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HEALTH
April 27, 1998 | SHARI ROAN
Almost every week, significant advances in medicine are reported in the pages of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. This week, the journal will begin to make that information more accessible to consumers. JAMA has launched a "patient page," which will appear each week and will be written for the layperson, distilling the major study or report featured in each issue. For example, the April 22-29 issue of JAMA contains several articles on stroke.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
August 27, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
MOGADISHU, Somalia - In the years to come, Ahmed Jama will be seen either as a visionary or a lunatic who squandered his money on a crazy dream. That crazy dream? To bring tourists to his hotel on the shores of one of the world's prettiest beaches - which just happens to be on the edge of a city known for more than 20 years as the world's most dangerous place. Mogadishu. In his dream, there won't be half a dozen guards with guns on the back of an SUV for most foreign visitors, like now. And the haunting memories of ruthless warlords, crippling famine and terrifying armed children will have faded.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1999
Not to interfere in a remarkable local exchange between two formidable adversaries but for now the balance must go to Bruce Roland, whose article, "Beware the Truth About the Facts" (Ventura County Perspective, June 6), admonished readers to be careful of what they read. In response, Kenneth Long ("Skepticism and Facts," Ventura County letters, June 13) came to the defense of Stanton Glantz by citing the comment of the editor of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. (JAMA) that Glantz's research is "impeccable."
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Diet researchers reported Tuesday that patients who had recently lost weight seemed to burn calories more efficiently in the crucial weight-maintenance phase when they ate a low-carbohydrate, Atkins-style diet than they did when they ate a traditional, higher-carblow-fat diet.  The small but intensive study, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , showed through various measurements of energy expenditure that patients burned about 300 more calories a day on a low-carb diet than they did on thelow-fat diet.
WORLD
August 27, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
MOGADISHU, Somalia - In the years to come, Ahmed Jama will be seen either as a visionary or a lunatic who squandered his money on a crazy dream. That crazy dream? To bring tourists to his hotel on the shores of one of the world's prettiest beaches - which just happens to be on the edge of a city known for more than 20 years as the world's most dangerous place. Mogadishu. In his dream, there won't be half a dozen guards with guns on the back of an SUV for most foreign visitors, like now. And the haunting memories of ruthless warlords, crippling famine and terrifying armed children will have faded.
NEWS
February 23, 2011 | Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
A study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. found evidence that cellphones’ electromagnetic energy prompts unusual levels of activity in a user’s brain, raising concern that our national habit of jabbering into our 300 million cellphones might not be completely innocuous. But wait. Haven’t we been told that stimulating our brains with intellectual challenges, new experiences and copious social interaction is good for us? Why the ominous tone?
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Heart attack patients in the U.S. are more likely to be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days than patients in other countries, according to an analysis in JAMA released Tuesday. It may be because American patients spend fewer days in the hospital post-heart attack than patients in other countries, the study's authors wrote. Duke University cardiologist Dr. Robb D. Kociol led a team that studied data from a clinical trial that assessed the effectiveness of the drug pexelizumab in preventing death in the 30 days following a heart attack.  The trial, which was conducted between 2004 and 2006, enrolled more than 5,700 patients at nearly 300 sites in 17 countries, including the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and 13 nations in Europe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dalayad Haji Hashi Jama, former first lady of Somalia, died Monday of complications of diabetes, family members said. She was 72. Jama was married to former Somali dictator Mohamed Siad Barre for 45 years. After he died in exile in Lagos, Nigeria, in 1995, she joined eight of her children in Columbus, Ohio, which has the second-largest Somali population in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1985 | ROBERT HILBURN, Times Pop Music Critic
Boo! That was the reaction of lots of people around me at the end of the "30th Anniversary Rock 'n' Roll All Star Jam" on Friday night at the Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre. Chuck Berry may only be six years from the traditional retirement age of 65, but wouldn't you still expect him to sing more than two songs in a show that he headlines?
HEALTH
March 26, 2001 | LINDA MARSA, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
In nearly 20 years as editor of the Journal of the American Medical Assn., Dr. George D. Lundberg transformed what was once a house organ into one of the world's most influential medical journals. During his lengthy tenure, Lundberg wasn't afraid to tackle such highly charged issues as abortion, assisted suicide and alternative medicine. He was fired by the AMA in 1999 after he published the results of a controversial sex survey during former President Clinton's impeachment hearings.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Heart attack patients in the U.S. are more likely to be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days than patients in other countries, according to an analysis in JAMA released Tuesday. It may be because American patients spend fewer days in the hospital post-heart attack than patients in other countries, the study's authors wrote. Duke University cardiologist Dr. Robb D. Kociol led a team that studied data from a clinical trial that assessed the effectiveness of the drug pexelizumab in preventing death in the 30 days following a heart attack.  The trial, which was conducted between 2004 and 2006, enrolled more than 5,700 patients at nearly 300 sites in 17 countries, including the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and 13 nations in Europe.
NEWS
February 23, 2011 | Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
A study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. found evidence that cellphones’ electromagnetic energy prompts unusual levels of activity in a user’s brain, raising concern that our national habit of jabbering into our 300 million cellphones might not be completely innocuous. But wait. Haven’t we been told that stimulating our brains with intellectual challenges, new experiences and copious social interaction is good for us? Why the ominous tone?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Dalayad Haji Hashi Jama, former first lady of Somalia, died Monday of complications of diabetes, family members said. She was 72. Jama was married to former Somali dictator Mohamed Siad Barre for 45 years. After he died in exile in Lagos, Nigeria, in 1995, she joined eight of her children in Columbus, Ohio, which has the second-largest Somali population in the United States.
SCIENCE
April 23, 2003 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
In a highly unusual action, the Journal of the American Medical Assn. is publishing incomplete results today from an aborted drug trial, along with a scathing editorial blasting the drug's manufacturer for halting the trial. The massive trial enrolled 16,602 patients in 15 countries in a five-year effort to determine whether the anti-hypertension drug verapamil is better than less expensive diuretics and other drugs. But Pharmacia Corp.
HEALTH
March 26, 2001 | LINDA MARSA, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
In nearly 20 years as editor of the Journal of the American Medical Assn., Dr. George D. Lundberg transformed what was once a house organ into one of the world's most influential medical journals. During his lengthy tenure, Lundberg wasn't afraid to tackle such highly charged issues as abortion, assisted suicide and alternative medicine. He was fired by the AMA in 1999 after he published the results of a controversial sex survey during former President Clinton's impeachment hearings.
HEALTH
January 29, 2001 | JANE E. ALLEN
Most of the 100 essays in this volume give doctors the chance to express their humanity. In short and very personal pieces, they air feelings they usually stifle, such as frustration in seeing a child in pain, grief in losing a patient, guilt at not being able to do more, powerlessness in facing their own mortality. The remaining essays are reflections from other health-care workers--and a few patients.
NEWS
June 28, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Diet researchers reported Tuesday that patients who had recently lost weight seemed to burn calories more efficiently in the crucial weight-maintenance phase when they ate a low-carbohydrate, Atkins-style diet than they did when they ate a traditional, higher-carblow-fat diet.  The small but intensive study, which was published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. , showed through various measurements of energy expenditure that patients burned about 300 more calories a day on a low-carb diet than they did on thelow-fat diet.
HEALTH
December 18, 2000 | BENEDICT CAREY, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Medical news now flies so quickly from the laboratory to our laptops and newspapers that one prestigious medical journal has decided it's time to apply the brakes. In an editorial published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. (JAMA), the journal warned authors who submit papers not to talk to reporters about their work in any detail before it's published. The editorial, co-authored by Dr.
HEALTH
December 18, 2000 | BENEDICT CAREY, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Medical news now flies so quickly from the laboratory to our laptops and newspapers that one prestigious medical journal has decided it's time to apply the brakes. In an editorial published last week in the Journal of the American Medical Assn. (JAMA), the journal warned authors who submit papers not to talk to reporters about their work in any detail before it's published. The editorial, co-authored by Dr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1999
Not to interfere in a remarkable local exchange between two formidable adversaries but for now the balance must go to Bruce Roland, whose article, "Beware the Truth About the Facts" (Ventura County Perspective, June 6), admonished readers to be careful of what they read. In response, Kenneth Long ("Skepticism and Facts," Ventura County letters, June 13) came to the defense of Stanton Glantz by citing the comment of the editor of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. (JAMA) that Glantz's research is "impeccable."
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