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Jake Kasdan

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Lawrence Kasdan made his directorial debut in 1981 with the acclaimed film noir "Body Heat," his son Jake was just 6 years old. Now, 17 years later, Kasdan fils makes his big-screen directorial debut with the offbeat "Zero Effect," starring Bill Pullman, Ben Stiller and Ryan O'Neal. The Castle Rock release opens Friday. Kasdan, 23, also wrote and produced the comedy thriller, the story of Daryl Zero (Pullman), a brilliant private detective who barely functions in real life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Bad Teacher" is a classic underachiever. This subversive comedy definitely has its moments, but when the final grades are in, the raunchy romantic romp starring Cameron Diaz, Jason Segel, Justin Timberlake and Lucy Punch is a frustrating mix of smart flash and smirking impudence. It makes you want to dash off a "could have been great, if only they'd tried harder" note to the parents. The notion that director Jake Kasdan and screenwriters Gene Stupnitsky and Lee Eisenberg ("The Office" veterans)
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2011 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
"Bad Teacher" is a classic underachiever. This subversive comedy definitely has its moments, but when the final grades are in, the raunchy romantic romp starring Cameron Diaz, Jason Segel, Justin Timberlake and Lucy Punch is a frustrating mix of smart flash and smirking impudence. It makes you want to dash off a "could have been great, if only they'd tried harder" note to the parents. The notion that director Jake Kasdan and screenwriters Gene Stupnitsky and Lee Eisenberg ("The Office" veterans)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
After 17 years of winning over moviegoers with her mile-long legs, breezy confidence and wide, almost goofy smile, one of Hollywood's consummate charmers has had enough. Cut the charisma and cue the contempt: It's time, finally, to loathe Cameron Diaz. As an unrepentant moral scourge in her new film "Bad Teacher," Diaz plays Elizabeth Halsey — an educator who steals, cheats, lies, sleeps in class, smokes pot in the school parking lot and swears like a trucker, often in red pen remarks scrawled on the work of her middle-school students.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
After 17 years of winning over moviegoers with her mile-long legs, breezy confidence and wide, almost goofy smile, one of Hollywood's consummate charmers has had enough. Cut the charisma and cue the contempt: It's time, finally, to loathe Cameron Diaz. As an unrepentant moral scourge in her new film "Bad Teacher," Diaz plays Elizabeth Halsey — an educator who steals, cheats, lies, sleeps in class, smokes pot in the school parking lot and swears like a trucker, often in red pen remarks scrawled on the work of her middle-school students.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2006 | Rachel Abramowitz
You know you're at an industry screening when audience members tote copies of Bill Carter's "Desperate Executives" and cram diligently as they await the curtain rising for "The TV Set," Jake Kasdan's satire about the life of one television pilot during pilot season. Actually, they were probably TV wannabes (those mentioned in the book have no doubt already read it), but that still translates into a boisterous, and packed, house for the Los Angeles premiere of the film on Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
There is nothing wrong with "The TV Set." Do not attempt to adjust the picture. They are controlling transmission. If they wish to make it louder, they will bring up the volume. If they wish to make it softer, they will tune it to a whisper. They can reduce the focus to a soft blur, or sharpen it to crystal clarity. They will control the horizontal. They will control the vertical. For an hour and a half, sit quietly and they will control all that you see and hear.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2007 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
The several hundred extras are supposed to look as if they are enjoying a pretty good concert, but they don't really have to act: The music is that good. John C. Reilly is on the stage of downtown's Variety Arts Theater and he and his 1950s-era band are belting out a Roy Orbison-style love ballad called "A Life Without You." Dewey Cox, the charismatic singer Reilly plays in the film, has dedicated the song to his wife, and the lyrics and performance are emotionally convincing.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2008 | Michael Sragow, Baltimore Sun
Few big-studio movies that are lavishly promoted and favorably reviewed arrive dead on arrival at the box office. But "Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story," Judd Apatow and Jake Kasdan's volcanically funny spoof of musical biopics like "Coal Miner's Daughter" failed to attract audiences from its first showings a week ago. Could it be that audiences just don't want to see wiseacre moviemakers lampoon Very Important Movies? From "Airplane!"
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2007 | Randy Lewis
Loving pop parody is a joy when it works -- think the Rutles and Spinal Tap -- and an ordeal when it doesn't. Fortunately, it works much of the time in the stylistically chameleonic music for director Jake Kasdan's skewering of the rock biopic, thanks to some razor-edged songwriting by star John C. Reilly and a slew of collaborators, including Marshall Crenshaw, the film's co-writer, and producer-writer-director Judd Apatow, Dan Bern and Mike Viola.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2007 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
The several hundred extras are supposed to look as if they are enjoying a pretty good concert, but they don't really have to act: The music is that good. John C. Reilly is on the stage of downtown's Variety Arts Theater and he and his 1950s-era band are belting out a Roy Orbison-style love ballad called "A Life Without You." Dewey Cox, the charismatic singer Reilly plays in the film, has dedicated the song to his wife, and the lyrics and performance are emotionally convincing.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2007 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
There is nothing wrong with "The TV Set." Do not attempt to adjust the picture. They are controlling transmission. If they wish to make it louder, they will bring up the volume. If they wish to make it softer, they will tune it to a whisper. They can reduce the focus to a soft blur, or sharpen it to crystal clarity. They will control the horizontal. They will control the vertical. For an hour and a half, sit quietly and they will control all that you see and hear.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2006 | Rachel Abramowitz
You know you're at an industry screening when audience members tote copies of Bill Carter's "Desperate Executives" and cram diligently as they await the curtain rising for "The TV Set," Jake Kasdan's satire about the life of one television pilot during pilot season. Actually, they were probably TV wannabes (those mentioned in the book have no doubt already read it), but that still translates into a boisterous, and packed, house for the Los Angeles premiere of the film on Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Lawrence Kasdan made his directorial debut in 1981 with the acclaimed film noir "Body Heat," his son Jake was just 6 years old. Now, 17 years later, Kasdan fils makes his big-screen directorial debut with the offbeat "Zero Effect," starring Bill Pullman, Ben Stiller and Ryan O'Neal. The Castle Rock release opens Friday. Kasdan, 23, also wrote and produced the comedy thriller, the story of Daryl Zero (Pullman), a brilliant private detective who barely functions in real life.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2002 | Associated Press
Moviegoers weary of pre-Oscar seriousness escaped to "Orange County" over the weekend, but the teen comedy couldn't quite match the struggles of a hobbit and a mathematician at the box office. "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring" was in first place for the fourth weekend in a row, grossing $16.2 million and pushing its total take to $228.3 million, according to studio estimates Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2008 | Kevin Bronson
Angela Correa (pictured) could have given the world "Women's Participation in Urban Popular Movements in 1970s Mexico." Honorable and, no doubt, heady stuff, but having set aside that master's thesis to pursue songwriting, Correa later this year will instead release her debut album as Correatown, "Echoes," a less academic but decidedly heartfelt take on human interaction. "I always want to write the fun songs," she says, "but I always go back to real concerns and relationship issues."
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