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James A Ardaiz

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NEWS
November 3, 1994 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-ranking state appellate court justice acknowledged that he helped draft the tough "three strikes" sentencing law, bringing criticism from some jurists who say he overstepped his role as a disinterested arbiter of law. James A.
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NEWS
November 3, 1994 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A high-ranking state appellate court justice acknowledged that he helped draft the tough "three strikes" sentencing law, bringing criticism from some jurists who say he overstepped his role as a disinterested arbiter of law. James A.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1996
Your Jan. 3 editorial recognizes that voters should receive relevant information about the qualifications of appellate justices who seek retention in office. The editorial raises a concern that pending legislation-- AB 1936 --would reduce information that voters receive. We write to ensure that the record is complete regarding the intent of the bill. AB 1936 would delete any ballot reference to the length of an appellate justice's additional term of office. Although the term length is determined by the Constitution and does not bear upon qualifications for judicial office, AB 1936 would place information on term length in an accompanying pamphlet provided to voters.
OPINION
November 2, 2012
Re "Debating Proposition 34," opinion, Oct. 28 Jimmy Carter has the chutzpah to write "The process for administering the death penalty in the United States is broken beyond repair. " The biggest problem with California's capital punishment law from 1987 to the present has been the judges appointed to the federal district courts and the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals by none other than Carter. Once again, we are told the system is broken - by one of the key people who broke it. Fortunately, the "beyond repair" part is wrong.
OPINION
October 28, 2012 | By James A. Ardaiz
My entire professional life has been entwined with the death penalty. As a prosecutor, I asked for the death penalty. As a judge, I imposed it. As a citizen, I will vote next month to retain it as a punishment option in California. I have often encountered the argument that the death penalty is not a deterrent because it did not deter someone from carrying out a particular murder. But the actual issue is a larger one: Would there have been more murders in California without its deterrent effect?
NEWS
June 21, 1996 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His thoughts spin around one terrible image: of his daughter, dead, and of himself, helpless. That image is years old now, but it still pulses pain. Mike Reynolds uses that pain. It prodded him to crusade for a "three strikes" law to lock up repeat criminals. And now, strong as ever, that image is back, pushing him to declare that he will not tolerate efforts to weaken "three strikes"--even if he has to take on the California Supreme Court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2003 | Jean Guccione, Times Staff Writer
As state court officials consider how to cut costs to comply with the governor's proposed budget, they are betting on a few controversial policy changes that could produce an estimated $100 million a year in savings and new revenue. Gov. Gray Davis has proposed giving courts greater flexibility to tape-record proceedings rather than rely on court reporters to provide official transcripts, and to seek competitive bids from local law enforcement for courthouse security.
NEWS
November 10, 1994
Key to Election Tables -- An asterisk (*) denotes an incumbent candidate; a double asterisk (**) denotes an appointed incumbent. -- A triple asterisk (***) indicates a race in a district shared by two or more counties. For that reason, individual tables do not reflect the total vote. -- Elected candidates and approved measures are in bold type. Results are not official and could be affected by absentee ballots.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2002 | JEAN GUCCIONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mojave High School senior James Webb woke up three hours before sunrise to see the California Supreme Court in action. He and six classmates drove 60 miles to Bakersfield to watch a live broadcast this week of the oral arguments before the high court in a Calabasas murder case. They also witnessed a small piece of history.
NEWS
May 16, 1997 | MAURA DOLAN and VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a major defeat for Gov. Pete Wilson, the California Supreme Court decided Thursday that the state cannot hire private companies for work that civil servants are capable of performing.
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