Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJal
IN THE NEWS

Jal

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | FRED BAYLES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It would seem to be the model of a Japanese flight school. Young, uniformed cadets study with quiet earnestness in classrooms with posters of samurai and geishas exhorting diligence. Instructors are greeted with bows; students stand at attention on the flight line to show respect when one of their own takes off. But although the student body is entirely Japanese, the school is American. Run by a U.S. firm called IASCO, this academy in the heart of California's wine country prepares pilots for 30-year flying careers with Japan Air Lines.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 29, 2001 | Associated Press
Japan Airlines will suspend nonstop flights from Tokyo to Las Vegas effective Thursday because of weak travel demand following last month's terrorist attacks. "JAL likes this route, it's eager to hold on to this route, so we're optimistic about the future," Irene Jackson, spokeswoman for the airline in New York, said. Jackson said there were hopes the flights would only be suspended until Feb. 1.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 18, 1987
Dozens of police investigators searched two Tokyo offices of Japan Air Lines for evidence of criminal negligence in the 1985 crash of a jumbo jet that killed 520 people in the worst single-plane accident in history. Investigators, in the first such search since the crash northwest of Tokyo, sought evidence that might support criminal charges against the airline and its personnel.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1999 | Associated Press
Coffee, tea or cigarette substitute? Beginning today, Tokyo-based Japan Airlines will ban smoking on all international flights--but it will offer passengers an alternative. Those who find smoke-free flying troublesome will receive a little plastic tube in the shape of a cigarette to put in their mouths to help suppress the urge. "It's for oral gratification," airline spokeswoman Irene Jackson said.
NEWS
January 4, 1987
The inquiry into the reported sighting of an unidentified flying object over Alaska was reopened. Federal Aviation Aministration investigators were reinterviewing the pilot of a Japan Air Lines cargo flight, Capt. Kenju Terauchi, and reviewing records from Nov. 17, when a mysterious blip appeared on radar screens and the JAL crew said they saw strange lights in their flight path. After evasive action recommended by the FAA was taken, the lights reportedly followed the plane for about 400 miles.
NEWS
August 17, 1985 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Amid growing concern that the crash of a Japan Air Lines 747 earlier this week might have been caused by a structural failure, Boeing Co. has issued a "service advisory" to all Boeing 747 operators, saying they "may wish to inspect" tail sections of the planes, company spokesmen said Friday. The special inspection follows by one day a mandatory order, issued by Japan's Transportation Ministry to the nation's four airlines, calling for detailed inspections of Boeing 747 tail sections.
BUSINESS
April 4, 1986 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
When All Nippon Airways, the world's sixth-largest airline in number of passengers, opens routes to Los Angeles and Washington in July--becoming Japan's second transpacific carrier--it intends to avoid stepping on the toes of Japan Air Lines. ANA President Taizo Nakamura, calling JAL his company's "elder brother," indicated that U.S. airlines will be ANA's principal competitive targets, especially on the Tokyo-Washington route.
NEWS
August 15, 1985 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN and RICHARD E. MEYER, Times Staff Writers
Boeing Co. began advising airlines in 1983 to increase inspections for structural cracks in their aircraft fleets, including 747s, as a result of concern that potentially dangerous airframe deterioration could go undetected. The special inspections were required by the Federal Aviation Administration after an exhaustive analysis of a 1977 crash--in which a Boeing 707 jet came apart in the air--revealed that traditional inspection techniques were not capable of ensuring the integrity of aircraft.
SPORTS
February 22, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
To: Emperor Akihito. Date: 22 Feb 1998 (22 Ni-gatsu '98) Copy: Empress Michiko, Crown Prince Naruhito, Prince Akishino and Princess Sayako. From: An Ashamed U.S. Citizen. Re: Village Idiots. Your Majesty: On behalf of my people, I beg your pardon for our ice hockey hooligans' shenanigans. Your forgiveness, your highness, I do not beg. We have a woman in Washington, D.C., name of Janet Reno. Have your people call her people. Apprehend these criminals.
TRAVEL
May 18, 1986 | HORACE SUTTON, Sutton is editor of Signature magazine.
Traveling to the Orient Japanese-style can be a schizoid experience, an encounter with two worlds both stuffed into an American-made capsule flying 35,000 feet across the top of the world. I waited in the lounge of JFK in New York where the offerings were picked pretty clean by the time I got there, but there was enough in the trays to distinguish two cultures side by side.
SPORTS
February 22, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
To: Emperor Akihito. Date: 22 Feb 1998 (22 Ni-gatsu '98) Copy: Empress Michiko, Crown Prince Naruhito, Prince Akishino and Princess Sayako. From: An Ashamed U.S. Citizen. Re: Village Idiots. Your Majesty: On behalf of my people, I beg your pardon for our ice hockey hooligans' shenanigans. Your forgiveness, your highness, I do not beg. We have a woman in Washington, D.C., name of Janet Reno. Have your people call her people. Apprehend these criminals.
BUSINESS
May 8, 1996 | From Associated Press
Forget the smoked salmon and the complimentary champagne. Japan Airlines is planning something really special for its first-class passengers: a $95,000 luxury bathroom. Japan's largest international carrier announced Tuesday that selected first-class cabins on its route between Tokyo and New York will soon be outfitted with lavatories on a grand scale. "Especially on long-distance flights, the toilet is something that leaves a deep impression," JAL spokesman Yoshihiko Kozu said.
BUSINESS
May 1, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
UAL Corp. Chairman Gerald Greenwald told a congressional committee Tuesday that Japan's attempts to limit the flights of U.S. carriers poses a "political and economic threat" to the United States. Japan is placing sanctions on a United Airlines flight from Los Angeles to Narita, Japan, beginning today, Greenwald said. He said the flight was "taken hostage" by the Japanese in retaliation for failure of U.S. officials to approve Japan Airlines service between Tokyo and Kona, Hawaii.
NEWS
September 17, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Japan Air Lines' plan to start hiring contract flight attendants at half the pay of full-status employees has stirred a new controversy here over government intervention in private business. The battle--unusual only in that it has gone public--is not over yet. But signs are pointing to a victory for business. It started in August, just as JAL was about to interview applicants for jobs as contract flight attendants.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.S.-Japan dispute over air service rights is heating up as Tokyo seeks changes in what it views as an unfair 1952 agreement and American carriers try to expand Pacific Rim services under the old rules. The latest point of friction comes from a Japan Airlines request to inaugurate a route between the northern city of Sendai and Honolulu beginning last Thursday. The U.S.
NEWS
June 27, 1993 | FRED BAYLES, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It would seem to be the model of a Japanese flight school. Young, uniformed cadets study with quiet earnestness in classrooms with posters of samurai and geishas exhorting diligence. Instructors are greeted with bows; students stand at attention on the flight line to show respect when one of their own takes off. But although the student body is entirely Japanese, the school is American. Run by a U.S. firm called IASCO, this academy in the heart of California's wine country prepares pilots for 30-year flying careers with Japan Air Lines.
NEWS
August 20, 1985 | Associated Press
A woman who survived the Japan Air Lines crash in which 520 people perished said her 8-year-old daughter shouted at her, urging her to stay awake and live through the long night in the wreckage. Hiroko Yoshizaki, 35, said that after the crash she was on the edge of consciousness because of pain when her daughter, Mikiko, shouted: "Don't go to sleep mother! Stay awake or you'll die! I'm hungry, mother!"
BUSINESS
August 22, 1986 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
To Junji Ito, Japan Air Lines has been managed like a firm that has had "36 presidents in the last 30 years." Many have criticized Japan's flag carrier since Aug. 12, 1985, when one of its Boeing 747 jetliners crashed on a Tokyo-Osaka flight, killing all but four of the 524 people aboard. But Ito is more than an ordinary critic. He is the new chairman of JAL, brought in with the personal backing of Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone to clean house.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1990 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan Air Lines, which already owns more Boeing 747s than any other airline in the world, Thursday placed firm orders for 20 of the latest 747-400s and took options on 34 more in a transaction that could ultimately be worth $9.34 billion. If all of the options are exercised, the last of the planes would delivered in 1999. JAL has already taken delivery of five 747-400s and is awaiting delivery of 15 others from an earlier order. The orders will give an important boost to the U.S.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1990 | From Associated Press
Japan Airlines Co., Japan's largest airline and Boeing Co.'s biggest customer, said today it has ordered 20 Boeing 747-400 jetliners and taken options to buy 34 more. The deal would total nearly $12 billion if all the options are exercised, said JAL spokesman Sumitaka Kawamura. The new order brings to 74 the number of orders and options JAL has placed for Boeing's largest jumbo jet.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|