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NEWS
February 11, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister-designate Michael Manley, an America-bashing socialist firebrand in the 1970s but now a moderate social democrat, set good relations with Washington as his first priority Friday and vowed that economically troubled Jamaica will honor its $4-billion foreign debt.
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NEWS
October 23, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, the corner bedroom of the simple home in suburban New Kingston seems a typical teenager's space: wall posters of the Reggae Boyz, Jamaica's national soccer team; a girlfriend's portrait; a boom box; and a bedspread of suns, moons and stars.
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NEWS
March 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Governing party leaders selected former Finance Minister P. J. Patterson, a political insider, as prime minister to lead Jamaica through one of its most painful economic periods. Patterson, 56, will succeed outgoing Prime Minister Michael Manley, 67, who announced his resignation earlier this month because of poor health. About 3,100 party delegates voted, supporting Patterson by a 3-1 margin over Labor Minister Portia Simpson, 39, who waged an electrifying grass-roots campaign for the post.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conservative People's National Party won a crushing victory Tuesday in parliamentary elections marred by confusion approaching chaos and partisan conflicts that neared serious violence. With more than 60% of the vote counted, computer projections gave the PNP and its leader, Prime Minister P. J. Patterson, at least 64% of the vote against 36% for the opposition Jamaica Labor Party of former Prime Minister Edward Seaga, who conceded defeat.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
"I think we've all grown a little older and wiser and more mellow with the years," one-time socialist firebrand Michael Manley said, explaining both his conversion to moderate politics and the relatively bloodless calm that has preceded today's election in Jamaica.
NEWS
February 10, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Former Prime Minister Michael Manley, a one-time radical socialist who led Jamaica to near-collapse in the 1970s, swept back into power Thursday with a landslide victory in an election marred by sporadic violence and charges of fraud and voter intimidation. With almost two-thirds of the vote counted, Manley's People's National Party led the Jamaica Labor Party of Prime Minister Edward Seaga in 43 of the nation's 60 parliamentary voting districts.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The politics of Jamaica, where ideological loyalties once ran so deep that overwrought party gunmen often shot out their differences in the streets, have turned topsy-turvy and blissfully peaceful since the country's last general election a little more than two years ago.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conservative People's National Party won a crushing victory Tuesday in parliamentary elections marred by confusion approaching chaos and partisan conflicts that neared serious violence. With more than 60% of the vote counted, computer projections gave the PNP and its leader, Prime Minister P. J. Patterson, at least 64% of the vote against 36% for the opposition Jamaica Labor Party of former Prime Minister Edward Seaga, who conceded defeat.
NEWS
October 23, 1998 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, the corner bedroom of the simple home in suburban New Kingston seems a typical teenager's space: wall posters of the Reggae Boyz, Jamaica's national soccer team; a girlfriend's portrait; a boom box; and a bedspread of suns, moons and stars.
NEWS
June 2, 2001 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imagine a lush, tropical land just a few hundred miles off the U.S. coast where marijuana, though illegal, is a cultural icon worshiped by thousands and so plentiful it goes for just $26 a pound. Now, imagine this place when it's legal. That's precisely what Jamaica's government-appointed National Commission on Ganja has been doing for the last nine months.
NEWS
March 29, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Governing party leaders selected former Finance Minister P. J. Patterson, a political insider, as prime minister to lead Jamaica through one of its most painful economic periods. Patterson, 56, will succeed outgoing Prime Minister Michael Manley, 67, who announced his resignation earlier this month because of poor health. About 3,100 party delegates voted, supporting Patterson by a 3-1 margin over Labor Minister Portia Simpson, 39, who waged an electrifying grass-roots campaign for the post.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The politics of Jamaica, where ideological loyalties once ran so deep that overwrought party gunmen often shot out their differences in the streets, have turned topsy-turvy and blissfully peaceful since the country's last general election a little more than two years ago.
NEWS
February 11, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Prime Minister-designate Michael Manley, an America-bashing socialist firebrand in the 1970s but now a moderate social democrat, set good relations with Washington as his first priority Friday and vowed that economically troubled Jamaica will honor its $4-billion foreign debt.
NEWS
February 10, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
Former Prime Minister Michael Manley, a one-time radical socialist who led Jamaica to near-collapse in the 1970s, swept back into power Thursday with a landslide victory in an election marred by sporadic violence and charges of fraud and voter intimidation. With almost two-thirds of the vote counted, Manley's People's National Party led the Jamaica Labor Party of Prime Minister Edward Seaga in 43 of the nation's 60 parliamentary voting districts.
NEWS
February 9, 1989 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
"I think we've all grown a little older and wiser and more mellow with the years," one-time socialist firebrand Michael Manley said, explaining both his conversion to moderate politics and the relatively bloodless calm that has preceded today's election in Jamaica.
NEWS
July 22, 1990 | LEE HOCKSTADER, THE WASHINGTON POST
For many years, the slogan "out of many, one people" has been repeated here as a kind of official mantra, advertising a society that was said to have struck a balance of racial diversity and harmony. In a country where people are described on the basis of such finely distinguished hues as "high brown," "fair-skinned" and "Jamaican white," the slogan also seemed to hold the promise that racial consciousness would not devolve into racial rivalry.
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