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Jalal Talabani

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WORLD
April 7, 2005 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Iraq's new democratically elected National Assembly named a former Kurdish resistance leader as the nation's president Wednesday, a historic event broadcast nationwide and watched even by deposed President Saddam Hussein in his Baghdad jail cell. Jalal Talabani, leader of Patriotic Union of Kurdistan and a longtime bete noire of Hussein, accepted the largely ceremonial post and urged his countrymen to end sectarian and ethnic divisions.
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WORLD
March 5, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Caesar Ahmed
The party machine of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan is pulling out all the stops. On-duty security forces string up PUK banners, and young men break curfew to hang out of cars waving ivy-colored pennants. The streets of Sulaymaniya are a sea of green. But in the final days before Iraqis vote for a new national parliament, flags of another color are grabbing all the attention. They're blue, and emblazoned with a burning candle and one word: Change. The PUK, the longtime ruling party of Sulaymaniya, in northern Iraq's Kurdistan enclave, is in a fight for its life against the upstart Change movement.
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WORLD
September 8, 2005 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
Iraq's equivalent of the West Wing was abuzz Wednesday as President Jalal Talabani and his staff raced to finalize details of his high-profile trip to Washington to shore up U.S. support for the war in Iraq. But there were a few glitches. Rats had gnawed away the TV antenna cables in Talabani's "war room," leaving just one of the four sets working and curtailing his media team's access to the outside world.
WORLD
January 22, 2010 | By Liz Sly
Iraq's president has asked the country's Supreme Court to rule on the legality of a ban on hundreds of candidates in the upcoming elections, offering the first official challenge to a decision that could undermine the legitimacy of the poll. President Jalal Talabani said Thursday that he was "personally not happy" with the ban on mostly secular candidates, and questioned the authority of the committee that ordered it because its composition had not been approved by the parliament.
WORLD
February 28, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Iraqi President Jalal Talabani remained hospitalized here Tuesday after a collapse during the weekend, but he was said to be recovering well. "He's in good shape, fully aware and doing well," said Saad Hayyani, Iraq's ambassador to Jordan. Talabani was recuperating from exhaustion and lung inflammation, his personal physician and other officials said Monday. The physician, Yedkar Hikmat, said rumors about a heart problem were "categorically wrong."
WORLD
September 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
The leaders of the two main Kurdish factions that control northern Iraq have signed a reconciliation agreement as the United States tries to forge a united front against Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein. The two Kurdish factions run an autonomous enclave in northern Iraq and can mobilize tens of thousands of fighters, but they have been deeply divided. Jalal Talabani, leader of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, or PUK, and Massoud Barzani, head of the Kurdistan Democratic Party, or KDP, met over the weekend in the Iraqi Kurdish city of Irbil to confer on resolving their differences.
WORLD
September 10, 2005 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Iraq's president said Friday that U.S. forces might not be needed in his country two years from now. President Jalal Talabani said he believed Iraqi forces would be able to gradually assume more responsibility for protecting the main cities and roads, while the number of U.S. troops would be scaled back. If those plans can be implemented, "within two years there will be no need for U.S. forces," he told an audience at the Brookings Institution's Saban Center for Middle East Policy.
WORLD
December 11, 2006 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
Iraq's president lashed out at the Iraq Study Group report Sunday, saying it undermines his nation's sovereignty and constitution and "works against Iraq's long struggle against dictatorship." President Jalal Talabani, head of state for two consecutive Iraqi governments and a longtime U.S. ally, accused the bipartisan U.S. commission of condescension and ignorance. "They are dealing with us as if we are an emerging colony, doing whatever they like," Talabani said.
NEWS
June 11, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Iraqi Kurdish leader Jalal Talabani called Monday for the United States to put pressure on Baghdad to drop major obstacles that he said are blocking progress in talks for a new autonomy agreement for Iraqi Kurdistan. Talabani, leader of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, also appealed for U.S.-led allied troops to stay on in the security zone they created in northern Iraq in April until final agreement is reached with Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-level Kurdish delegation has begun face-to-face political talks in Baghdad with the Saddam Hussein regime on an end to the rebellion in Iraq, Kurdish officials disclosed Saturday. The surprise development came at the initiative of the beleaguered Baghdad regime, the Kurdish officials said, and marked another rapid turn in the post-Gulf War situation in Iraq, from armed rebellion to a desperate flight of refugees and, now, attempts for a political solution.
WORLD
March 15, 2009 | Reuters
Iraqi President Jalal Talabani is not likely to seek another term when his mandate expires at the end of this year, a senior official of his party said Saturday. But Talabani, 75, who underwent heart surgery last year in the United States, will remain head of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan party, said Fuad Masoum, head of the Kurdish alliance and a member of parliament. "It doesn't mean he will give up his political life. It just means he will not go for the presidential post," Masoum said.
WORLD
February 28, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Iraqi President Jalal Talabani remained hospitalized here Tuesday after a collapse during the weekend, but he was said to be recovering well. "He's in good shape, fully aware and doing well," said Saad Hayyani, Iraq's ambassador to Jordan. Talabani was recuperating from exhaustion and lung inflammation, his personal physician and other officials said Monday. The physician, Yedkar Hikmat, said rumors about a heart problem were "categorically wrong."
WORLD
December 11, 2006 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
Iraq's president lashed out at the Iraq Study Group report Sunday, saying it undermines his nation's sovereignty and constitution and "works against Iraq's long struggle against dictatorship." President Jalal Talabani, head of state for two consecutive Iraqi governments and a longtime U.S. ally, accused the bipartisan U.S. commission of condescension and ignorance. "They are dealing with us as if we are an emerging colony, doing whatever they like," Talabani said.
WORLD
May 11, 2006 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
The city morgue here received 1,091 homicide victims in April, most of them the result of sectarian killings that have become "no less dangerous than terrorism," Iraq's president said Wednesday. "These daily crimes will create an environment of mutual suspicion between the nation's sons and destabilize our national unity," President Jalal Talabani warned in a statement issued by his office. Each victim leaves behind "an orphan, weeping mother, a suffering father or a suffering wife," he said.
WORLD
September 10, 2005 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
Iraq's president said Friday that U.S. forces might not be needed in his country two years from now. President Jalal Talabani said he believed Iraqi forces would be able to gradually assume more responsibility for protecting the main cities and roads, while the number of U.S. troops would be scaled back. If those plans can be implemented, "within two years there will be no need for U.S. forces," he told an audience at the Brookings Institution's Saban Center for Middle East Policy.
WORLD
September 8, 2005 | Borzou Daragahi, Times Staff Writer
Iraq's equivalent of the West Wing was abuzz Wednesday as President Jalal Talabani and his staff raced to finalize details of his high-profile trip to Washington to shore up U.S. support for the war in Iraq. But there were a few glitches. Rats had gnawed away the TV antenna cables in Talabani's "war room," leaving just one of the four sets working and curtailing his media team's access to the outside world.
WORLD
March 5, 2010 | By Ned Parker and Caesar Ahmed
The party machine of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan is pulling out all the stops. On-duty security forces string up PUK banners, and young men break curfew to hang out of cars waving ivy-colored pennants. The streets of Sulaymaniya are a sea of green. But in the final days before Iraqis vote for a new national parliament, flags of another color are grabbing all the attention. They're blue, and emblazoned with a burning candle and one word: Change. The PUK, the longtime ruling party of Sulaymaniya, in northern Iraq's Kurdistan enclave, is in a fight for its life against the upstart Change movement.
NEWS
April 25, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kurdish leader Jalal Talabani, after a face-to-face meeting with President Saddam Hussein, declared in Baghdad on Wednesday that they have struck a deal for peace in northern Iraq. The Kurds will abandon their shattered revolt in exchange for promises of political autonomy and democratic reform, said Talabani, leader of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, one of the major Kurdish opposition groups. "The agreement affirms the principle of democracy in Iraq, press freedoms and . . .
WORLD
April 7, 2005 | Edmund Sanders, Times Staff Writer
Iraq's new democratically elected National Assembly named a former Kurdish resistance leader as the nation's president Wednesday, a historic event broadcast nationwide and watched even by deposed President Saddam Hussein in his Baghdad jail cell. Jalal Talabani, leader of Patriotic Union of Kurdistan and a longtime bete noire of Hussein, accepted the largely ceremonial post and urged his countrymen to end sectarian and ethnic divisions.
WORLD
September 10, 2002 | From Associated Press
The leaders of the two main Kurdish factions that control northern Iraq have signed a reconciliation agreement as the United States tries to forge a united front against Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein. The two Kurdish factions run an autonomous enclave in northern Iraq and can mobilize tens of thousands of fighters, but they have been deeply divided. Jalal Talabani, leader of the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan, or PUK, and Massoud Barzani, head of the Kurdistan Democratic Party, or KDP, met over the weekend in the Iraqi Kurdish city of Irbil to confer on resolving their differences.
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