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Jamboree Housing Corp

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2000 | Eric C Sanitate, (949) 248-2152
The builder behind one of South County's largest developments has delayed handing off the construction of low-income housing it's obligated to build to a nonprofit corporation. At last week's City Council meeting, a request from the developer of the new master-planned community called Talega to allow the Irvine-based nonprofit Jamboree Housing Corp. to build and manage a 186-unit low-income apartment complex on 10 acres of the Talega development was postponed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2000 | Eric C Sanitate, (949) 248-2152
The builder behind one of South County's largest developments has delayed handing off the construction of low-income housing it's obligated to build to a nonprofit corporation. At last week's City Council meeting, a request from the developer of the new master-planned community called Talega to allow the Irvine-based nonprofit Jamboree Housing Corp. to build and manage a 186-unit low-income apartment complex on 10 acres of the Talega development was postponed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD
Twenty low-income families have begun the year house hunting, thanks to a $1-million first-time home buyers program administered by Jamboree Housing Corp. Each family will receive a loan of up to $50,000 to be used as a down payment for a house or condominium in Irvine. Without the money, most of them simply couldn't afford a home, said Lila Lieberthal, executive director of the nonprofit affordable housing group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD
Twenty low-income families have begun the year house hunting, thanks to a $1-million first-time home buyers program administered by Jamboree Housing Corp. Each family will receive a loan of up to $50,000 to be used as a down payment for a house or condominium in Irvine. Without the money, most of them simply couldn't afford a home, said Lila Lieberthal, executive director of the nonprofit affordable housing group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1997 | SUSAN DEEMER
The grand opening of Camden Place, a senior apartment complex and community center, has been postponed from today to Oct. 9. The housing community, which meets Orange County's low-income requirements, offers one- and two-bedroom apartments, ranging from $560 to $660 per month. The complex, at 4500 Denni St., was developed in partnership with the city's community development commission, the Olson Co., Jamboree Housing Corp. and Enterprise Social Investments. Information: (714) 596-4770, Ext.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1994
When it comes to having a stake in the neighborhood, few things are better motivators than home ownership, a fact that the federal government wisely recognizes. Several communities in Orange County have taken advantage of a federal program to make it easy for people with below-average incomes to buy their first homes. Irvine is the latest. The private, nonprofit Jamboree Housing Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1997 | DEBRA CANO
In a step to revitalize an older area of the city, officials signaled the start of construction of 48 townhomes for low- to moderate-income families, to be built on the former site of an abandoned carpenters union hall. The city's redevelopment agency, the Olson Co., a Seal Beach-based developer, and Jamboree Housing Corp. of Irvine, a nonprofit housing corporation, have joined together to build the affordable-housing project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD
Sharon Horn has spent the past two weeks arranging furniture, unpacking boxes and adding "homey touches" such as plants to her new two-bedroom condominium in Irvine. It's a job Horn said she's dreamed about for years. "It's really a dream come true," said Horn, a single mother of two. "It feels good to own your own place. I didn't think I'd be able to afford it unless I won the lottery or something."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2006 | Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writer
It was not the first time a proposal to build low-cost housing stirred emotions in Anaheim. This time, though, all five City Council members said they were embarrassed, even repulsed, by comments from those who spoke out against providing housing for the mentally disabled. Issues surrounding the planned complex have drawn the attention of low-cost-housing advocates from throughout Orange County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 2006 | Hemmy So and Dave McKibben, Times Staff Writers
Essentially dismissed by city leaders as the meanest people in town, residents along an Anaheim street remained largely unapologetic Thursday for suggesting that a housing project for the mentally ill would bring undesirables to their community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2002 | Jennifer Mena, Times Staff Writer
For some Santa Ana city officials and longtime residents, it's hard to believe: Minnie Street is now three blocks of tree-lined parkways and clean sidewalks, a place where residents can walk in safety day or night. It once was one of Santa Ana's toughest neighborhoods, where immigrants stuffed themselves into low-rent apartments only to live around drug dealers, prostitutes and gang members who ruled a community of 3,500 people living in 527 apartments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2003 | Gregory W. Griggs, Times Staff Writer
As a young boy, Mike McGuire watched his father build the home he would grow up in. During his high school and college years, he learned first-hand about construction while working for a small developer that built rental homes. "By the time I was 20," he said, "I could wire a home, frame it and pour the concrete foundation." Today, McGuire, 57, is president of the hugely successful Affinity Bank in Ventura.
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