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Jake Kilrain

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SPORTS
July 15, 1989
Earl Gustkey's story about the last bare-knuckle fight in history, between John L. Sullivan and Jake Kilrain, brought back memories. When we were kids playing on the sidewalk outside our house in Medford, Mass., a white-haired man with a cane used to walk slowly along and regularly stop and talk to us. Ten years later, when he died and there were big stories about him in the sports pages of the Boston papers, I was told the old man was Jake Kilrain. Incidentally, there was nothing surprising about Sullivan and Kilrain both hailing from the nearby suburbs of Dorchester and Somerville because Boston was the longtime center of American boxing before the main action shifted to New York in the early '30s.
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SPORTS
July 15, 1989
Earl Gustkey's story about the last bare-knuckle fight in history, between John L. Sullivan and Jake Kilrain, brought back memories. When we were kids playing on the sidewalk outside our house in Medford, Mass., a white-haired man with a cane used to walk slowly along and regularly stop and talk to us. Ten years later, when he died and there were big stories about him in the sports pages of the Boston papers, I was told the old man was Jake Kilrain. Incidentally, there was nothing surprising about Sullivan and Kilrain both hailing from the nearby suburbs of Dorchester and Somerville because Boston was the longtime center of American boxing before the main action shifted to New York in the early '30s.
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SPORTS
July 8, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
One hundred years ago today, in pre-dawn darkness, two trains pulled out of New Orleans in secrecy. They rolled north, across the Pontchartrain Bridge, toward Mississippi. Several thousand men were onboard in such cramped quarters that some clung to the tops of the cars. The passengers' tickets read only: "Destination and Return." The trains rolled through the night. At the Mississippi state line, an armed party of 25 Mississippi state militiamen ordered the first train to stop.
SPORTS
July 8, 1989 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
One hundred years ago today, in pre-dawn darkness, two trains pulled out of New Orleans in secrecy. They rolled north, across the Pontchartrain Bridge, toward Mississippi. Several thousand men were onboard in such cramped quarters that some clung to the tops of the cars. The passengers' tickets read only: "Destination and Return." The trains rolled through the night. At the Mississippi state line, an armed party of 25 Mississippi state militiamen ordered the first train to stop.
SPORTS
July 8, 1999 | SHAV GLICK
Baseball's All-Star game has often been criticized for ballot-box stuffing, but Chris Nandor of Boston has taken it to a new level. When Nandor heard last month that Red Sox shortstop Nomar Garciaparra was 20,000 votes behind the New York Yankees' Derek Jeter in the American League voting, he took advantage of the newest way of voting--via the Internet. Nandor cast about 25,000 votes for Garciaparra.
SPORTS
June 16, 1990 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mike Tyson entered the ring in a domed baseball stadium in Tokyo Feb. 11, he was two victories from acknowledgment, by at least some boxing scholars, as the greatest of the 19th and 20th Century heavyweights. At 23, he was 37-0 with 33 knockouts, steamrolling his way toward Rocky Marciano's heavyweight record of 49-0. All he had to do was knock over a hopeless longshot named Buster Douglas, and he would set up the big fight against Evander Holyfield.
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