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NEWS
April 28, 1991 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The politics of Jamaica, where ideological loyalties once ran so deep that overwrought party gunmen often shot out their differences in the streets, have turned topsy-turvy and blissfully peaceful since the country's last general election a little more than two years ago.
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NEWS
October 17, 1996 | Reuters
Jamaica's Rastafarians won the support of doctors, lawyers and even an English lord Wednesday in a bid to decriminalize marijuana. The Rastafarians, who worship the late Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie, launched the Legalize Ganja Campaign because they regularly use marijuana in their rituals.
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NEWS
March 30, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most violent campaign in more than a decade, Jamaica holds watershed elections today, marking the probable end of two political dynasties and underlining the nation's turn from radicalism to a moderate, free-market economy. Since Prime Minister P. J. Patterson called parliamentary elections three weeks ago, at least 11 people have been killed in incidents connected to the campaign, and several candidates and political workers have been attacked or threatened.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conservative People's National Party won a crushing victory Tuesday in parliamentary elections marred by confusion approaching chaos and partisan conflicts that neared serious violence. With more than 60% of the vote counted, computer projections gave the PNP and its leader, Prime Minister P. J. Patterson, at least 64% of the vote against 36% for the opposition Jamaica Labor Party of former Prime Minister Edward Seaga, who conceded defeat.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The conservative People's National Party won a crushing victory Tuesday in parliamentary elections marred by confusion approaching chaos and partisan conflicts that neared serious violence. With more than 60% of the vote counted, computer projections gave the PNP and its leader, Prime Minister P. J. Patterson, at least 64% of the vote against 36% for the opposition Jamaica Labor Party of former Prime Minister Edward Seaga, who conceded defeat.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | Reuters
Jamaica's Rastafarians won the support of doctors, lawyers and even an English lord Wednesday in a bid to decriminalize marijuana. The Rastafarians, who worship the late Ethiopian Emperor Haile Selassie, launched the Legalize Ganja Campaign because they regularly use marijuana in their rituals.
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most violent campaign in more than a decade, Jamaica holds watershed elections today, marking the probable end of two political dynasties and underlining the nation's turn from radicalism to a moderate, free-market economy. Since Prime Minister P. J. Patterson called parliamentary elections three weeks ago, at least 11 people have been killed in incidents connected to the campaign, and several candidates and political workers have been attacked or threatened.
NEWS
April 28, 1991 | DON A. SCHANCHE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The politics of Jamaica, where ideological loyalties once ran so deep that overwrought party gunmen often shot out their differences in the streets, have turned topsy-turvy and blissfully peaceful since the country's last general election a little more than two years ago.
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