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Jamaica Elections

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NEWS
February 6, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
This Caribbean nation will decisively set aside eight years of Ronald Reagan-style pro-business government this week and veer to the left, according to an authoritative poll published Sunday, ending a short election campaign that has been surprising for its lack of passion and ideology.
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NEWS
December 19, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of miles and a world away from his police chief's office in South Pasadena, Michael Berkow craned over a harried Jamaican police dispatcher Thursday as a command center console crackled nonstop. "Shots fired. Olympic Gardens." "Crowd forming. No ballot boxes." "Barrytown, Montego Bay. No black books."
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NEWS
February 3, 1989
Jamaican troops and police patrolled a tense provincial city to halt pre-election street fighting between party gunmen that has left at least two people dead and several houses firebombed this week. Hundreds of soldiers and police flooded into Spanish Town, about 15 miles west of Kingston, to stop clashes between supporters of the ruling Jamaica Labor Party and the opposition People's National Party.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conservative People's National Party won a crushing victory Tuesday in parliamentary elections marred by confusion approaching chaos and partisan conflicts that neared serious violence. With more than 60% of the vote counted, computer projections gave the PNP and its leader, Prime Minister P. J. Patterson, at least 64% of the vote against 36% for the opposition Jamaica Labor Party of former Prime Minister Edward Seaga, who conceded defeat.
NEWS
February 11, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister-designate Michael Manley, an America-bashing socialist firebrand in the 1970s but now a moderate social democrat, set good relations with Washington as his first priority Friday and vowed that economically troubled Jamaica will honor its $4-billion foreign debt.
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most violent campaign in more than a decade, Jamaica holds watershed elections today, marking the probable end of two political dynasties and underlining the nation's turn from radicalism to a moderate, free-market economy. Since Prime Minister P. J. Patterson called parliamentary elections three weeks ago, at least 11 people have been killed in incidents connected to the campaign, and several candidates and political workers have been attacked or threatened.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
"I think we've all grown a little older and wiser and more mellow with the years," one-time socialist firebrand Michael Manley said, explaining both his conversion to moderate politics and the relatively bloodless calm that has preceded today's election in Jamaica.
NEWS
February 10, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Former Prime Minister Michael Manley, a one-time radical socialist who led Jamaica to near-collapse in the 1970s, swept back into power Thursday with a landslide victory in an election marred by sporadic violence and charges of fraud and voter intimidation. With almost two-thirds of the vote counted, Manley's People's National Party led the Jamaica Labor Party of Prime Minister Edward Seaga in 43 of the nation's 60 parliamentary voting districts.
NEWS
December 19, 1997 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of miles and a world away from his police chief's office in South Pasadena, Michael Berkow craned over a harried Jamaican police dispatcher Thursday as a command center console crackled nonstop. "Shots fired. Olympic Gardens." "Crowd forming. No ballot boxes." "Barrytown, Montego Bay. No black books."
NEWS
July 3, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Opponents blamed his Yankee-baiting coziness with Cuba's Fidel Castro and his radical-left economic policies for turning this lush island country into a business and tourist wasteland. His bombastic support of "anti-imperialist" Third World causes such as the New International Economic Order bitterly soured relations with Jamaica's traditional patrons, Britain and the United States.
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most violent campaign in more than a decade, Jamaica holds watershed elections today, marking the probable end of two political dynasties and underlining the nation's turn from radicalism to a moderate, free-market economy. Since Prime Minister P. J. Patterson called parliamentary elections three weeks ago, at least 11 people have been killed in incidents connected to the campaign, and several candidates and political workers have been attacked or threatened.
NEWS
February 11, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister-designate Michael Manley, an America-bashing socialist firebrand in the 1970s but now a moderate social democrat, set good relations with Washington as his first priority Friday and vowed that economically troubled Jamaica will honor its $4-billion foreign debt.
NEWS
February 10, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Former Prime Minister Michael Manley, a one-time radical socialist who led Jamaica to near-collapse in the 1970s, swept back into power Thursday with a landslide victory in an election marred by sporadic violence and charges of fraud and voter intimidation. With almost two-thirds of the vote counted, Manley's People's National Party led the Jamaica Labor Party of Prime Minister Edward Seaga in 43 of the nation's 60 parliamentary voting districts.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
"I think we've all grown a little older and wiser and more mellow with the years," one-time socialist firebrand Michael Manley said, explaining both his conversion to moderate politics and the relatively bloodless calm that has preceded today's election in Jamaica.
NEWS
February 6, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
This Caribbean nation will decisively set aside eight years of Ronald Reagan-style pro-business government this week and veer to the left, according to an authoritative poll published Sunday, ending a short election campaign that has been surprising for its lack of passion and ideology.
NEWS
February 3, 1989
Jamaican troops and police patrolled a tense provincial city to halt pre-election street fighting between party gunmen that has left at least two people dead and several houses firebombed this week. Hundreds of soldiers and police flooded into Spanish Town, about 15 miles west of Kingston, to stop clashes between supporters of the ruling Jamaica Labor Party and the opposition People's National Party.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conservative People's National Party won a crushing victory Tuesday in parliamentary elections marred by confusion approaching chaos and partisan conflicts that neared serious violence. With more than 60% of the vote counted, computer projections gave the PNP and its leader, Prime Minister P. J. Patterson, at least 64% of the vote against 36% for the opposition Jamaica Labor Party of former Prime Minister Edward Seaga, who conceded defeat.
NEWS
July 3, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Opponents blamed his Yankee-baiting coziness with Cuba's Fidel Castro and his radical-left economic policies for turning this lush island country into a business and tourist wasteland. His bombastic support of "anti-imperialist" Third World causes such as the New International Economic Order bitterly soured relations with Jamaica's traditional patrons, Britain and the United States.
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