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Jake Butcher

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NEWS
April 22, 1985 | Associated Press
Jake Butcher, whose rise to political and financial heights ended in one of America's worst bank crashes, pleaded guilty today to 16 counts of bank fraud and 4 counts of income tax evasion. The Butcher-related bank failures left the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. holding $699 million in uncollectible loans. The two-time unsuccessful candidate for governor of Tennessee and organizer of the 1982 World's Fair faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.
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BUSINESS
April 23, 1985 | Associated Press
Jake Butcher, the entrepreneur whose glittering financial empire crumbled in one of the worst bank crashes in U.S. history, pleaded guilty to bank fraud Monday and agreed to plead guilty to additional charges in coming weeks. The plea-bargaining agreement culminated a two-year federal investigation of Butcher-related bank failures that left the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. holding $699 million in uncollectable loans. Butcher entered guilty pleas to eight counts of bank fraud, and he told U.S.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1989
Please correct the mistaken impression given to your readers by the figure of "17,000 new trees" often quoted by your paper. This is the replacement number to be planted by the landfill company, Browning-Ferris Industries, in its proposed Sunshine Canyon landfill extension area. However, the environmental impact report gives a different picture. Volume III states that "small planting stock (2-inch-by-2-inch-by-6-inch containers with open bottoms) will be used for most planting. . . .
NEWS
August 31, 1986
A federal jury in Chattanooga, Tenn., found C. H. Butcher Jr. not guilty of charges that he lied to investors and covered up insider loans that led to the 1983 bankruptcy of his finance company. The jury cleared Butcher, 49, younger brother of convicted bank-fraud felon Jake Butcher, of 25 counts of mail, wire and securities fraud. The bankruptcy cost 5,000 uninsured investors more than $25 million, prosecutors said. Butcher had faced up to 115 years in prison and $25,000 in fines if convicted.
NEWS
June 20, 1985 | Associated Press
Jake Butcher, a two-time candidate for governor and 1982 World's Fair chairman, pleaded guilty today to four counts of income tax evasion and received a 14-year prison term to run concurrently with a previous 20-year sentence for bank fraud. U.S. District Judge William Bertelsman said Butcher, a rags-to-riches banker, had been trusted with tremendous responsibility but had misused his talents and the maximum possible sentence was required.
BUSINESS
November 27, 1989
Please correct the mistaken impression given to your readers by the figure of "17,000 new trees" often quoted by your paper. This is the replacement number to be planted by the landfill company, Browning-Ferris Industries, in its proposed Sunshine Canyon landfill extension area. However, the environmental impact report gives a different picture. Volume III states that "small planting stock (2-inch-by-2-inch-by-6-inch containers with open bottoms) will be used for most planting. . . .
NEWS
August 31, 1986
A federal jury in Chattanooga, Tenn., found C. H. Butcher Jr. not guilty of charges that he lied to investors and covered up insider loans that led to the 1983 bankruptcy of his finance company. The jury cleared Butcher, 49, younger brother of convicted bank-fraud felon Jake Butcher, of 25 counts of mail, wire and securities fraud. The bankruptcy cost 5,000 uninsured investors more than $25 million, prosecutors said. Butcher had faced up to 115 years in prison and $25,000 in fines if convicted.
NEWS
June 20, 1985 | Associated Press
Jake Butcher, a two-time candidate for governor and 1982 World's Fair chairman, pleaded guilty today to four counts of income tax evasion and received a 14-year prison term to run concurrently with a previous 20-year sentence for bank fraud. U.S. District Judge William Bertelsman said Butcher, a rags-to-riches banker, had been trusted with tremendous responsibility but had misused his talents and the maximum possible sentence was required.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1985
The Tennessee financier, still facing bankruptcy after the collapse of his two-state banking empire, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in London, Ky., to a third series of bank fraud charges. Butcher, who previously entered guilty pleas before federal judges in Tennessee, had been accused in Kentucky of defrauding former United American Banks in Lexington and Somerset by siphoning off $4.2 million for business and personal expenses.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1985
Butcher, whose $3-billion business empire collapsed in one of the biggest bank failures in U.S. history, pleaded guilty to bank fraud in U.S. District Court in Memphis, Tenn., for the second time in eight days. Butcher, 48, admitted using forged signatures to defraud United American Bank of Memphis out of $1.5 million. He pleaded guilty to three counts of bank fraud and one count of mail fraud as part of a deal that guaranteed him no more than 20 years in a federal prison.
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