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Jamaica Relief

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NEWS
October 4, 1988
Three weeks after Hurricane Gilbert destroyed Jamaican homes and businesses, relief supplies for the island are piled up in churches and armories across New York because of a bureaucratic snafu, frustrated relief workers said. More than 300,000 pounds of medicine, food, building materials and clothing are sitting in facilities from New York City to Buffalo because the federal government will not allow the state's National Guard to take them to Jamaica.
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NEWS
October 4, 1988
Three weeks after Hurricane Gilbert destroyed Jamaican homes and businesses, relief supplies for the island are piled up in churches and armories across New York because of a bureaucratic snafu, frustrated relief workers said. More than 300,000 pounds of medicine, food, building materials and clothing are sitting in facilities from New York City to Buffalo because the federal government will not allow the state's National Guard to take them to Jamaica.
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NEWS
September 15, 1988 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Among the 80,000 native Jamaicans who live in Los Angeles, Stone Market is a cultural and culinary outpost. It is to the hectic, little store at 6700 S. Crenshaw Blvd. in the Hyde Park area that many come to buy mango nectar, peppery spices and other imported Caribbean foods.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
"We put the old roof back on, but if you look up, you see stars in the night," Cleveland Kerr, who lives on the poorest and hardest-hit street in this poorest of villages, said with a laugh. "But we're trying," interjected Kerr's next-door neighbor, Alphanso Tyrell, who had just finished clearing two fallen trees and sweeping the hard-packed red earth of his tiny but tidy front yard.
NEWS
September 17, 1988 | RON SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Relief efforts by Los Angeles area organizations to help residents on the devastated island of Jamaica got off to a fast start this week. The problem was finding a way to fly everything from medicine to hammers and roofing supplies to the storm-crippled island, officials said Friday. "We have tons and tons of things," said Donovan Gordon, 30, a Los Angeles sales representative from Old Harbour Bay, Jamaica, who is coordinating a relief effort for a group calling itself Concerned Jamaicans.
NEWS
September 20, 1988 | DON A. SCHANCHE, Times Staff Writer
"We put the old roof back on, but if you look up, you see stars in the night," Cleveland Kerr, who lives on the poorest and hardest-hit street in this poorest of villages, said with a laugh. "But we're trying," interjected Kerr's next-door neighbor, Alphanso Tyrell, who had just finished clearing two fallen trees and sweeping the hard-packed red earth of his tiny but tidy front yard.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
Too bad only 100 people showed up at the John Anson Ford Theatre on Saturday afternoon, because a Jamaican-born, New York-bred toaster/rapper who goes by the name of Shinehead served notice that his brand of reggae spiced with rap is a future force to be reckoned with.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2004 | Nick Charles, Special to The Times
In the courtroom where Martha Stewart is on trial, there are stretches of pin-dropping silence, interrupted by lawyers droning, witnesses responding and the queries and admonitions of the presiding judge. But in the overflow room, an anteroom set up to accommodate the crush of media and curious members of the public, things are less serene. The door is constantly slamming as people flit in and out.
NEWS
September 17, 1988 | RON SOBLE, Times Staff Writer
Relief efforts by Los Angeles area organizations to help residents on the devastated island of Jamaica got off to a fast start this week. The problem was finding a way to fly everything from medicine to hammers and roofing supplies to the storm-crippled island, officials said Friday. "We have tons and tons of things," said Donovan Gordon, 30, a Los Angeles sales representative from Old Harbour Bay, Jamaica, who is coordinating a relief effort for a group calling itself Concerned Jamaicans.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | DAVID FREED, Times Staff Writer
Among the 80,000 native Jamaicans who live in Los Angeles, Stone Market is a cultural and culinary outpost. It is to the hectic, little store at 6700 S. Crenshaw Blvd. in the Hyde Park area that many come to buy mango nectar, peppery spices and other imported Caribbean foods.
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