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Jamaica Kincaid

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
In her long and illustrious career, Jamaica Kincaid has tackled many genres of literature. So best believe her when she says that her 2013 work "See Now Then" is a novel and a work of fiction. Period. That's why, she said in a discussion with Hector Tobar on Sunday at the Festival of Books, "the most irritating thing" about the reaction to the book has been the insinuation that it is really a roman-a-clef, a memoir disguised as a fiction. "I will assert that if I were a white man this would not be the conversation," Kincaid told the audience at the Embassy Room Auditorium, who responded with a round of applause.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
In her long and illustrious career, Jamaica Kincaid has tackled many genres of literature. So best believe her when she says that her 2013 work "See Now Then" is a novel and a work of fiction. Period. That's why, she said in a discussion with Hector Tobar on Sunday at the Festival of Books, "the most irritating thing" about the reaction to the book has been the insinuation that it is really a roman-a-clef, a memoir disguised as a fiction. "I will assert that if I were a white man this would not be the conversation," Kincaid told the audience at the Embassy Room Auditorium, who responded with a round of applause.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
See Now Then A Novel Jamaica Kincaid Farrar, Straus and Giroux: 192 pp., $24 There are two ways to read Jamaica Kincaid's mesmerizing new novel, "See Now Then. " The first is the way any work of art should be read: by simply absorbing what's on the page. This is how I read the first two-thirds of "See Now Then. " "See Now Then" is Kincaid's first novel in a decade, and it's the story of a marriage whose toxicity is killing the two people in it. But more than that, the book reads like an allegory or fable about a doomed family, an effect heightened by its protagonists, Mr. and Mrs. Sweet, having two children with names taken from Greek mythology - Heracles and Persephone.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Since background-check legislation was voted down in the Senate on Thursday, Adam Winkler, author of "Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America," expects a "lively" conversation at his panel on guns in America at the 18th annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. "This is a hot-button issue, and we have a collection of some of the leading scholars on guns and gun politics on this panel," he says. "Sometimes things can get heated. But I find that people are really hungering for a balanced, non-emotional discussion.
BOOKS
July 24, 1988
Jamaica Kincaid has written a powerful essay about her native Antigua, evoking the languid rhythms of tropical life in prose that is also urgent and poetic.--Caryl Phillips SUBJECT TO CHANGE by Lois Gould (Farrar, Straus & Giroux: $16.95; 202 pp.) This Renaissance morality tale of journeys and spells is loosely based on the court of Henry II, where an ironic reversal of power and position occurs, and what happens precisely is not precisely clear.--Richard Eder
BOOKS
January 14, 1996 | RICHARD EDER
Her mother was a foundling left near the door of a convent on the island of Dominica. And when Xuela, narrator of this beautiful, harsh story, was born, the mother died. So Xuela was a doubled orphan, her woman's lineage extinguished for two generations back.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a crisp New England midday, it might have been tempting to stay in a room where peony-hued bookshelves exploded off walls the color of unripe mangoes. But Jamaica Kincaid issued an irresistible invitation--"Let's go out, shall we?--and through a door framed in lime-green woodwork, she led the way to her miracle of a garden. In a region known for maple trees, Kincaid cultivates bamboo. Frost gnaws at the air, and still her hibiscus blossoms bloom defiantly.
BOOKS
November 21, 1999 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
We've become used to such a high level of complaint from the Irish, what with the brothers McCourt and all, that this quiet memoir inside a novel takes a reader by surprise. A young man, sent by his mother to care for his ailing grandfather when he was only 7, sent from sprawling Dublin out to a remote spit of land called the Inish, is forced to grow, like a tree around a rock, around a loneliness he cannot shake.
BOOKS
July 28, 2002 | MICHAEL HARRIS, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
Jamaica Kincaid takes on a difficult task in her new novel, "Mr. Potter." The narrator tries to describe a man she hardly knows--her father. Roderick Potter is a taxi driver on Kincaid's native island of Antigua in the Caribbean. His outer life is uneventful, and his inner life ... well, because he can't read or write and because the cruelties of history (the island's and his own) have brutalized and numbed him, he has almost no inner life.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
See Now Then A Novel Jamaica Kincaid Farrar, Straus and Giroux: 192 pp., $24 There are two ways to read Jamaica Kincaid's mesmerizing new novel, "See Now Then. " The first is the way any work of art should be read: by simply absorbing what's on the page. This is how I read the first two-thirds of "See Now Then. " "See Now Then" is Kincaid's first novel in a decade, and it's the story of a marriage whose toxicity is killing the two people in it. But more than that, the book reads like an allegory or fable about a doomed family, an effect heightened by its protagonists, Mr. and Mrs. Sweet, having two children with names taken from Greek mythology - Heracles and Persephone.
BOOKS
July 28, 2002 | MICHAEL HARRIS, Michael Harris is a regular contributor to Book Review.
Jamaica Kincaid takes on a difficult task in her new novel, "Mr. Potter." The narrator tries to describe a man she hardly knows--her father. Roderick Potter is a taxi driver on Kincaid's native island of Antigua in the Caribbean. His outer life is uneventful, and his inner life ... well, because he can't read or write and because the cruelties of history (the island's and his own) have brutalized and numbed him, he has almost no inner life.
BOOKS
November 21, 1999 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
We've become used to such a high level of complaint from the Irish, what with the brothers McCourt and all, that this quiet memoir inside a novel takes a reader by surprise. A young man, sent by his mother to care for his ailing grandfather when he was only 7, sent from sprawling Dublin out to a remote spit of land called the Inish, is forced to grow, like a tree around a rock, around a loneliness he cannot shake.
NEWS
December 17, 1998 | SUSIE LINFIELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I have never owned a garden and probably never will. I can't recall ever having planted a seed. In my New York City apartment, which is not, alas, flooded with light, there is exactly one water-deprived plant, which does not appear to be thriving. I may therefore not be the target audience for "My Favorite Plant," a collection of essays whose contributors range from professional horticulturists to contemporary fiction writers.
NEWS
November 28, 1997 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a crisp New England midday, it might have been tempting to stay in a room where peony-hued bookshelves exploded off walls the color of unripe mangoes. But Jamaica Kincaid issued an irresistible invitation--"Let's go out, shall we?--and through a door framed in lime-green woodwork, she led the way to her miracle of a garden. In a region known for maple trees, Kincaid cultivates bamboo. Frost gnaws at the air, and still her hibiscus blossoms bloom defiantly.
BOOKS
January 14, 1996 | RICHARD EDER
Her mother was a foundling left near the door of a convent on the island of Dominica. And when Xuela, narrator of this beautiful, harsh story, was born, the mother died. So Xuela was a doubled orphan, her woman's lineage extinguished for two generations back.
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