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ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
Since background-check legislation was voted down in the Senate on Thursday, Adam Winkler, author of "Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America," expects a "lively" conversation at his panel on guns in America at the 18th annual Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. "This is a hot-button issue, and we have a collection of some of the leading scholars on guns and gun politics on this panel," he says. "Sometimes things can get heated. But I find that people are really hungering for a balanced, non-emotional discussion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2013 | By Chris Lee, Los Angeles Times
Snoop Dogg had come to Burbank to let loose the lion. Engulfed by a haze of marijuana smoke thick as London fog in a hotel suite high above the so-called Media Capital of the World, the gangsta rap superstar surrendered himself to a hairdresser's strenuous manipulations as she twisted and caressed his skinny braids into cheroot-shaped dreadlocks. The Doggfather's coiffure needed to be Rastafari-real, after all, for his television debut as the new Snoop. One Love Snoop. Reggae Snoop.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
Ricky (Sheldon Shepherd), the hero of Storm Saulter's ambitious coming-of-age drama "Better Mus' Come," is a man for all seasons. Gangster, community leader, part-time poet, full-time dad, Ricky negotiates the dangerous complexities of the culture of violence inflaming Jamaica in the late '70s, uncertain what path he should take. "You cannot fight the righteous battle with weapons of war," Ricky is told, though, given the political unrest and poverty of his country, the words are easier to say than practice.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
First he was Snoop Doggy Dogg, then simply Snoop Dogg. Now, 20 years after the release of his debut single as a solo artist - the still-vibrant "Who Am I (What's My Name?)" - the laid-back rapper from Long Beach has altered his identity once again. And this time he's changed his sound too: Next month, Snoop Lion is to release a full-on reggae album called "Reincarnated," the product of an extended trip he and his crew took last year to Jamaica. "One king, one faith, one religion," he raps (in ersatz island patois)
TRAVEL
March 10, 2013
1.Government authorities in Jamaica say they have uncovered a ring involved in trafficking Jamaican children to another Caribbean country. It was unknown how many children were involved. 2.After the meteor explosion last month over Chelyabinsk, Russia, officials hope to develop the area as a tourist attraction. A local travel agency is already booking summer trips for Japanese tourists. 3.The Naked Rambler, a Brit who has twice walked the length of the country while wearing no clothes, was in jail again after he was caught in public in Southampton, England, wearing only boots, socks and a knapsack.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
Snoop Dogg has been called many things over the course of his two-decade career -- Snoop Doggy Dogg, Bigg Snoop Dogg and Snoop D-O Double G are just a few of the monikers. When the multi-platinum rapper announced last summer that he'd been reborn as Snoop Lion and would trade in the menacing gangster rap that made him a superstar for rasta patois and issue a disc soaked in reggae rhythms , reaction was mixed, with a few critics writing it off as a gimmick. The rapper-turned-Rastafarian has announced his new album, Snoop Lion's debut, “Reincarnated,” will arrive on April 23. RELATED: Snoop Lion: 'La La La' and a rapper's transition into reggae Executive produced by Diplo and his Major Lazer production team (who even gave Beyoncé a sampling of their dancehall influences)
TRAVEL
February 16, 2013 | Los Angeles Times
After recovering from serious health problems, Richard Lowe traveled to Jamaica to celebrate life. “This vacation was my gift to myself for surviving,” he said. Seeing this pair afloat above the waters off Negril Beach, in western Jamaica, Lowe vowed to parasail on his next trip to the resort. The Los Angeles resident used an iPad. To submit your photos, visit our reader photo gallery . When you upload your photos, tell us where they were taken and when. The more we know about a photo, the more likely it is that we'll feature it in "Your Scene," a weekly photo feature that appears online and in print.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
See Now Then A Novel Jamaica Kincaid Farrar, Straus and Giroux: 192 pp., $24 There are two ways to read Jamaica Kincaid's mesmerizing new novel, "See Now Then. " The first is the way any work of art should be read: by simply absorbing what's on the page. This is how I read the first two-thirds of "See Now Then. " "See Now Then" is Kincaid's first novel in a decade, and it's the story of a marriage whose toxicity is killing the two people in it. But more than that, the book reads like an allegory or fable about a doomed family, an effect heightened by its protagonists, Mr. and Mrs. Sweet, having two children with names taken from Greek mythology - Heracles and Persephone.
TRAVEL
December 8, 2012
Centrally located on Negril's legendary beach in Jamaica, White Sands offers 45 reasonably priced, comfortable rooms. Owner Henry Moo-Young and his family take pride in welcoming repeat guests to this lush property, which offers free Wi-Fi and safe deposit boxes, a private pool, a restaurant and a beachside bar. White Sands, Norman Manley Boulevard, Negril; (305) 503-9074 or (876) 957-4291, http://www.whitesandsjamaica.com . Rates from $69, Dec. 15-April 15. Elizabeth Bardsley Burbank
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2012 | By Paula L. Woods
Kingston Noir Edited by Colin Channer Akashic Books: 285 pp; $15.95 trade paper original Starting in 2004 with "Brooklyn Noir," the more than 50 titles in the Akashic Books series of crime fiction have been distinguished by contributions from writers who live in or write about cities and areas rife with Hollywood-influenced dark sensibilities (Los Angeles, Manhattan, San Francisco) as well as unexpected places (the Twin Cities, Orange County, Delhi) but whose stories teem nonetheless with betrayal, rage and revenge.
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