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NEWS
August 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Mongolian government will try a Stalinist former prime minister, an ex-president and 10 other former leaders on corruption charges, a government spokesman said. No court date has been announced for the 12 Communist hard-liners who once ran Mongolia. Among them are former Prime Minister Dumaagiyn Sodnom, who retired in March, 1990, when the Communist Party renounced its monopoly on power and former President Jambyn Batmonh, who left office at the same time.
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NEWS
August 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Mongolian government will try a Stalinist former prime minister, an ex-president and 10 other former leaders on corruption charges, a government spokesman said. No court date has been announced for the 12 Communist hard-liners who once ran Mongolia. Among them are former Prime Minister Dumaagiyn Sodnom, who retired in March, 1990, when the Communist Party renounced its monopoly on power and former President Jambyn Batmonh, who left office at the same time.
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NEWS
March 13, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mongolian President Jambyn Batmonh submitted a sweeping program of political reform at a Communist Party meeting in Ulan Bator on Monday, including an offer of his own resignation as party leader. In a somber speech to the party's Central Committee, broadcast live on state-run television, Batmonh proposed that he and the entire ruling Politburo resign and that the party hold a special congress April 10 to elect new leaders.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mongolian President Jambyn Batmonh submitted a sweeping program of political reform at a Communist Party meeting in Ulan Bator on Monday, including an offer of his own resignation as party leader. In a somber speech to the party's Central Committee, broadcast live on state-run television, Batmonh proposed that he and the entire ruling Politburo resign and that the party hold a special congress April 10 to elect new leaders.
NEWS
August 25, 1991 | Reuters
The Mongolian government will try a Stalinist ex-prime minister, an ex-president and 10 other former leaders for corruption, a government spokesman said Friday. No court date has been announced for the 12 Communist hard-liners who once ran Mongolia. Among them are former Prime Minister Sodnom former President Jambyn Batmonh, who left office in March, 1990. They are charged with misappropriation of millions of dollars in state funds.
NEWS
July 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
China and Mongolia restored long-severed party ties during a visit to Ulan Bator by a Chinese Communist Party delegation, the official New China News Agency reported Saturday. In a dispatch from the Mongolian capital, the news agency said Mongolian leader Jambyn Batmonh praised the normalization of party links during a meeting Friday with Zhu Liang, head of the International Liaison Department of China's Communist Party.
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The entire Communist Party leadership resigned today in response to opposition demands and the leader of the longtime Soviet client state said the ruling party must renew itself to head off crisis. The five-man Politburo of the Mongolian People's Revolutionary Party voted to abolish the constitutional clause declaring the party the leading force in society.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Mongolia's Communist leaders offered to resign Friday in the face of protests by thousands of people calling for multi-party democracy, East Bloc news agencies reported from the capital Ulan Bator. The East German news agency ADN and the Soviet news agency Tass also said a national referendum will be organized to give the people an opportunity to say whether they had confidence in the Mongolian Parliament, the People's Great Hural.
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Communist Party supporters staged a pro-government rally in the Mongolian capital of Ulan Bator on Sunday, while Buddhists held a separate demonstration demanding resumption of religious activity at an old temple. There were no reports of violence. However, the competing protests marked a new level of tension as opposition forces press demands for rapid political change and the government's response remains uncertain.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | From Reuters
Mongolia's opposition groups negotiated with the government Saturday on arrangements for a referendum to gauge public approval of the country's parliament, the Great Hural. The talks took place a day after an opposition hunger strike ended when Communist Party leaders agreed to resign. Damdindorj Ninj, who leads one of the four opposition groups pushing for a multi-party democracy, said he is confident that the country's leaders will follow through on their promises.
NEWS
February 17, 1990 | From Reuters
A senior Mongolian official strongly hinted Friday that the ruling Communist Party may relinquish its 66-year monopoly on power as a democratic group prepares to form the nation's first opposition party. Byraagiin Chimed also told journalists that Mongolia's public prosecutor would launch an investigation into alleged abuses of power by former President Yumjaagiyn Tsedenbal--a close associate of his successor, Jambyn Batmonh. The Mongolian Democratic Assn.
NEWS
November 19, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
South Korea's major opposition party charged Tuesday that the government of President Chun Doo Hwan is to blame for the false reports of North Korean President Kim Il Sung's death because it hastily made official announcements based on rumors. The New Korea Democratic Party attacked the government's handling of the matter during budget deliberations in the National Assembly, demanding that the entire Cabinet resign to take responsibility for causing confusion and public fear.
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