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June 24, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"When I was young," says Jamaican deejay U-Roy, "I didn't think I would ever live in the United States." When asked just how he came from the Kingston ghetto of his youth to an apartment complex in Santa Ana, he is a little hazy on the details. He has some music business friends in Los Angeles and, well, he just kind of settled in about five years ago. He does his best to simulate some of the comforts of home. Every morning, for instance, he drives to Newport Beach to shop for fresh fish.
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May 13, 2001 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the three years since Makonnen Blake Hannah was named a government technology consultant, he's been to Harvard twice, NASA's Kennedy Space Center once and is now networking daily with some of the brightest young minds in the United States. Back home, he has delivered speeches, dedicated new high-tech projects and, every month, sent his boss a detailed report on everything from the hottest new computer games to instructions on building intranets in the nation's schools.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN, Don Snowden is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
Matt Robinson went to New York in 1982 to attend college, but he may have had his most educational experience on a Brooklyn street corner. "When I would visit friends in Brooklyn, I'd see one guy on the corner of Flatbush and Hawthorne with his (boom) box playing whoever was the cool hip-hop thing," said Robinson, 30, now an independent record producer who founded the underground dance club Funky Reggae when he returned to L.A. in 1986.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1994 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"When I was young," says Jamaican deejay U-Roy, "I didn't think I would ever live in the United States." When asked just how he came from the Kingston ghetto of his youth to an apartment complex in Santa Ana, he is a little hazy on the details. He has some music business friends in Los Angeles and, well, he just kind of settled in about five years ago. He does his best to simulate some of the comforts of home. Every morning, for instance, he drives to Newport Beach to shop for fresh fish.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the three years since Makonnen Blake Hannah was named a government technology consultant, he's been to Harvard twice, NASA's Kennedy Space Center once and is now networking daily with some of the brightest young minds in the United States. Back home, he has delivered speeches, dedicated new high-tech projects and, every month, sent his boss a detailed report on everything from the hottest new computer games to instructions on building intranets in the nation's schools.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1987 | JANE LIEBERMAN
What's your favorite rock film? The Times asked that question of five prominent figures from the film and rock worlds: Allan Arkush, director of the movie "Rock 'n' Roll High School"; Stephanie Bennett, producer of "The Compleat Beatles" documentary and the recent film "Chuck Berry: Hail, Hail Rock 'n' Roll"; Bill Graham, concert producer; D. A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1991 | KIRSTEN LEE SWARTZ
The class begins like any other, with the instructor admonishing his students for tardiness and encouraging quiet and order for his lecture. But move past the introduction, and John Baker's course turns toward the supernatural. He brings out the blindfolds, the incense and the chanting drummers. "We're not learning spells or sacrificing babies," said Baker, an instructor who wears his hair to his shoulders and dresses casually for his course on witchcraft at Moorpark College.
NEWS
May 11, 2001 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was before dawn when an elite squad from one of the deadliest police forces on Earth quietly passed the flower boxes, trimmed lawns and sleeping roosters on Fifth Seal Way and approached the ramshackle concrete house where seven young men would die. The police later would call it a shootout with street thugs who had killed a school principal and a cop: Justice had been done.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN, Don Snowden is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
Matt Robinson went to New York in 1982 to attend college, but he may have had his most educational experience on a Brooklyn street corner. "When I would visit friends in Brooklyn, I'd see one guy on the corner of Flatbush and Hawthorne with his (boom) box playing whoever was the cool hip-hop thing," said Robinson, 30, now an independent record producer who founded the underground dance club Funky Reggae when he returned to L.A. in 1986.
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