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Jakob Nielsen

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BUSINESS
April 13, 1998 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jakob Nielsen's official title at Sun Microsystems is "distinguished" engineer. But "supreme guru" better describes what he actually does at the Silicon Valley computer company, he says. A native of Denmark, Nielsen worked at the advanced research laboratories of IBM and Bellcore before coming to Sun four years ago to help design easier-to-use computers. With the emergence of the Web, Nielsen was put in charge of designing Sun's Web site.
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BUSINESS
April 13, 1998 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jakob Nielsen's official title at Sun Microsystems is "distinguished" engineer. But "supreme guru" better describes what he actually does at the Silicon Valley computer company, he says. A native of Denmark, Nielsen worked at the advanced research laboratories of IBM and Bellcore before coming to Sun four years ago to help design easier-to-use computers. With the emergence of the Web, Nielsen was put in charge of designing Sun's Web site.
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NEWS
September 1, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
After seven months of remaking 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. to their liking, President Bush and First Lady Laura Bush on Friday unveiled the overhaul of another tony address: the White House Internet site. For months, after Bush jettisoned thousands of documents that former President Clinton had placed on the site, the White House home page had been little more than a place holder on the information superhighway.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2001 | DAVE WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The flashing "12:00" on videocassette recorders represents everything wrong with modern technology. But help may be on the way with better equipment that automatically sets VCR clocks en masse. The half-million-dollar program sponsored by the Consumer Electronics Assn. would replace outdated gear at public television stations nationwide designed to automatically set the clock on VCRs by sending out a time stamp over the air or through cable.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1999 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stung by criticism that search engines have fallen hopelessly behind in indexing the 800 million pages of the World Wide Web, several search companies have launched themselves on a Herculean effort to scan and review the entire expanse of cyberspace. Excite@Home, which operates Excite, the third-most popular search engine, Monday announced plans to look at the Web's entirety using a new technology that will be deployed in the next few weeks.
NEWS
June 3, 2001 | MATTHEW FORDAHL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
How do people find what they're looking for on the World Wide Web? Most simply follow the call of the wild. The same theories that describe how animals behave while sniffing for prey can also predict how people ferret out information in the jungle of cyberspace, researchers say. Foraging theories, developed by ecologists decades ago, are now being applied to Internet usage in an attempt to understand how Web sites can be made more intuitive and less like a maze.
NEWS
January 24, 2002 | Dave Wilson
Marina Dundjerski, a writer who lives in Los Angeles, bought her own Internet domain name, just like millions of other Americans. She also got, at no extra charge, a big scare. A domain name, latimes.com, for instance, is the stuff to the right of the @ sign in an e-mail address. When Dundjerski set up her domain in 2000, she paid a fee good for two years. When the name came up for renewal this month, she went to the Web site of the company that manages her domain-name registration and made a discovery that left her terrified.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Controlling a computer has been largely defined over the years by the humble keyboard and mouse. Now, researchers are turning their attention to new kinds of controllers, including eye movements, voice commands and even brain waves. "One of the questions we in the industry struggle with every day is how we can make computers easier to use," said Tim Bajarin, president of Creative Strategies Inc., a consulting firm in Silicon Valley. "Not everybody is keyboard-centric.
BUSINESS
September 29, 1997 | STEVE G. STEINBERG
While explaining to an investor why Buzznet, one of the early commercial Web sites, was a financial black hole, co-founder Tara Lemmey drew a quick diagram. On the left were hundreds of specialized Web sites, on the right was a fragmented viewership, and on top were the advertisers struggling to reach a mass audience. There is no way, Lemmey says, for advertisers to reach the audience they want without advertising on many different sites.
NEWS
October 3, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
The Food Police have stormed Denmark, where it is now a little more expensive to eat fattening food. The country's so-called “fat tax” went into effect on Saturday. The tax rate is 16 Danish kroner per kilogram of saturated fat in a food - in terms Americans can understand, that's about $1.29 per pound of saturated fat - and it kicks in when the saturated fat content of a food item exceeds 2.3%. For the Record, 1:37 p.m. Oct. 4: An earlier version of this online article incorrectly said that Danes pay the equivalent of $6.27 per pound of saturated fat in their food when saturated fat exceeds 2.3%.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1998 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Several years ago Donald Dabdub, a UC Irvine atmospheric scientist, developed a powerful computer model to study smog in the Los Angeles Basin. His only problem: The simulation took eight days to run on his engineering computer and he didn't have several hundred thousand dollars to buy a supercomputer. So one day last October, Dabdub found himself ripping open boxes of cheap personal computers.
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