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NEWS
October 20, 1987 | Associated Press
Two passenger trains collided head-on during the Monday morning rush hour, killing 102 people and injuring about 300, authorities reported. Many of the victims were schoolchildren. Some passengers jumped free just in time. Most were riding on the roof or between cars on the packed Jakarta-bound train, which was going 30 m.p.h., and saw the other one approaching on the single track at the same speed.
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TRAVEL
January 10, 1999
My friend and I just returned from a two-week vacation in Bali--an incredible package tour for under $900. We were prompted to go by your "Bali Low" article (Oct. 11). And indeed, prices on the island were at times unbelievable (gourmet dinners for $5 a person, hotel rooms for $10 a night or less), and the dramatic landscape, warm people and fascinating culture were everything we'd hoped for. But despite our insistent pleas, many of our friends are still reluctant to go to Bali because of the political disturbances in the capital of Jakarta and other parts of Indonesia.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1998 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Indonesia's capital city deteriorated further Thursday and anti-government protesters closed the roads to Jakarta's airport and seaport, Mattel, Arco, Hewlett-Packard, Citibank and other beleaguered U.S. firms began closing their plants and offices, evacuating personnel and making contingency plans to move operations elsewhere. And while U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
There is a scene midway through Gareth Evans' action-crime thriller "The Raid 2" that exemplifies the excruciating and exhilarating experience of this gripping paean to the ballet, brutality and blood that courses through martial arts films. The players are not the key ones, but the action is exquisite as two attractive 20-ish Indonesian assassins, a brother-sister team, identify their target in a subway car. Amid tight space and other passengers, Hammer Girl, a mesmerizing Julie Estelle, her long hair swinging in time with the claw hammers she wields, approaches the prey; her brother, Baseball Bat Man (Very Tri Yulisman)
NEWS
December 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
Bombs exploded outside churches in Jakarta and five other Indonesian cities and towns on Christmas Eve, killing at least 14 people, injuring dozens and worsening the already difficult relations between Muslims and Christians throughout the fractured archipelago. The blasts--including one outside Jakarta's main Roman Catholic church, near the presidential palace and the main mosque--occurred as prayer services were about to get underway Sunday night.
NEWS
March 21, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
An Indonesian court acquitted three militiamen in the murder of a U.N. peacekeeper, a move likely to bolster skepticism over Jakarta's efforts to punish those responsible for violence in East Timor. Judge Iskandar Tjake said there was not enough evidence to convict the men--clad in Indonesia's national colors of red and white--of killing Pvt. Leonard Manning, 24, of New Zealand in July 2000. Prosecutor Firdaus Dewilmar said he would appeal.
NEWS
November 8, 1994
President Clinton will visit Jakarta next Monday and Tuesday for meetings with Asian government leaders. On Monday, he will hold bilateral sessions with Chinese President Jiang Zemin, Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama and other government chiefs. Tuesday, Clinton and the others will convene at Indonesian President Suharto's summer palace for the second annual summit meeting of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) nations.
WORLD
February 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Deadly floods that swamped the Indonesian capital, Jakarta, have begun to recede, but much of the city remained covered with filthy water. Flooding and related problems, such as downed power lines, have killed at least 50 people and forced more than 220,000 from their homes, but some were returning as the water levels dropped. Thousands of people had sought shelter in government buildings, schools and mosques. Overcrowding and unsanitary conditions sparked fear of waterborne diseases.
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