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NEWS
February 6, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
This Caribbean nation will decisively set aside eight years of Ronald Reagan-style pro-business government this week and veer to the left, according to an authoritative poll published Sunday, ending a short election campaign that has been surprising for its lack of passion and ideology.
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NEWS
February 11, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister-designate Michael Manley, an America-bashing socialist firebrand in the 1970s but now a moderate social democrat, set good relations with Washington as his first priority Friday and vowed that economically troubled Jamaica will honor its $4-billion foreign debt.
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NEWS
February 11, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister-designate Michael Manley, an America-bashing socialist firebrand in the 1970s but now a moderate social democrat, set good relations with Washington as his first priority Friday and vowed that economically troubled Jamaica will honor its $4-billion foreign debt.
NEWS
February 6, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
This Caribbean nation will decisively set aside eight years of Ronald Reagan-style pro-business government this week and veer to the left, according to an authoritative poll published Sunday, ending a short election campaign that has been surprising for its lack of passion and ideology.
NEWS
January 16, 1989
Jamaican Prime Minister Edward Seaga, the Reagan Administration's closest ally in the Caribbean, announced a parliamentary election for Feb. 9. Seaga, 58, who is seeking an unprecedented third consecutive four-year term, criticized his main rival, Socialist opposition leader Michael Manley. Seaga, at a Kingston rally, berated Manley's record and took credit for restoring political stability, economic recovery and international relations.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2000 | MATTHEW J. ROSENBERG, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nestled on the grounds of an 18th century plantation, Walkerswood Caribbean Foods is an unlikely success story--and a beacon of hope. Over two decades the company has grown from a tiny workers cooperative into an exporter by getting tourists hooked on Jamaican "jerk" sauces that turn ordinary chicken, pork and fish into tangy delights. The sauces--and other local delicacies from canned ackee fruit to allspice seasoning--are available as far afield as Toronto and Johannesburg, South Africa.
TRAVEL
February 18, 1990 | BEVERLY BEYER and ED RABEY, Beyer and Rabey are Los Angeles travel writers .
Columbus called this bay El Golfo de Buen Tiempo because of the fair weather he encountered, but 16th-Century Spaniards changed it to Bahia de Mantega, or "lard bay," because of their brisk trade in shipping the clarified fat. Somehow the unromantic latter name evolved into Montego Bay. The British arrived in 1655 and, with cannons blazing, routed the Spaniards. They held onto Jamaica until the island gained independence in 1962.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the three years since Makonnen Blake Hannah was named a government technology consultant, he's been to Harvard twice, NASA's Kennedy Space Center once and is now networking daily with some of the brightest young minds in the United States. Back home, he has delivered speeches, dedicated new high-tech projects and, every month, sent his boss a detailed report on everything from the hottest new computer games to instructions on building intranets in the nation's schools.
NEWS
August 18, 1986 | WILLIAM R. LONG, Times Staff Writer
Robin Downs watched a government team, including policemen, invade his small patch of marijuana. Downs, 31, a quiet man who wears his hair braided in "dreadlocks," kept a discreet distance to avoid arrest. "I had to stay far in the bushes," he recalled. He heard the hoarse wail of gasoline-powered brush cutters, smelled the acrid smoke from a crackling bonfire, saw his crop go up in billowing clouds. That was several months ago.
NEWS
January 16, 1989
Jamaican Prime Minister Edward Seaga, the Reagan Administration's closest ally in the Caribbean, announced a parliamentary election for Feb. 9. Seaga, 58, who is seeking an unprecedented third consecutive four-year term, criticized his main rival, Socialist opposition leader Michael Manley. Seaga, at a Kingston rally, berated Manley's record and took credit for restoring political stability, economic recovery and international relations.
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