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Jamers A Iii Baker

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July 27, 1992 | Associated Press
James A. Baker III will remain secretary of state "for some time to come" and reports that he will step aside to help with President Bush's campaign are nonsense, the State Department's No. 2 official said Sunday. "I will wager you that, for some time to come, I will be the deputy secretary of state and Jim Baker will be the secretary," Lawrence S. Eagleburger said on the ABC-TV program "This Week With David Brinkley."
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NEWS
July 27, 1992 | Associated Press
James A. Baker III will remain secretary of state "for some time to come" and reports that he will step aside to help with President Bush's campaign are nonsense, the State Department's No. 2 official said Sunday. "I will wager you that, for some time to come, I will be the deputy secretary of state and Jim Baker will be the secretary," Lawrence S. Eagleburger said on the ABC-TV program "This Week With David Brinkley."
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NEWS
March 17, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, not generally known as a sentimental man, made a sentimental side trip Saturday to visit an old and valued friend: former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze. "Ah, the old team," Shevardnadze beamed as Baker came in the door of his small, 7th-floor apartment in one of Moscow's elite neighborhoods. "That's right," Baker said, grinning broadly. "The old team." For almost two years, Baker and Shevardnadze worked together in trying to improve U.S.
NEWS
July 22, 1992 | MURRAY WAAS and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Waas is a special correspondent and Frantz is a Times staff writer
The CIA warned Secretary of State James A. Baker III in a September, 1989, top-secret assessment that Iraq was developing a "nuclear weapons capability," and the agency identified the specific technology being sought by Baghdad, according to classified documents. Nevertheless, a month later, Baker assured Iraq's foreign minister that the Bush Administration had no plans to tighten controls on technology exports to Iraq.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, trying to walk a diplomatic tightrope over the most bitter ethnic conflict raging in the ruins of the Soviet Union, called Tuesday for a peaceful settlement of the fighting in Nagorno-Karabakh. But he carefully avoided placing blame. "Our message is for peaceful resolution of disputes," Baker said as he met Armenian President Levon Ter-Petrosyan at the president's modest two-story residence in this capital city.
NEWS
July 22, 1992 | MURRAY WAAS and DOUGLAS FRANTZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Waas is a special correspondent and Frantz is a Times staff writer
The CIA warned Secretary of State James A. Baker III in a September, 1989, top-secret assessment that Iraq was developing a "nuclear weapons capability," and the agency identified the specific technology being sought by Baghdad, according to classified documents. Nevertheless, a month later, Baker assured Iraq's foreign minister that the Bush Administration had no plans to tighten controls on technology exports to Iraq.
NEWS
February 12, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, trying to walk a diplomatic tightrope over the most bitter ethnic conflict raging in the ruins of the Soviet Union, called Tuesday for a peaceful settlement of the fighting in Nagorno-Karabakh. But he carefully avoided placing blame. "Our message is for peaceful resolution of disputes," Baker said as he met Armenian President Levon Ter-Petrosyan at the president's modest two-story residence in this capital city.
NEWS
March 17, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, not generally known as a sentimental man, made a sentimental side trip Saturday to visit an old and valued friend: former Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze. "Ah, the old team," Shevardnadze beamed as Baker came in the door of his small, 7th-floor apartment in one of Moscow's elite neighborhoods. "That's right," Baker said, grinning broadly. "The old team." For almost two years, Baker and Shevardnadze worked together in trying to improve U.S.
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