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Jake Heggie

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armistead Maupin created legions of fans with his "Tales of the City" stories, first serialized in the San Francisco Chronicle in the mid-'70s, then published in books and later broadcast over PBS and Showtime in two miniseries. People who wanted the stories to go on forever can find a little comfort when San Francisco composer Jake Heggie's "Anna Madrigal Remembers"--set to a new Maupin text--makes its Southern California premiere Saturday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
The Los Angeles Public Library has been obsessing over “Moby Dick” lately,  with celebrity readings, discussions, scientific studies, family days, film screenings and whatnot. Its “Whatever Happened to Moby Dick?” will now wind up Saturday night with “My Moby Dick” at the Broad Stage. In what is described as a multimedia voyage, Stacy Keach, Alan Mandell, Shohreh Aghdashloo and others expect to pursue this particular literary great white whale from a variety of points of physical, metaphysical and fantastical points of view.  The director is David Schweizer, who not only has been responsible for some of Long Beach Opera's most outrageously effective productions (Purcell's “Indian Queen” and Thomas Adès' “Powder Her Face”)
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1996 | David Mermelstein, David Mermelstein writes about the arts for newspapers and magazines
Driving around this city with Jake Heggie, one can feel his barely contained enthusiasm. The 35-year-old composer is just starting to reap recognition's rewards, and he speaks animatedly and volubly about his newfound good fortune. Heggie, who works in the public relations department of the San Francisco Opera, is especially high on his adopted city, for it's here that he has found his voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2012 | By Diane Haithman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
— Canadian tenor Ben Heppner is a versatile performer, but Tinker Bell he's not. Yet this mountain of a man will be flying as Captain Ahab in San Diego Opera's West Coast premiere of the opera "Moby-Dick. " The production sets sail Saturday at San Diego's Civic Theatre. At a recent rehearsal of the new opera by Jake Heggie — who made a splash with his first opera, "Dead Man Walking," in 2000 — the imposing Heppner was standing at the back of a cavernous rehearsal space in the Civic Theatre complex, wrapped in ropes and leaning on the cane that is part of the costume package for Captain Ahab, whose wooden peg leg replaces the limb bitten off by the great white whale in Herman Melville's sprawling 1851 novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2012 | By Diane Haithman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
— Canadian tenor Ben Heppner is a versatile performer, but Tinker Bell he's not. Yet this mountain of a man will be flying as Captain Ahab in San Diego Opera's West Coast premiere of the opera "Moby-Dick. " The production sets sail Saturday at San Diego's Civic Theatre. At a recent rehearsal of the new opera by Jake Heggie — who made a splash with his first opera, "Dead Man Walking," in 2000 — the imposing Heppner was standing at the back of a cavernous rehearsal space in the Civic Theatre complex, wrapped in ropes and leaning on the cane that is part of the costume package for Captain Ahab, whose wooden peg leg replaces the limb bitten off by the great white whale in Herman Melville's sprawling 1851 novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
An inveterate story teller, Johana Harris-Heggie nevertheless seems to avoid reminiscing--she lives and laughs in the present. But Roy Harris' widow, now remarried, can sometimes be persuaded to look back. The other afternoon, for instance, at the end of a long day of teaching at UCLA, the veteran pianist, who will be 76 in January, seemed in the mood for short forays into the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
The Los Angeles Public Library has been obsessing over “Moby Dick” lately,  with celebrity readings, discussions, scientific studies, family days, film screenings and whatnot. Its “Whatever Happened to Moby Dick?” will now wind up Saturday night with “My Moby Dick” at the Broad Stage. In what is described as a multimedia voyage, Stacy Keach, Alan Mandell, Shohreh Aghdashloo and others expect to pursue this particular literary great white whale from a variety of points of physical, metaphysical and fantastical points of view.  The director is David Schweizer, who not only has been responsible for some of Long Beach Opera's most outrageously effective productions (Purcell's “Indian Queen” and Thomas Adès' “Powder Her Face”)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2008 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
With 22 seasons under its belt, Pacific Serenades still makes a major point of trying to freshen the chamber music repertoire with newly commissioned works. Sunday afternoon in Pasadena's Neighborhood Church, the series presented its 90th commission -- the U.S. premiere of "Friendly Persuasions," a song cycle for tenor by Jake Heggie (composer of opera's "Dead Man Walking") built on a great idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2000 | MARK SWED, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
We Americans pride ourselves on being a direct, sensible people. We celebrate straight shooters, straight talkers, straight whiskey and straight stories. We like explanations, not ambiguity. We expect our day in court, clear and rational arguments, unbiased judgments, no loose ends. We are not, as is Italy, an operatic nation. Just compare the original American western with its spaghetti imitation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2000 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
A towering black grid of square and rectangular cubicles looms at the back of a rehearsal hall stage. It is meant to represent both physical and psychological space--prison cells as much as the interior of the mind--and its very size suggests the insurmountability of the human conflicts unfolding in its shadow. On stage in front of the massive structure, a group of men and women sing a scene fraught with pain and discord.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2008 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
With 22 seasons under its belt, Pacific Serenades still makes a major point of trying to freshen the chamber music repertoire with newly commissioned works. Sunday afternoon in Pasadena's Neighborhood Church, the series presented its 90th commission -- the U.S. premiere of "Friendly Persuasions," a song cycle for tenor by Jake Heggie (composer of opera's "Dead Man Walking") built on a great idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2004 | Adam Baer, Special to The Times
In 2000, when composer Jake Heggie enjoyed the big San Francisco premiere of his opera "Dead Man Walking," many critics balked. The drama, they asserted, was admirable, but the flat, derivatively tonal music was not. Heggie wrote decorative, meandering lines that safely borrowed from Strauss, Sondheim, Menotti and Bolcom. At the time, it seemed as if a powerful pod of Broadway composers had usurped our operatic waters. Heggie led the swim.
NEWS
April 18, 2002 | MARK SWED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Dead Man Walking," Jake Heggie's opera, has legs. A year after its premiere by the San Francisco Opera, it has now received a second production by Opera Pacific, and Tuesday night the company easily sold out the house for the first of five performances at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. A live recording from San Francisco has recently been released by Erato. Opera companies in the U.S. and abroad are lining up to mount either the original or this new production.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2000 | MARK SWED, Mark Swed is The Times' music critic
We Americans pride ourselves on being a direct, sensible people. We celebrate straight shooters, straight talkers, straight whiskey and straight stories. We like explanations, not ambiguity. We expect our day in court, clear and rational arguments, unbiased judgments, no loose ends. We are not, as is Italy, an operatic nation. Just compare the original American western with its spaghetti imitation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2000 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a frequent contributor to Calendar
A towering black grid of square and rectangular cubicles looms at the back of a rehearsal hall stage. It is meant to represent both physical and psychological space--prison cells as much as the interior of the mind--and its very size suggests the insurmountability of the human conflicts unfolding in its shadow. On stage in front of the massive structure, a group of men and women sing a scene fraught with pain and discord.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD
The fine art of songwriting, in the art song tradition, has been a practice paid ambivalent attention in our century. San Francisco-based pianist and composer Heggie has taken it upon himself to delve into the venerable songwriting tradition, often referring, stylistically, to romantic 19th century models and hints of smarter Broadway musical thinking, and now has well more than 100 pieces to show for the effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD
The fine art of songwriting, in the art song tradition, has been a practice paid ambivalent attention in our century. San Francisco-based pianist and composer Heggie has taken it upon himself to delve into the venerable songwriting tradition, often referring, stylistically, to romantic 19th century models and hints of smarter Broadway musical thinking, and now has well more than 100 pieces to show for the effort.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2004 | Adam Baer, Special to The Times
In 2000, when composer Jake Heggie enjoyed the big San Francisco premiere of his opera "Dead Man Walking," many critics balked. The drama, they asserted, was admirable, but the flat, derivatively tonal music was not. Heggie wrote decorative, meandering lines that safely borrowed from Strauss, Sondheim, Menotti and Bolcom. At the time, it seemed as if a powerful pod of Broadway composers had usurped our operatic waters. Heggie led the swim.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1999 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armistead Maupin created legions of fans with his "Tales of the City" stories, first serialized in the San Francisco Chronicle in the mid-'70s, then published in books and later broadcast over PBS and Showtime in two miniseries. People who wanted the stories to go on forever can find a little comfort when San Francisco composer Jake Heggie's "Anna Madrigal Remembers"--set to a new Maupin text--makes its Southern California premiere Saturday at the Irvine Barclay Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1996 | David Mermelstein, David Mermelstein writes about the arts for newspapers and magazines
Driving around this city with Jake Heggie, one can feel his barely contained enthusiasm. The 35-year-old composer is just starting to reap recognition's rewards, and he speaks animatedly and volubly about his newfound good fortune. Heggie, who works in the public relations department of the San Francisco Opera, is especially high on his adopted city, for it's here that he has found his voice.
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