morning or in the evening. Now we have that opportunity." The temple is second in size only to the one in Chicago.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1998 | Associated Press
With song, dance and colorful attire, celebrants of the ancient Jain religion welcomed their first temple in Michigan. The $5-million, 25,000-square-foot temple gives adherents of the religion a place to worship. Jain is based on tolerance and nonviolence. "This is a whole new beginning," said Neil Shah, 16. "When our parents were in India, they could pray in the temple in the morning or in the evening. Now we have that opportunity." The temple is second in size only to the one in Chicago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1996 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just inside the entrance to the Jain Center in Buena Park, a spider edges down a silky strand of web on a cubbyhole where visitors place their shoes. Of all the places in the world to weave a web, this spider has chosen well. Adherents of the Jain religion revere even the tiniest of lives, down to the most microscopic of beings. It is a reverence that requires strict vegetarianism, what Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1996 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just inside the entrance to Jain Center in Buena Park, a spider edges down a silky strand of web attached to one of the cubbyholes where visitors place their shoes before entering the temple. Of all the places in the world to weave a web, this spider has chosen well. Adherents of the Jain religion revere even the tiniest of lives, down to the most microscopic of beings. It is a reverence that requires strict vegetarianism, says Jain Assn. leader Dr. Manibhai Mehta.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1994 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
In "The Peaceful Liberators: Jain Art From India," a beautiful new exhibition that opened Sunday at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, a group of more than 20 compelling sculptures are unlike any I've seen before. In fact, they may have no counterparts anywhere in world art.
WORLD
March 8, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
India's Supreme Court on Monday laid out guidelines for the use of euthanasia in extreme situations involving terminally ill patients, even as it rejected a plea for its use in the case of a woman who has been in a vegetative state for nearly four decades. With the decision, India joins a handful of nations ? including Belgium, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Switzerland ? and the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington in allowing some form of euthanasia. India has no law on the issue, making the guidelines legally binding until Parliament passes legislation.
NEWS
December 20, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of thousands of Indian pilgrims who believe that it is a sin to harm even a mosquito converged on a towering statue of granite Sunday to watch its anointment with milk, sugar cane juice and sandalwood paste. For believers in the Jain religion, it was the last chance this century to participate in the sacred and grandiose ceremony, held once every 12 years at the conjunction of heavenly bodies. For public figures, including Prime Minister P.V.
FOOD
October 20, 1994 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York author Rynn Berry is so intent on researching vegetarianism that he lived for three months with a Jain family in Bombay. The most distinctive feature of the Jain religion, founded in the 6th Century BC by an elder contemporary of the Buddha, is its single-minded devotion to the principle of ahimsa (non-injury to animate beings). This has made the Jains India's most rigorous vegetarians.
NEWS
June 4, 2006 | Ramola Talwar Badam, Associated Press Writer
Never mind pets, smokers, or loud music at 2 a.m. House hunters in this city increasingly are being asked, "Do you eat meat?" If yes, the deal is off. As the city of 16 million becomes the cosmopolitan hub of a booming Indian economy, real estate is increasingly intersecting with cuisine. More middle-class Indians are moving in, more of them are vegetarian, and the law is on their side. "Some people are very strict.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1996 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just inside the entrance to Jain Center in Buena Park, a spider edges down a silky strand of web attached to one of the cubbyholes where visitors place their shoes before entering the temple. Of all the places in the world to weave a web, this spider has chosen well. Adherents of the Jain religion revere even the tiniest of lives, down to the most microscopic of beings. It is a reverence that requires strict vegetarianism, says Jain Assn. leader Dr. Manibhai Mehta.
NEWS
September 11, 2005 | Nirmala George, Associated Press Writer
Dressed in a coarse white cotton sari, her hair shorn and a small piece of white cloth covering her mouth, Sadika Sansiddhi looks nothing like other 17-year-olds. Two years ago, she left the comfort of her middle class home to become a nun in the ancient Jain religion practiced by more than 4 million people in India. Her parents and grandparents opposed her decision. They are Jains, and believe in the small daily sacrifices the religion demands.
TRAVEL
October 24, 2004 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
Antwerp was damp and dull -- not unusual, I gather -- when I arrived by train one morning in early October. The lofty glass and stone of Central Station looked as though it needed a good cleaning, and the square in front was bordered by a shopworn jumble of buildings, without the Flemish medieval charm of nearby Bruges and Ghent. But the Belgian port on the River Scheldt has its own inner dazzle.
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